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Full text of "The Documentary history of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Vermont : including the journals of the conventions from the year 1790 to 1832, inclusive"

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BoTJglnt from the Library 
OF 

Henry B. Dawson, LL.D. 



THE 



DOCUMENTARY HISTORY 



MiU Wxaiuimi iB\nm\u\ ^huKcft 



IN THE 



DIOCESE OE VERMONT, 



INCLUDING THE 



JOURNALS OF THE CONVENTIONS 

Prom the year 1790 to 1832, inclusive. 



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NEW YORK: 

POTT & AMERY: — C OOPER UNION 

CLAREMONT, N. H.: 

THE CLAEEMONT MANUFACTUEIKG COMPANY. 

1870. 



Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1870, 

' By C. R. BATCHELDER, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Vermont. 



Printed and bound at the Book-making Establishment of 
THE CLAEEMONT MANUFACTUBINO CO. 



PREFACE. 



The work now presented to the public was undertaken in 
pursuance of a resolution of the Convention of the Diocese of 
Vermont. At first it was contemplated to prepare simply an 
edition of the Journals of that body from 1790 to 1832. The 
Rev. C. R. Batchelder, the Rev. George B. Manser, D. D. and the 
Rev. Albert H. Bailey, D. D. were appointed a committee to do 
this work. It soon became obvious to this committee that a pub- 
lication of the meager Journals of the Convention would not do 
much to elucidate the history of the Church in Vermont. Under 
these circumstances, it was thought best to use the various mate- 
rial in hand, and quite liable to be lost, in the form of notes for 
the purpose of illustration. 

The greater part of the work was done before the death of Dr. 
Manser and was approved by him. Since that time the other 
members of the committee have been able to add some matter of 
value. 

This work has been done in the interest of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in Vermont. The committee are conscious that it 
is, in many respects, imperfect. Those who may glean, the same 
field, when they shall have passed away, may add some things of 
importance and correct some mistakes. They have their reward 
in the reflection that they have gathered material for a future his- 
tory and thus have contributed something for the benefit of the 
Church of the living God. 



A complete Index to this volume will be found at the end of the same. 



107447 



ADVERTISEMENT. 



The Publishers of this work deem it necessary, on account of 
the exceeding^ modesty of its compilers, to add, to the few words 
contained in the Preface, further words of their own, explanatory 
of its design and merits. 

Its design is to rescue and keep from oblivion most important 
and interesting information concerning the early establishment of 
the Church in the Diocese of Vermont. So much might be 
gathered from the Preface and Title Page. 

But that is by no means the whole story. The Facts and Docu- 
ments contained in this volume are of interest and value to every Church- 
man throughout the United States. The early Journals, contained 
in it, which have never before been published, are of the most 
meager character; but the patient research of our Compilers has 
brought to light Letters and Papers which seem not only to sup- 
ply the defects in the Journals, but also to bring out all the im- 
portant facts, and to illustrate even the character of the men who 
figured in those early days of our Church's history in this country 

These important and interesting papers can be found collected 
nowhere else. The labor of collecting and arranging them has 
been a labor of love — for the Church's sake — the Compilers look- 
ing for no other reward than the consciousness of having done it 
for the sake of their dear mother — The Church of the Living God. 

Consequently, just so soon as the sale of a sufficient number of 
copies to guaranty the expense of publication was secured, the 
manuscript was committed to the press. 

The Publishers, in common with all Churchmen who have 
seen the manuscript, are unwilling that the circulation of the vol- 
ume should be confined to the few who have subscribed. Arrange- 
ments have therefore been made, by which those who have had 
no opportunity to become acquainted with the design of publish- 
ing such a book may still supply themselves by timely application. 

Observe, we say timely. No owner of a copy will ever be in- 
duced, by anything but necessity, to sell it, after having once read 
it ; and when the few extra copies are taken up, the opportunity 
for securing one is lost, probably, forever, as the work is not ste- 
reotyped. 

It is the object, therefore, of this advertisement to say that, un- 
til the entire edition is exhausted, the publishers will fill orders as 
fast as received, provided they are accompanied by the money, 
and it is inserted here, that persons seeing the book and the adver- 
tisement together may have no excuse, if they wish for it, for neg- 
lecting the only measure for obtaining it. 



JOURNAL. 



1790. 

Arlington, Sept. 1790. 
Clerical and Lay Deputies : 

ARLINGTON : 

Zadoc Hard, Cai^eb Dayton, 

Nathan Canfield, Luther Stone. 

SANDGATE : 

Rev. James Nichols, Seth Bristol, 

Abraham Bristol, Enoch Basset. 

Elihu Andrews, 

MANCHESTER: 

Rev. Daniel Barber, Nathan Smith, 

Martin Powel, Esq., Jabez Hawley. 

Job GrIDDINGS, 

PAWLET : 

Ebenezer Cobb, Henry Wooster. 

WEATHERSFIELD : 

Jesse Gilbert. 

DORSET : 

Eleazer Baldwin. 

HINESBURGH : 

Andrew Burret, Esq. 

TINMOUTH : 

Elisha Hamilton. 
The Convention met at the Church : the Rev. Daniel 
Barber read prayers and the Rev. James Nichols preached a 
sermon. 



6 JOURJ^AL-1790. 

The Convention adjourned to meet again at 2 o'clock, 
P. M. 

The Convention met at 2 o'clock, P. M. and adjourned to 
the dwelling-house of Luther Stone, Esq., and proceeded to 
business. 

Mr. Eleazer Baldwin was chosen Chairman and Rev. 
Daniel Barber, Secretary, 

A letter from the Rev. Thomas Elison of Albany was read. 

The Convention requested Messrs. Griddings and Todd to 
endeavor to obtain an Act of the Legislature for the pur- 
pose of securing to the Church the possession of their Lands. 

Ordered, That the thanks of the Convention be properly 
returned to the Rev. Thomas Elison, for his friendly letter. 

Resolved, That the Rev. Thomas Elison be requested to 
preach at the opening of the next Convention. 

Adjourned sine die. 



The Lands contemplated in the action of this Convention were 
those reserved in " The New Hampshire Grants," made by Ben- 
ning Wentworth, the Governor of that Province, subsequent to 
1741. "The whole number of Grants amounted to one hundred 
and thirty-eight; and their extent was from Connecticut River to 
what was esteemed twenty miles east of Hudson's River, so far as 
that extended to the northward ; and after that as far west as the 
eastern shore of Lake Champlain." Williattis' Hist. Vt. vol. ii, c. i. 

" In the Grants of land that were made by Gov. Wentworth, 
there were three rights in each township, reserved for religious 
purposes. One to the Society for Propagating the Gospel in For- 
eign Parts ; one for a Glebe, designed for the use of an Episcopal 
Clergy ; a third for the first settled Minister, intended for his pri- 
vate property to encourage the settlement of a Minister in the 
new plantations." Williams' Hist. Vt., vol. ii, c. x. 

The Reservations in these Grants were made in the following 
form and words : " His Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq., a 
tract of land containing five hundred acres, as marked, B. W. in 
the plan, which is to be accounted two of the within shares; One 
whole share for the Incorporated Society for the Propagation of 



JOUEJ^AL-1790. 7 

the Gospel in Foreign Parts ; One share for a Glebe for the 
Church of England as by law established ; One share for the first 
settled Minister of the Gospel ; One share for the benefit of a 
School in said town." 

"Province of New Hampshire" date "recorded in the 

Book of Charters, page" . 

" Theodore Atkinson, Sec'ry." 

Thompson's Vermont, Part II, p. 224. 

The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts 
took an early and proper notice of these Grants. " The proceed- 
ings on the 16th of July 1762 and the 16th of March 1764, show 
an acceptance of the donation; and a resolution that agents be 
appointed to take charge of the patents and warrants for the land, 
and for such other purposes as the interests of the society may 
require." 

" At a meeting of the Society held December 17, 1773, the So- 
ciety agreed, that it be recommended to the Society to empower 
Mr. Cossitt to see that justice be done to the Society, in the allot- 
ment of Glebes, etc., in New Hampshire." 

" The Society resolved to agree that a letter of attorney be sent 
to the Governor of New Hampshire, empowering Mr. Cossitt to 
act in behalf of the Society with regard to these lands, and leav- 
ing blanks for persons whom the Governor may think proper to 
insert." 

"On the 20th of May 1785, a report was made to the Society 
relative to their lands, and the meeting resolved, that the Secre- 
tary do write to some one or more members of the Church of 
England in each of the States of America, in which the Society 
has any property, to take all proper care in securing said property ; 
and further to inform such persons that it is the intention of the 
Society to make over all such property to the use of the Episco- 
pal Church in that country, in whatever form, after communica- 
tion with the several governments, shall appear to be most effect- 
ual for that purpose." Peters' Reports, vol. iv, pp. 482, 483. 

Applications to the Propagation Society, for the conveyance of 
its lands in Vermont, had been made, by parties not now known 
before the Meeting of the Convention at Arlington. These were 
rejected by the Society in May 1790. Peters' Eep. vol. iv, p. 483. 



8 JOUBMAL-1790. 

In June 1785 the Legislature of Vermont held an adjourned 
Session at Norwich. On the 10th day of June, a Memorial, signed 
by John Wheelock, Esq., President of Dartmouth College and 
Moor's Charity School, praying, in behalf of said Institution, for a 
grant of land, was presented, read, and referred to a Committee of 
three on the part of the House to join a Committee of the Council 
" to take the same under consideration, and report their opinion 
to this House." On the part of the House, Col. Stephen R. Brad- 
ley of Westminster, Maj. Elisha Burton of Norwich and Samuel 
Knight, Esq. of Brattle borough, were chosen. Journal 1785, p. 2t). 

On the ilth of June, the above named Committee brought in a 
report, signed by Jonas Fay of the Council, recommending in 
consideration of the importance of Dartmouth College " to man- 
kind universally, and to this Commonwealth in particular," and of 
"the patriotic display of benevolence by the President, in his 
indefatigable exertions to diffuse all the benign influence of the 
institution through this State," the grant of 23,040 acres of land, 
"to be to the use and benefit of the same forever." This report 
being read and accepted, it was ordered. That the Petitioner have 
leave to bring in a Bill accordingly. Journal 1785, pp. 29, 30. 

Tuesday, June 14th. "A Bill, entitled, An Act granting 23,040 
acres of land to the Trustees of Dartmouth College, and the Pres- 
ident of Moor's Charity School, to and lor the use of said College 
and School, was brought in, agreeable to order, read, and accept- 
ed, and sent to the (jroveruor and Council for perusal and propo- 
sals of amendment." Journal 1785, p. 34. 

The Act, the title of which is given above, may be seen in Ver- 
mont State Papers, p. 497, 

In pursuance of this Act, a Charter was issued by Governor 
Chittenden, dated June 14th, 1785, for a tract of land six miles 
square. This Grant was named Wheelock, and is situated in Cal- 
edonia County. Vermont State Papers, 497. 

" The readiness with which so important a grant had been made 
to Dartmouth College, stimulated Dr. Wheelock to attend the 
next session of the Legislature, in October of the same year, to 
ask for a further and still larger one. The Legislature was then 
sitting at Windsor. An anonymous article appeared in the Ver- 
mont Journal, a newspaper published in that place, intended to 



JOVBKAL-1790. 9 

drive the Doctor from the ground, and to excite in the minds of 
the members a suspicion, at least, that the future wants of their 
own State might better receive their attention. The effect was 
favorable." Am. Quar. Reg., vol. xiii, p. 394. 

" The scheme of making Vermont in a further degree subsidi- 
ary to Dartmouth College, was not relinquished, and came up at 
the October session of the next year, 1786, in a new and very im- 
posing form. The Secretary of the Trustees, in a letter to Gov- 
ernor Chittenden, introduces the subject as one of the greatest 
consequence ' to the benefit and glory of the State,' and refers to 
President Wheelock as fully empowered to act on the matter in 
behalf of the Trustees. The President in his communications, 
after lauding ' the rapid progress of the State towards the summit 
of civilization and the arts, under the wise guidance of the Legis- 
lature,' and showing what an amount of clear gain would accrue 
to its citizens, in solid coin, from not having to spend any money 
in sustaining academies and colleges, having strengthened these 
points by the introduction of other related topics, proceeds to 
make in substance the following propositions : That the Legisla- 
ture sequester for the use of Dartmouth College the rights of land 
reserved in the New Hampshire Grants for the Propagation So- 
ciety, and for the purpose of Glebes, and those in the Vermont 
Grants for the use of Academies and a College, and that on their 
so doing, the Trustees were, in a reasonable time, to set up and 
maintain an Academy in each County with suitable instructors, 
tuition at the institutions and at Dartmouth College, or at a 
branch college to be set up within the State, if the Legislature 
shall ever think it necessary, to be free of charge for tuition to all 
students from the State. Moreover, if after accomplishing so 
much, any surplus revenue should accrue from the lands, it was 
to be applied for the support of free schools ; and the Legislature 
if judged best, might appoint Commissioners to see all the pro- 
ceeds properly applied. Should the Legislature not wish to go 
upon the entire plan, they might adopt a part of it, with a corres- 
ponding diminution of grants on their part, and benefits rendered 
by the other party." Am. Quar. Reg., vol. xiii, pp. 394, 395. 

The plan was reported upon by a joint Committee of the As- 
sembly and Council as deserving consideration, and one which 



10 JOUBKAL-1790. 

would beneficially affect the State in important particulars. The 
business was referred to the next Session of the Legislature, and 
the Letters and Report ordered to be published in " both the news- 
papers in this State, three weeks successively, at the cost of the 
State." The publication of these papers excited considerable at- 
tention, and drew forth sundry communications in prose and dog- 
gerel rhyme. Some of these were in favor of the scheme ; but 
most of them were decidedly against it. At the adjourned Ses- 
sion of the Legislature, in the ensuing February, the subject of 
Dartmouth College came up for consideration. It was referred 
to a committee with power to name Commissioners. This Com- 
mittee reported in favor of referring the matter to the next Ses- 
sion of the Legislature. This report was adopted. During the 
same day, however, this action was reconsidered by a vote of 
twenty-four to twenty-three. The affair of Dartmouth College 
was then disposed of by the resolution, " That the proposals from 
the College are such as cannot be accepted." Am. Quar. Reg., 
vol. xiii, p. 395 ; Church Review, vol. iv, pp. 582, 583. 

The Letters and Reports may be seen in the Vermont Journal, 
printed at Windsor, for January 1, 1787, et seq., and in the Ver- 
mont Gazette, printed at Bennington, for November 27, 1786, 
et seq. Articles by "A Vermont Parmer," "A Faithful Examiner," 
and "Peter Wimble" are in the Journal for Jan. 22d, Feb. 12th 
and 19th; and articles by " A Watchman," "An Inhabitant of 
Vermont" and by " John Wheelock," are in the Gazette for Feb. 
19th and 26th, 1787. 

Before the subject of Dartmouth College was taken up in the 
Legislature of 1787, the Hon. Nathaniel Chipman, the Chief Jus- 
tice of the State, and several other Episcopalians, prompted by 
the action of the Propagation Society in 1785, presented a Peti- 
tion to that honorable body, setting forth, that there are, within 
this State, many Rights of Land formerly granted to a Society in 
England by the name of the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, and that said Society have proposed to 
convey said Lands to a Society or Societies, to be incorporated 
under the direction of any State where such Lands may lie, and 
praying that a Society may be incorporated for the purpose of 
■communicating with the aforesaid Society in Great Britain, and 
of receiving from them a conveyance of the aforesaid Lands. 



JOUBJfAL-1790. 11 

This respectful Petition was not honored with a reference even ; 
but having been read it was dismissed. Church Review, vol. iv, 

p. 583. 

These, and various other applications from towns, served to 
turn the attention of the Legislature to the reserved rights m the 
New Hampshire grants and excite its cupidity. The desire for 
this property begat the purpose to take it. The Committee ap- 
pointed in October, 1786, on the subject of Dartmouth College, 
while they recommended the reference of it to the next Session of 
the Legislature, gave, in their report, this opinion respecting the 
fee of the lands granted to the Propagation Society : "In the 
opinion of this Committee, the lands formerly claimed by the So- 
ciety for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in con- 
sequence of the Revolution, are now become the property of the 
citizens of Vermont." And, in October, 1787, an Act was passed, 
authorizing the Selectmen of the several towns, to take care of 
and improve the Glebe and Society lands, for the space of seven 
years, and to apply the incomes to the improvements of the lands. 
In this Act an exception was .made of those Glebes which might 
be in the actual possession of Episcopal Ministers. This law, and 
the additional one of 1789, was but little attended to, and was 
not at all competent to the improvement of the lands or to render 
them beneEcial to the State, or to any valuable purpose. Wil- 
liams' Hist. Vt., vol. ii, c. x; Journal 1789, pp. 40, 50, 58. 

During the Session of the Legislature in October, 1789, " a Pe- 
tition from Matthew Lyon, praying a grant of a lot of land lying 
within this State, in the town of Fairhaven, belonging to the So- 
ciety for the Propapation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," was 
presented, read and referred to the next Legislature. Early in 
the Session of the Legislature in October, 1790, this Petition 
was taken up, considered and finally dismissed. Journal 1789, p. 
49; 1790, pp. 6, 16,32. 

With a view to relief from the restraint of the laws of 1787 and 
1789, the Committee of the Convention at Arlington was appoint- 
ed and requested to endeavor to obtain an Act of the Legislature 
for the purpose of securing to the Church the possession of their 
Lands. Mr. Todd was a Member of the Legislature from Arling - 
ton in 1790. But no effort appears, from the Journal of the 



12 JOURJ^AL-1791-2. 

Legislature for that year, to have been made in behalf of the in- 
terests of the Church. 



\ 



1791. 



Of the Convention of 1791, no record is known to exist. 
A Convention was probably held at Arlington on the 21st 
of September. In the Records of the Parish in that town, 
there is the following record of a Parish Meeting acting with 
reference to a Convention, holden on the sixth day of Sep- 
tember : " Voted, that Mr. Zadoc Hard be one of a Commit- 
tee to attend the Convention of the Episcopal Church to be 
held at Arlington on the twenty-first day of September, 
instant." 

" Voted, that Caleb Dayton be one to attend said Con- 
vention." 

" Voted, that Nathan Canfield, Esq., be one to attend 
said Convention." 

" Voted, that Tyrus Hurd be one to attend said Conven- 
tion." 

Something may have hindered the Delegates from the few 
widely scattered Parishes in the State, from meeting in 
numbers sufficient to organize and act as a Convention. 



1792. 

Manchester, Sept. 19, 1792. 
At a regular Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, holden at Manchester, on the 19th day of Septem- 
ber, 1792, the following gentlemen appeared as Members, 
produced their Credentials and took their seats, viz. 

SANDGATE : 

Rev. James Nichols, John Wadkins, 

Abel Bristol, Enoch Basset. 



JOUBJ^AL-1792. 13 

BENNINGTON : 

Thomas Bumford, Esq., Geo. McEleheron. 

ARLINGTON: 

Zadoo Hard, Andrew Hawley. 

MANCHESTER : 

Kev Daniel Barber, Jonathan Benedict, 

Job Giddings, Jabez Hawley. 

DORSET : 
Eleazer Baldwin, Samuel Marsh, Esq. 

Asa Baldwin, 

PAWLET: 

Benoni Smith, Ebenezer Cobb. 

Henry Wooster, 

CASTLETON : 

John Whitlock. 

The Convention proceeded to the house of public worship 
to attend Divine Service. The Rev. Mr. Catlin read prayers, 
and the Rev. Mr. Nichols preached. 

The Convention then proceeded to business. 

Mr. Eleazer Baldwin was chosen Chairman, and the Rev. 
Daniel Barber, Secretary. 



What was said and done in this Convention, the Record of 
which is so meagre, we have very scant means of knowing. It 
seems probable that the question of Church rights and property 
received due consideration. In October, only a few days after the 
time of this meeting, a " Petition of the Members of the Episcopal 
Church Convention," was presented to the Legislature then in ses- 
sion at Rutland, " praying that all the power and authority which 
the Selectmen have in their respective towns, over Glebe and So- 
ciety Lands in this State, in which there are no settled or offici- 
ating Clergvmen, given them by virtue of an Act passed by the 
Assembly, on the 26th of October, 1787, may, so far as it respects 
Glebe Lands, be transferred to the standing Church Committee, 
■ appointed bv their Convention, and their successors in office." 



14 JOURJfJ.L-1793. 

Having been read, this Petition was referred to a Committee, 
consisting of one member from each County, to join such Com- 
mittee as the Council shall appoint. Members chosen, Messrs. 
Josiah Wright, Pownal ; Arad Hunt, Hinsdale ; Eli Coggswell, 
Castleton ; Abel Thompson, Ferrisburgh ; William Chamberlin 
Peacham; Jonathan Hoit, St. Albans, and Benjamin Emmons, 
Woodstock. Journal 1792, pp. 13, 14. 

Thursday, Nov. 1st. "The Committee to whom was referred 
the Petition of the members of the Episcopal Church, reported a 
Bill, entitled ' An Act incorporating and giving certain powers to 
the Church Committee, appointed by the Protestant Episcopal 
Convention, within this State,' which was read, and ordered that 
the same be referred to the next session of the Assembly." Jour- 
nal 1792, p. 82. 

November 5th a Bill was introduced entitled "An Act directing 
the mode of securing lands within this State, granted by Charter 
to the first settled ministers of the Gospel, and to the Society for 
propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts." This Bill passed the 
first and second reading, and was then " referred to the next ses- 
sion of the Assembly." Journal 1792, pp. 93, 105. 

A Bill of a severer aspect, having the same design as the above, 
was brought before the Legislature at an earlier day than this. It 
was read once, laid on the table and never 'taken up. Journal 
1792, p. 82. 



1793. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met at Pawlet, September 18th, 1793. 
Members present : 

SANDGATE : 

Kev. James Nichols, Enoch Basset. 

Abraham Bristol, 

ARLINGTON : 

Zadoc Hard, Caleb Dayton. 

DORSET: 

Eleazer Baldwin, Jonathan Armstrong. 



JOURMAL-1793. 15 

MANCHESTER: 

Kev. Daniel Barbek, Truman Squires. 

Job Giddings, 

PAWLET : 
Capt. JONA. WiLLARD, EbENEZER CoBB. 

TINMOUTH: 

Ebenezer Mervin. 

FAIRHAVEN: 

Col. Matthew Lyon. 

CASTLETON : 

John Whitlock. 

WELLS : 

Jatson Taylor, David Lewis. 

bennington : 
William McElheron. 

SALISBURY : 

Stephen Hard, Esq. 

SHELBURN: 

Rev. Bethuel Chittenden. 

HARTLAND : 

Eev. J. C. Ogden. 

RUPERT: 

Grove Moore, Esq. 

The above named Members produced their Credentials 
and took their seats. 

Motioned by Col. Lyon, that John Prindle and Joshua 
Thompson of Granville be invited to take seats in this Con- 
vention. 

Eleazer Baldwin was chosen Chairman, and Rev. Daniel 
Barber, Secretary. 

Resolved, That the persons whose names are inserted in a 
Bill, lying before the General Assembly for the purpose of 
6btaining an Act of Incorporation, shall be the Standing 
Committee of this Convention for the year ensuing. 



16 JOVRKAL-1793. 

Resolved, That six persons be appointed a Committee for 
the purpose of recommending Candidates to the Bishop for 
Holy Orders. 

The following persons were appointed, viz. 

Rev. Daniel Barber, Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, 

Rev. Russel Catlin, Eleazer Baldwin, 

Rev. James Nichols, Zadoc Hard. 

Resolved, That the Rev. Daniel Barber and Col. Matthew 
Lyon be appointed members to attend the Greneral Conven- 
tion of the United States, should there be any convened this 
year. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a Committee to 
make application to the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, for a conveyance of their land»^ 
within this State ; viz. Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Col. Mat- 
thew Lyon, Ebenezer Marvin, Eleazer Baldwin, Truman 
Squier, Rev. James Nichols, Rev. Daniel Barber and Rev. 
J. C. Ogden. (a) 

The following gentlemen were appointed a Committee to 
nominate a Bishop to preside over the Church in this State; 
viz. Rev. James Nichols, Rev. J. C. Ogden, Rev. Bethuel 
Chittenden, Matthew Lyon, Truman Squier and George 
McEleheron. 

Adjoiirned till to-morrow Morning at 8 o'clock. 

Sept. 19th, 1793. The Convention opened according to 
adjournment. 

Mr. Job Giddings was appointed Treasurer, 

On motion. Resolved, That the thanks of this Conven- 
tion be returned to the Rev. J. C. Ogden for his Sermon 
delivered yesterday, and a Copy of the same requested for 
the Press. 

Voted, to elect the Eeverend Doctor Edward Bass, Hector 
of Newhuryport, to he Bishop of this State, (b) 

Daniel Chipman, Esq., member from Rutland, produced 
his Credentials and took his seat. 



JOVBKAL-lldS. 17 

Voted, That the Secretary subscribe a Letter to the 
Reverend Dr. Bass, in behalf of this Convention, notifying 
him of his election. 

(a) This Committee was appointed in anticipation that the Bill 
introduced into the Legislature of 1792 and referred to the session 
of this year, would become a Law. It does not appear, however, 
from the Journal of the Legislature for 1793, that the Bill was 
taken up for consideration. 

Something having reference to the Church lands was attempted 
at this meeting of the Legislature. October, 18th, 1793, Mr. 
Oliver Gallup of Hartland, " moved for liberty to bring in a Bill 
entitled, An Act in explanation of an act, passed October 26th, 
1787, entitled, ' An Act authorizing the Selectmen of the several 
towns in this State, to improve the Glebe and Society Lands.' " 
The Bill was brought in, read, laid on the table, and on the second 
reading, October 30th, it was dismissed. Journal 1793, pp. 71, 
153, 154. 

November 2d, the same gentlemen, with the intention of doing 
something in regard to the property of the Church, " moved for 
liberty to bring in a Bill, entitled. An Act to extend the opera- 
tion of an act, entitled, ' An Act authorizing the Selectmen in the 
several towns in this State to improve the Glebe and Society 
lands, etc., in certain cases therein mentioned." Leave was 
granted him, the Bill read and ordered to lie on the table. Jour- 
nal 1793, p. 192. 

This Bill was not, during the Session, taken from the table. 
The design of these movements, especially the last one, may have 
been to prevent the actual sequestration of these lands by the 
State, in the hope of obtaining a proper conveyance of the Propa- 
gation Rights to the Church in this State. 

The Committee of the Convention, although disappointed so 
far as respected any favorable action of the Legislature, appear to 
have done what they could to secure a conveyance of the Propa- 
gation Rights. " On the 16th of May, 1794, an application was 
made to the Society through the Bishop of New York, by the 
Episcopal Convention of Vermont, requesting the Society to con- 
vey, for the support of the Episcopal Church in that Diocese, the 



18 JOUR.YAL~1793. 

land held by the Society in Vermont, under grants from New 
Hampshire. The Committee of the Society made a report as fol- 
lows : The Committee agreed in opinion, that the Bishop of New- 
York be assured of the Society's readiness to concur in any meas- 
ures which can forward the establishment of an Episcopal Church, 
But having considered that former applications have been made 
from the State of Vermont, differing in their intentions from the 
present, which were rejected by the Society in May 1790; and at 
the same time Mr. Parker, of Boston, when he obtained a deed 
from the Society for the conveyance of their lands in New Hamp- 
.shire, had signified that he should not trouble them respecting 
Vermont, till he should know the operation of that deed ; and hav- 
ing never since heard from Mr. Parker on that subject, are of the 
opinion, that there is not sufficient ground for the Society to exe- 
cute the present deed." 4 Peters' Reports, 483. 

(b) Having been informed of his election, Dr. Bass, under the 
date of January 2d, 1794, returned the following answer, which 
must be regarded as an acceptance of the office of Bishop : 

" I apprehend that the Clergy and People of Vermont cannot 
reasonably support the immediate residence of a Bishop among 
them, but only temporary visitations, until he shall, by the in- 
crease of the lands, be enabled to live in his proper district." 

" As to my determination respecting the election, when I con- 
sider the importance of the station, and what a weight it must 
lay upon my mind, I cannot help hesitating." 

" I shall, however, accept of it, provided they do not require 
my constant residence. Wishing you to communicate their 
minds to me as to this particular, I may possibly, next spring or 
summer, repair to the proper place for consecration, if you and 
one or two others of the Clergy will engage to come down here, 
each one a week or two, to supply my place." 

" I shall write your Convention, and give them notice of ray 
intention, and of the exact time of my departure, and shall wish 
to have some of you here, the Sunday before my setting out." 

" All this, provided you consent to the above conditions." 

The foregoing paragraphs are certified to be a true copy of the 
Letter of Dr. Bass by the Rev. J. C. Ogden, to whom the original 
was addressed. 



J0VEKAL-17d3. 19 

There may have been other communications from Dr. Bass ; 
but at this distance of time, we have no knowledge of any. As 
the course taken by the Churchmen of Vermont, soon after the 
reception of the above communication, must ever appear hasty 
and disrespectful, it is fit to give here a brief account of this ven- 
erable and devout man. 

Edward Bass — the grandson of Samuel Bass who came to this 
country about the year 1630, — was born at Dorchester, Massachu- 
setts, November 23d, 1726. He graduated, with honor, at Harvard 
College, 1774. During the first three years after his graduation, 
he was employed in teaching school and in theological reading. In 
1747, he took his second degree, and, from that time, until 1751, 
he resided at the College, pursuing his theological studies. In 
the meantime he received a license to preach in the Congrega- 
tional denomination. In 1752, he left that sect and joined the 
Episcopal Church. In the early part of the same year, at the re- 
quest of the Church in Newbury, he went to England for Ordina- 
tion. He was ordained Deacon, on the 24th of May, by Bishop 
Sherlock. Having subsequently received Priest's Orders, he re- 
turned in the autumn of that year, and took charge of St. Paul's 
Church, Newbury. In the time of the Revolution, Mr. Bass, with 
much reluctance conformed, in the use of the Liturgy, so far as 
respected the King and the Royal Family, to the wishes of his 
Parish and the public sentiment of New England. The Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel at once withdrew his salary as 
a Missionary. By the aid of generous friends, however, he con- 
tinued in the quiet discharge of his ministerial duties. 

On the 4th day of June, 1789, at a meeting of six Presbyters, 
including Mr. Bass, belonging to Massachusetts and New Hamp- 
shire, held at Salem, Mr. Bass was elected Bishop over the 
Churches in these States. Application for his consecration was 
made to the Bishops of Connecticut, New York and Pennsylvania. 
The election being irregular, and the Churches in those States 
not being in union with the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, the papers relating to it were laid before the Gen- 
eral Convention at Philadelphia, July 30th, 1789, by Bishop 
White. After due consideration, the matter was disposed of, Au- 
gust 5th, by several Resolutions, offered by the Rev. Dr. Smith of 



20 FACTS AJTD DOCUMEXTS~1794.. 

Maryland. By the 4th one, the three Bishops were requested to 
comply with the prayer of the Clergy of Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire for the consecration of Mr. Bass ; but that before they 
should do so, a Convention as proposed by Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire, of the Churches in New England and of the three 
States above named, with the Bishops of the same, should meet to 
settle certain Articles of Union and Discipline among all the 
Churches. This Convention met at Philadelphia, September 29th, 
1789. The Churches of Connecticut, Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire, by their Deputies, formally agreed and subscribed to 
the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church, on the 2d of 
October, 1789. But no steps seem subsequently to have been 
taken for the consecration of Mr. Bass. In July 1789, Mr. Bass 
received the degree of Doctor in Divinity from the University 
of Pennsylvania. September 19th, 1793, Dr. Bass was elected 
Bishop of Vermont. No means, however, appear to have been 
taken to secure his consecration. As the Church in Vermont 
had not as yet adopted the Constitution of the Church in this 
country, it could not have taken place. In the early part of 
1796, Dr. Bass was duly elected Bishop of Massachusetts, and on 
the 7th of May, he was consecrated in Christ Church, Philadel- 
phia by Bishops White, Provoost and Claggett. This office he 
held a little more than six years, retaining, also, his Rectorship. 
He died September lOth, 1803, in the 74th year of his age, and 
the 51st of his Ministry of the Gospel of Christ. 



1794. 

FACTS AND DOCUMENTS. 
The year 1794 was one of great and critical interest to the 
Episcopal Church in Vermont. Unfortunately, no connected and 
authentic record of what was done in the Convention, or Conven- 
tions, of that year, was made and preserved. From some ascer- 
tained facts, and documents of various kinds, however, some 
things may be gathered, possessing much historical value. For 
the statement of these facts, and the due preservation of these 
documents, this place may be at once fit and convenient. 



FA CIS AMD D OCVMEKTS-1794. 21 

February 27th, 1794, a Special Convention of the Diocese was 
holden at Manchester. Of this Convention Eleazer Baldwin was 
President, and the Rev. Daniel Barber, Secretary. In this Con- 
vention, a little less than two months after the Rev. Dr. Bass had, 
in effect, accepted the office of Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont, 
Col. John A. Graham, of Rutland, nominated for Bishop a rel- 
ative and friend of himself, The Rev. Samuel Peters, LL. D. 
This nomination was received with so much favor that Dr. Peters 
was elected. Judging from two phrases in the letter of Dr. 
Peters, accepting the office of Bishop over the Church in Ver- 
mont — ^'the Convention had pretty unanimously chosen we," and ''the 
want of unanimity in the Church''— we naturally conclude that 
there was opposition to this course of action in the Convention 
and in the Diocese, and that Dr. Peters had been informed in 
regard to it. From one of the letters of Dr. Peters, addressed 
to Truman Squier, hereafter %nserted, we learn that the Rev. 
Bethuel Chittenden was opposed to the election and consecration 
of Dr. Peters, and that he wrote to him^ stating, with frankness, 
the reasons of his opposition. The aged and respected widow 
of Mr. Squier, still living in Bennington, resident in Manchester 
at the time of this Convention, states that the Rev. J. C. Ogden, 
who was her guest during the time of its session, was likewise 
much opposed to the election of Dr. Peters. Probably he took 
the same view of the affair as that entertained by Mr. Chittenden. 

The same lady states there was much active exertion made by 
the relatives and old friends of Dr. Peters, to effect his election. 
Col. Jarvis of Toronto, Canada, the son-in-law of Dr. Peters, a 
man of good address, wealth and station, was present at this 
Convention — likewise her guest — and was very active and earnest 
in promoting the interest of his father. By his influence and 
that of others a majority of votes was secured in favor of Dr. 
Peters. 

The Rev. Dr. Peters left this country in September, 1774, and 
at the time of his election by the Convention, was residing in 
London. Col. Graham was sent to England to secure the Conse- 
cration of Dr. Peters in that country. From documents, inserted 
in the sequel, it appears that Col. Graham was, also, appointed, 
by the Standing Committee of the Convention of 1793, Agent 



22 FA CTS AMD DO CUMEMTS-179Ji,. 

and Attorney of the Church in Vermont to procure a conveyance 
of the land of the Propagation Society within this State, to him- 
self and certain other gentlemen. 

As Col. Graham, after his arrival in England, gave attention 
first to the Society lands, vpe may as well insert first what papers 
we have respecting his negotiations with the Society, and, after- 
wards, various documents in respect to the desired consecration of 
Dr. Peters. 

The following power of attorney was given to Col. Graham, by 
the Rev. Daniel Barber, Secretary of the Convention. 

" State of Vermont: 

These certify that the honorable Committee of the Episcopalian 
Convention of the State of Vermont, have nominated, constituted 
an d appointed John A. Graham, Esq. Counsellor at Law, of Rut 
land, in said State, their Agent and Attorney to Great Britain, to 
apply to the Society, known by th^ appellation of the Society for 
the Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, and to treat with 
them relative t(^ their lands lying in the said State of Vermont, 
and, in general, to negotiate and transact such business in the 
premises, as he, in his wisdom, shall think proper, and for the 
benefit of the Episcopal Churches in the said State. Credit and 
good faith is therefore requested to be given to him accordingly. 

Given under my hand and seal, at Rutland this 15th day of 
October in the year of our Lord, 1794. 
DANIEL BARBER, 

Secretary of the Convention of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont." 

" By his excellency the Governor of the State of Vermont, — 
To all who shall see these presents, 

Greeting : 
These certify that Daniel Barber, signer of the within certif- 
icate, is Secretary to the Convention of the Episcopal Church in 
this State. In testimony whereof we have caused the Seal of 
this State to be affixed, this 15th day of October A. D. 1794. 

THOMAS CHITTENDEN. 

By the Governor, 

Joseph Fay, Secretary." 

Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 18, (1796.) 



FA CTS AKD B CUMEKTS-1794. 23 

The following letter was addressed to the Rev. Dr. Morice by- 
Col. Graham immediately after his anival in England, respecting 
the lands of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel : 

" Westminster, Feb. 4th, 1795. 
Reverend Sir: 

The Committee of the Episcopalian Convention of the State 
of Vermont, having by their letter of Attorney properly authen- 
ticated, appointed the Subscriber their Agent and Attorney to 
apply to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts, and to treat with them relative to their lands lying in the 
said State of Vermont, and to negotiate and transact such busi- 
ness in the premises as shall be thought proper for the benefit of 
the Episcopal Churches in said State, he embraces the earliest 
opportunity of making the following communication, which he 
requests may be laid before the Society. 

About 30 years ago, while the district of country, now known 
by the name of the State of Vermont, was a part of the British 
Colony of New-Hampshire, Benning Wentworth, Esq. then Gov- 
ernor of the said Colony of Xew-Hampshire, in the Grants which 
he made of townships of land, in the district of country aforesaid, 
by authority derived from his present Majesty, reserved to the 
Society aforesaid, certain portions of land, in each town, for the 
purpose of supporting the Church of England in the then Colony 
of New-Hampshire. 

In consequence of the political events which have taken place 
between that country and this, and the lapse of time since the 
Society's title commenced, a powerful party has been formed in 
the Legislature of the State, with professed views to defeat the 
title derived under the original Grant. As the Society have 
adopted no measures, during the long time which has elapsed, to 
occupy and improve the lands, the Episcopalian Convention, and, 
indeed, all friends to the Church of England in that country, are 
under strong apprehensions that the profits of these lands will be 
lost to the Society, and diverted to other purposes, unless immedi- 
ate measures are taken to prevent it. The undersigned Agent 
will take the liberty of stating for the consideration of the Soci- 
ety, the mode of procedure which the Convention, for whom he 



24 FA CTS AJfB D OCUMEJfTS-1794. 

has the honor to act, conceived would be most conducive to the 
interests of the Church of England in the State of Vermont, 
under the existing circumstances. 

First ; The Society to release and quit-claim to the undersigned 
Agent, Dr. Peters, the Bishop elect, and William Hull, Esq. of 
Newton, in the State of Massachusetts, all their right and title to 
the lands aforesaid, to the use and for the support of the Episco- 
pal Churches in the said State of Vermont. 

Secondly ; The Society to execute a power of Attorney to the 
Trustees aforesaid, to prosecute and defend all suits, in the name 
of the Society, which may be instituted relative to their lands. 
The Trustees likewise to be authorized to make any compromise 
with the State of Vermont, or any individuals respecting the 
same. And if any compromise should be deemed necessary, and 
it should be thought requisite to relinquish any part of the lands 
to the State, or to any individuals who have improved or possessed 
them, an authority to be given to the Trustees to release to the 
State, or to individuals all the Society's title to such part as shall 
be thus relinquished for the purpose of obtaining an indisputable 
title to the residue. The Trustees likewise to be authorized to 
sell absolutely such part of the lands as may be necessary to 
defray the expenses of suits, etc. unless the Society should devise 
some other mode of defraying the expenses. In case the former 
mode should be adopted, the Trustees to indemnify the Society 
against any cost, charge, or expense which may arise, either by 
prosecuting or defending suits, or by their services in the premises. 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Agent. 

To Dk. Mokice, Secretary to the S. P. G. F. P." 

Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 19, 20, ( 1796). 

Answer of Dr. Morice to the foregoing letter : 

" GowER Street, No. 53, Feb. 21, 1795. 
Sir : — I did not fail to communicate to the Society at their Anni- 
versary yesterday, the application you left with me in writing, for 
their relinquishing all their right and title which they may have 
to certain lands in Vermont. But as there was much other neces- 



FA CTS AKB D CUMEJfTS-1794. 25 

sary business, which took up their whole time, the discussion of 
that business was postponed to their next Meeting in March. 
I am, Sir, your respectful, humble servant, 

WILLIAM MORICE, Secretary." 

Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 20. 

» Dr. Morice's compliments to Col. Graham, and acquaints him 
that he laid his papers before the Society at their meeting on Fri- 
day last, and that the Resolution of the Society was, not to com- 
ply with the proposals respecting the lands in Vermont. 

GowER Street, March 23, 1795." 
Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 20. 

Much obscurity rests on many points relative to the election of 
the Rev. Samuel Peters, LL. D., to the office of Bishop over the 
Episcopal Church in Vermont. At this distance of time, owing 
to the negligence of parties who took part in this transaction, in 
regard to records, letters and other papers, it may be found im- 
possible to give a connected and satisfactory account. The Rev. 
A. B. Chapin, D. D.,in a letter published in Sprague's Annals of 
the American Episcopal Pulpit, makes the following statement : 
'•After the Organization of the Protestant Episcopal Church ui the 
United States, and the Consecration of Bishop Seabury in Scot- 
land, and three Bishops in England for this country, the Episcopa- 
lians' in Vermont united with a body of those not previously of that 
communion, and elected Dr. Peters Bishop of that State." For the 
support of this assertion. Dr. Chapin gives no reference. He may 
have had what he deemed authority for it. It is a pity he with- 
held it. After all, the assertion above made may rest on this pas- 
sage in the life of Hugh Peters, written by Samuel : " After the 
Revolutionary War, the Episcopalians who had settled in the 
State of Verdmont, with the Presbyterians. Methodists and Puri- 
tans, unanimously elected the Rev. Samuel Peters, LL. D., their 
Bishop, and invited him to accept the office and return from Eng- 
land to his native country." Life of Hugh Peters, p. 94. 

How much of sober truth there may be in this sentence, and how 
much of hyperbole, one may not now be able to say. Very few of 
the present generation are aware that there ever was in Vermont 



26 FA CTS AJVD D OCUMEJ\'TS-1794. 

such a reign of peace, and that the parties named above once 
joined with Episcopalians, especially in 1794, in the election of 
the Rev. Samuel Peters, LL. D., to be their Bishop ! We vpait 
for light. 

No copy of the Letter of the Rev. Mr. Barber to Dr. Peters, 
informing him of his election, is known to exist. The general 
tenor and purport of it, however, may be gathered from the fol- 
lowing reply to it by Dr. Peters, accepting the office to which he 
had been elected. The other letter alluded to below seems to 
have been complimentary. 

" No. 22, York Street, Westminster, 

July 17, 1794. 
Reverend and Dear Brother: 

The 5th day of July current I had the honor of receiving 

your polite, communicative, and friendly letter, dated Manchester 

in the State of Vermont, the 27th of last February. 

At present I can only thank you for the communications re- 
specting the prospects you have in the State of Vermont of seeing 
an increase of the Protestant Episcopal Church ; and that, to 
promote it, the Convention had pretty unanimously chosen me to 
be their Bishop. 

This event ( though unexpected to me) I view as the work of 
God, and could have no objection to go over and spend my remain- 
ing days amongst my friends in my native country, to build up 
the Church of Christ, for which I have laboured and suffered all 
my life, but the fear of the want of unanimity in the Church, 
which naturally leads to schism ; and from my imperfections and 
insufficiency to fill the Episcopal Chair in a State famed for wis- 
dom and learned men. 

However, depending on God, the wisdom of the wise, the char- 
ity and prayers of all, I have determined to accept your election, 
as the call of Jesus Christ the Lord. To this purpose I have 
written my letter, addressed to all the Churches in Vermont, of 
even date with this, which you, as Secretary of the Convention, 
will have the goodness to communicate to that Venerable Body 
first, and they to the Churches spread over the State of Vermont, 
in such manner as you and they shall judge to be most proper. 

I must now inform you that I cannot go over to you, nor have 



FACTS AMD DOCUMEJfTS-1794- 27 

Consecration here, nntill the letter of the Convention to the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury ( en polsent, very handsome and full ) comes 
here with the seal of your State, or of the Notary Public, certify- 
ing the existence of the Protestant Episcopal Convention of Ver- 
mont, and that they have elected the Rev. Samuel Peters, LL. D. 
to be Bishop of Vermont, as appears by the signatures of the 
Committee of the Convention, together vpith its President and its 
Secretary : in testimony of which I have hereunto affixed the seal 
of, etc., etc. 

Had you thought of this canonical rule last February, and sent 
the seal fixed to either of your letters. No. 1 or 2, addressed to 
the Archbishop of Canterbury, I could have seen you before next 
Christmas. But now I must be deprived of that pleasure untill 
the winter shall be past ; at which time I shall set out, in hopes 
of seeing and blessing you before I die. 

The letter addressed to me from the Committee of Convention, 
dated last February, honored me, and secures my gratitude and re- 
spect. I wish that I was better able to support their high esteem 
and expectations; but so far as my abilities fall short, so far, I 
trust, my zeal and labours in my station will exceed their hopes. 

Evident is the necessity of a Bishop resident, to set things in 
order, and to promote harmony in the Churches. And I have no 
doubt of receiving every respect due to the sacred office or myself, 
both in a temporal and spiritual manner : yet I feel it to be my 
duty to tell you a circumstance possible to happen. As soon as I 
am consecrated Bishop of Vermont, a foreign State, my present 
support from this Government may be witheld : — Should this 
event take place, I shall have no resource but what shall arise 
from the Churches in the State of Vermont now in their infancy. 
The fact is, I ' want but little here below, nor want that little 
long.' My mind and merits claim no more; yet the dignity of 
the station which you have given me, and the primitive hospital- 
ity belonging to the Episcopal Chair, demand your and my atten- 
tion ; lest my reputation and the fashion of religion dwindle away 
through my poverty in the highest office of Christ's Church. 

Should the English Bishops neglect to consecrate me, because 
you have three Bishops in the States of America already, conse- 
crated by the English Bishops, and plead the limitation of the 



28 FACTS ANB I>OCVMEMTS-1794. 

Act of Parliament for their neglect, I shall apply for consecration 
to the College of Bishops in Scotland ; because your three Bishops 
reside too remote from one another, and from the State of Ver- 
mont, to be convened by me. 

I am, with perfect esteem and sincerity. Reverend and Dear 
Sir, your and the Convention's most honored and most humble 
servant, SAMUEL PETERS. 

The Rev. Mr. Daniel Barber, Secretary of the Convention of 
the Episcopal Church of Vermont, and Rector of Manchester and 
Pavvlet." 

Sprague's Ann. of the Am. Ep. Pulpit, pp. 196, 197, 198. 

The letter following, alluded to in the preceding, was addressed 
by Dr. Peters to the Churches which had elected him to the office 
of Bishop. 
" To the Churches of Christ spread abroad in the State of Vermont, 

mercy, peace, and love he multiplied: 

Until I come, give attendance to reading, prayer and faith. 
When present with you, by the grace of God, I will lead you 
through the wilderness of life, up to a world that knows no sor- 
row. I will guide you with mine eye, and feed your lambs and 
sheep with bread more durable than the everlasting hill. 

While absent from you in body, I am present with you in 
mind, thanking (irod always in every prayer of mine, and making 
request with joy for your fellowship in the Gospel of His Son ; 
that you may be of good cheer, and overcome a world yielding no 
content, the only wealth of man ; and that you may know to be 
abased, and how to abound ; every where and in aU things to be 
instructed to obey the laws of Christ. 

The spirit which heals all our infirmities, no doubt led you to 
glorify God in me, when you appointed the least of all saints to 
fill the highest station in the Church of Jesus Christ; duty and 
inclination (with feeble blood flowing in my veins) inspire my soul 
to seek and do you good in that sacred office to which you have 
invited me ; being confident that you will receive me with all 
gladness, and hold me in reputation for the work of Christ, which 
brought me near to death, and shall finally make you my glory 
and joy. 



FA CTS ANB D O CUMEJ^rS-1794. 29 

Your preferring me to my superiors, both in spiritual and liter- 
ary attainments, honours me most unexpectedly, and demands my 
best returns of gratitude and labours of love. 

Should Providence conduct me over the dangers of the sea to 
my native shore, and give me the blessing of seeing again my 
long absent friends, I shall rejoice as Simeon did at his vision, 
and with him say, ' Lord, now let me depart in peace — for mine 
eyes have seen thy salvation.' Though I may blush when you 
discover my improvements not adequate to your expectations 
and my opportunities in this Isle of wisdom and learning. 

Should my insufficiency in spiritual and scientific knowledge 
appear too manifest among you, my zeal and labours in the vine- 
yard of the Lord shall, I trust, be your pride and boast. In this 
hope, and resting on the candour, order, morality, learning, piety 
and religion of those over whom I am well chosen to preside I 
shall, with some degree of confidence, undertake the charo-e and 
claim the wisdom of the wise to enlighten my understanding, and 
the charity and prayers of all to remove my wants, and to lessen 
my manifold imperfections. 

Whenever I come to you, it will be in the fulness of the bless- 
ing of the Gospel of God. I beseech you, therefore, Brethren, for 
Christ's sake and the love of the Spirit, that you strive together 
in your prayers to God for me, that I may come unto you with 
joy, and may with you be refreshed. 

' Be ye wise unto that which is good, and simple concerning evil.' 
The Churches of Christ salute you. Salute one another with 
faith and love. 

I salute you all with the peace of God, which passeth all under- 
standing; and in the mystery of the everlasting God made known 
for the obedience of faith. 

'To God only wise, be glory through Jesus Christ, forever. 
Amen-' 

Dearly beloved Brethren, whether absent or present, believe 
me to be, with all sentiments of respect and fidelity, 
Your servant in Christ, 

SAMUEL PETERS. 
York Street, Westminster, London, July 17tli, 1794." 
SpragTie's Ann. of Am. Ep. Pulpit, pp. 198, 199. 



30 FA OTS AMD D O CUMEKTS-1794. 

The following documents respect the effort which was made 
to secure the Consecration of Dr. Peters in England. 
"To the Most Reverend Father in God, t/o/m, Lord Arch-Bishop 
of Canterbury, and Metropolitan of all England ; 

May it please your Grace, — 
The Convention of the Episcopal Church in the State of Ver- 
mont have elected the Rev. Dr. Samuel Peters of London, to the 
office of Bishop, and hereby request that he may be commissioned 
and duly authorized to discharge all the duties of that sacred 
function among us. 

When we consider the dignity of the station and its important 
uses, we are deeply impressed with the nature of the business. 
We have now undertaken to add another to the Apostolic Order. 
In this election, we have sought a gentleman, whom we view as 
worthy of the place, in whose piety, learning and abilities we do 
confide, and have endeavored to conduct his election with all that 
prudence, caution and candour, which become us. 

The benevolent provision made by Act of Parliament for fur- 
nishing the States with the succession of the Apostolic urder, and 
the indulgent attention of the Arch- Bishops and Bishops, in con- 
sequence, to the appointments already made by the Conventions 
of the Churches in the other States, leads us to hope for a contin- 
uance of their goodness. 

As much loss of time may be prevented, if Dr. Peters receives 
Consecration in England, we hope to be indulged in this request, 
which will be the more acceptable to us, as it will afford us an 
opportunity of expressing our affectionate attachment to the 
Church Clergy of England, and enjoying an additional instance of 
their continued attachment and regard to the prosperity of the 
Church in these States, which descended from England, and by 
her long continued cares has been cherished to respectability. 

We are with all due veneration, Your Grace's most devoted 
and obedient servants. 

(Signed) Eleazer Baldwin, Pres. by order of the Convention. 

(Singed) Daniel Barber, Secretary. 
Dated at Rutland, Oct. 15th, 1794. 

(Signed) James Nichols, Bethuel Chittenden, John C. Ogden, 
Ebenezer Marvin, Truman Squier," Committee. 



FA CTS AKB D OCUMEMTS-1794. 31 

" A trne Copy of the doings of the Convention holden at Man- 
chester, February the 27th day, A. D. 1794. 

Attest: DANIEL BARBER, Secretary." 
Rural Mag. vol. ii, pp. 72, 73. 

"To the Most Reverend Father in God, John, Lord Arch- 
Bishop of Canterbury, and Metropolitan of all England, 

May it please your Grace, 

We are informed our former Credentials, praying for the Con- 
secration of the Rev. Mr. Samuel Peters to the office of Bishop, 
had the misfortune to miscarry going to London. We trust and 
hope this will be our apology for troubling your Grace with the 
copies of what was formerly recommended and forwarded. 

The Hon. John Graham will wait on your Grace, with these 
papers, by the leave of Providence. We beg leave to inform 
your Grace that Col. Graham is a gentleman of respect in the 
States and whose friendship is of importance to the Church. We 
are, may it please your Grace, Your Grace's most devoted, humble 
servants. 

JAMES NICHOLS, DANIEL BARBER, 

EBENEZER MARVIN, TRUMAN SQUIER. 

Rutland, Oct. 14th, 1794." 

[seal.] "By his Excellency, Thomas Chittenden, Esq., Gov- 
ernor, Captain General, and Commander in Chief in and over the 
State of Vermont — 

To all who shall see these. 

Greeting : 
Know ye that Eleazer Baldwin, who has signed the within rec- 
ord, is president of the Convention of the Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont, and that Daniel Barber is Secretary, and that 
James Nichols, Bethuel Chittenden, John C. Ogden and Russell 
Catlin are clerks, and Ebenezer Marvin and Truman Squier, gen- 
tlemen and laymen, are a Standing-Committee of the said Church. 
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto caused the seal of the 
State to be affixed in council, at the council chamber at Rutland, 
this I4th day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand 



32 FA CTS AKD D OCUMEJ^TS-1794. 

seven hundred and ninety four, and in the nineteenth year of the 
independence of this and the United States of America. 

THOMAS CHITTENDEN. 
By the Governor. 

Joseph Fay, Secretary." 

Rural Mag. vol. ii, p. 73. 

Soon after his arrival in England Col. Graham had the follow- 
ing correspondence with the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury with ref- 
erence to the Consecration of the Rev. Dr. Peters. As it forms a 
part of the early history of the Church in Vermont, is very seldom 
met with and is referred to in the action of the Special Conven- 
tion held at Rutland Nov. 13th, 1795, it is here inserted. 

"No. 340, Strand, Feb. 14, 1795. 
My Lord : 

Having arrived in London, as Agent of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the State of Vermont, in America, I am requested 
to wait on the Rev. Dr. Samuel Peters, Bishop elect of Vermont, 
for his Conseci'ation by the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury and other 
Bishops in England. 

I therefore take the earliest opportunity to acquaint your Grace 
of my arrival, and pray your Grace to appoint a time, when I 
shall have the honor to lay before your Grace, the documents and 
papers to me intrusted for that purpose. 

I have the honor to be, with every sentiment of respect. My 
Lord, your Grace's most obedient and most humble servant. 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Agent. 

His Grace, the Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury." 
Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 74. 

"No. 340, Strand, Feb. 14, 1795. 
My Lord : 

I had the honor to write you on the 14th inst., respecting 
some part of the business of my mission from the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont, in America, praying 
your Lordship to appoint a time, when I should have the honor 
to lay before you the documents and papers entrusted to my 
charge, for the Consecration of the Rev. Dr. Samuel Peters, 
Bishop elect for that State. 



FACTS AJfD DOCUMEMTS-1794- 33 

I humbly implore your Lordship's pardon for addressino- you 
the second time so soon on the subject. As I was requested to 
lay them before your Grace for the purposes aforesaid, and not 
having the honor to hear from your Grace, conscience to the trust 
in me reposed by the Church, bids me solicit your Grace again in 
the premises. 

The necessity of my business urges me to leave London for 
America by the 1st of April. 

Knowing the honor that will redound to our infant State and 
Church, in having Dr. Peters consecrated by your Grace and the 
Lord Bishops of England in preference to any other part of the 
world, the Church in the State of Vermont hope and pray that 
your Grace will gratify them in their desire; and as in duty 
bound will ever pray. 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Agent. 

His Grace, the Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury." 
Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 74. 

"Lambeth Palace, Feb. 24, 1795. 
Sir: 

I have been favored with your letters of the 14th and 23d 
inst., and am sorry I have not been sooner able to name a time 
for the interview which you do me the honor to desire. I can 
now reserve the hour between 11 and 12, on Thursday next for 
that purpose, and shall be glad of the pleasure of seeing you any 
part of it that may best suit your convenience. 

I am. Sir, your most oht. humble Servant. 

J. CANTUAR. 

Col. J. Gkaiiam." 

Rural Magazine, vol. ii, p. 74. 

"Feb. 26th, 1795. 

The undersigned Agent according to the appointment of his 
Grace, the Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterburj^, this day waited upon 
his Lordship at Lambeth Palace, on the business of the Conse- 
cration of the Rev. Dr. Peters, the Bishop elect of Vermont, when 
the business was opened. 

His Grace first objected, because the Act of Parliament, passed 
in January, 1786, was limited to a College, that is, three Bishops 



34 FA CTS AJfD D CUMEMTS-1794. 

for the United States of America ; and his Grace having already- 
consecrated three Bishops, — one for New York, one for Pennsyl- 
vania, and one for Virginia, the Act had been fulfilled. The 
Agent desired to know by what rule of construction said Act 
could be considered as a limited Act to numbers and countries. 

His Grace replied that he had left the Act thus open, lest one 
of the three Bishops to be consecrated for the States of America 
should die before they could meet to consecrate a fourth. 

The Agent then wished to know why words in the Act of Par- 
liament should not be considered as the only meaning thereof. 

His Grace replied that he had himself brought the Bill into the 
House of Lords, and had moved to have it passed into a Law ; 
and the Earl of Effingham demanded to be informed of the design 
of the Bill ; whereupon he ( meaning his Grace, the Lord Arch- 
Bishop of Canterbury,) explained it thus : "The design of the Bill 
is to enable the English Bishops to consecrate a College of 
Bishops for the United States of America." The Bill then 
passed into an Act without noticing the explanation of it by his 
Grace, and that his explanation of the Act was the only meaning 
of it ; and if he should consecrate a fourth Bishop for the States 
of America, he must contradict his own explanation, and might 
be called on to consecrate a fifth, sixth, seventh and so on, ad 
infinihmi, and the English Bishops would never be free from the 
trmhle of consecrating Bishops for the States of America. 

The Agent then begged his Lordship's indulgence and said, in 
his opinion as a Lawyer, the Act was indefinite as to numbers 
and countnes, and that the explanation of the Bill in the House 
of Lords, made no part of the Act. 

His Grace replied that no Lawyer could understand the spirit 
and meaning of the Act, and that he alone was capable of explain- 
ing its real meaning. 

The Agent then said, your Grace's successors in office will be 
bound by the Act itself, without any reference to your Lordship's 
verbal explanation, unless they should have the spirit of Daniel 
to divine and develope the secret meaning. 

His Grace then assigned a second reason, to wit; — a Canon 
made at Philadelphia by a Convention of Episcopalians of sundry 
States, in words to this effect: "The Bishops of this Convention 



s FACTS AKB BOCTJMEXTS-1794. 35 

shall not consecrate any Bishop, unless the person consecrated 
has resided and officiated as a clergyman in one of the States, 
three years prior to his being consecrated." His Grace said he 
could not consecrate the Bishop elect of Vermont, who had resided 
the last twenty years in England, without violating said Canon. 

The Agent replied — My Lord, your Grace doth not belong to 
that Convention, nor doth the Church in Vermont belong to it ; 
and though Dr. Peters hath resided the la&t twenty years in 
England, yet he has resided and officiated as a Clergyman about 
fourteen years in Connecticut; therefore the Canon cannot mili- 
tate against his being consecrated, as the Canon requires only 
three years residence 'prior to his consecration, and not the three 
last years previous to his consecration. 

His Grace next objected and said, "if I should consecrate a 
fourth Bishop for the States of America, I should invade the 
rights and offend the College of Bishops of America." 

The Agent replied that the three Bishops viz. Dr. Provoost, 
Dr. White, and Dr. Madison are Bishops in their respective 
Dioceses; but not Bishops of America or United States; nor 
has there been a Bishop of the United States since the indepen- 
dence of America. The said three Bishops in the three States, 
My Lord, are not like an Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, whose 
power pervades all countries in his Majesty's dominions ; but the 
ubiquity of all other Bishops is confined to their respective Dio- 
ceses. Therefore, as the said three Bishops in America are 
located in three States and the fifteen States have no Arch-Bishop, 
the Church of Vermont is no more subject to said three Bishops 
than to the Bishops of England and Ireland ; and in fact the 
Church of Vermont have no legal claim on the three Bishops, in 
the three States of America, while they hold a right to the bene- 
dictions of the English Bishops by a gracious Act of Parliament, 
passed January, 1786. These things being considered. My Lord, 
how is it possible for the said three American Bishops to be 
offended with the English Bishops for consecrating a Bishop for 
Vermont ? Since it is true that the American Bishops have no 
legal rights in Vermont, therefore their rights in or to Vermont 
cannot be invaded by the English or any other Bishops. Also, 
My Lord, the three American Bishops, who live very remote from 



36 FACTS AKB DOCUMEKTS-1794' 

each other and from Vermont, ought to be very thankful to the 
English Bishops for consecrating the Bishop elect of Vermont, as 
it would prevent them the trouble and expense of travelling above 
1200 miles to form a temporary College to consecrate the Bishop 
elect of Vermont. Furthermore, My Lord, there is no existing 
law in the United States of America, either in Church or State, 
that can oblige the aforesaid three Bishops to meet to consecrate 
a Bishop for Vermont. 

His Grace replied that those inconveniences were not to be 
imputed to him, or to the English Bishops. 

The undersigned Agent suspected that his Grace had some 
latent reasons, which kept him from consecrating the Bishop elect. 
He therefore requested his Grace to inform him, if his Grace had 
anything to object to the character of Dr. Peters, the Bishop 
elect of Vermont, that caused him to be unwilling to consecrate 
him. 

His Grace readily answered, no, by no means. His character 
is unexceptionable. His Grace then asked the undersigned Agent, 
why application was made to him to consecrate a fourth Bishop 
for the American States, since he (his Grace) had committed 
himself in the House of Lords, by an explanation of the design 
of the Act ? 

The undersigned Agent answered, he made application to his 
Grace, because his Grace was Metropolitan of all England, and 
before this hour he never heard of said explanation. 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Agent 

For the Church of Vermont." 
Rural Magazine, vol. ii, pp. 74, 75, 76. 

" No. 340, Strand, May 11th, 1795. 
My Lord : 

. I had the honor of addressing your Grace on the 28th day of 
April, praying for such an answer as might justify me as Agent 
before the Convention of the Episcopal Church of Vermont, and 
the Governor thereof, respecting the Consecration of their Bishop 
elect — a favor solicited on the principles of religion, order and 
policy, as it relates to the divine right of Episcopacy, and the 
prosperity of the Church of England in Vermont, admissible by 



FA CTS AJVD D OCUMEJ{TS-1794. 37 

the Act of rarliament of 1786, and resting entirely on your Grace's 
discretion and benevolence. The necessities of the Church in 
Vermont and my family concerns 'require my speedy return to 
America. I, therefore, hope your Grace will soon find leisure to 
give me such an answer, as will naturally tend to keep up the 
present harmony of the Church in Vermont, and prevent that dis- 
cord inevitable and ruinous to canonical Episcopacy in that State, 
should the Convention be defeated in their present application to 
your Grace, and the cause thereof be made public. 

I see myself to be in an unpleasant situation on my return, un- 
less I should be able to assign satisfactory reasons for not succeed- 
ing in my embassy from the Convention to your Grace. The 
Convention of Vermont want not to be told that the English 
Bishops are not obliged to consecrate their Bishop elect, or that 
the three Bishops of the three States in America may or may not 
meet to consecrate him. 

It will be sufficient, as I believe, to convince the majority of the 
Convention, that the Divine right of Protestant Episcopacy is not 
deemed necessary in the Church of Vermont, when they shall be 
told that the English Bishops have refused to consecrate their 
Bishop elect, under an Act of Parliament, made for that pious and 
benevolent purpose. I augur the consequences will be that the 
Deistical and Philosophic part of Americans will publish compari- 
sons between the conduct of the English Bishops and those of the 
Greek and Latin Churches, as well as those of the Coetus of Hol- 
land, the Kirk of Scotland, and the Superintendents of the Lu- 
therans in Germany, who annually send laborers into the vineyard 
of America to promote what they deem to be the glory of the 
Church of Christ. 

My Lord, did I not believe in the Divine right of Episcopacy 
as well as in Christianity, I should not have become an Agent of 
a very respectable Convention of a respectable State ; but would 
have advised the Convention to have elected some person to be 
their Bishop, and then have petitioned their Sovereign Magistrate 
to consecrate him as Moses did Aaron. 

Should your Grace refuse to consecrate the present Bishop elect 
of Vermont, he has resolved not to go out with me. Consequent- 
ly, on my return, the Convention most likely will elect another 



38 FACTS AMD DOCUMEJ^TS-1794. 

person, who will be content with a consecration performed by the 
Governor, and not trouble themselves with the three Bishops 
widely spread in America, or elsewhere, and, at the same time, 
publish to the world their reasons for so doing. With a view to 
prevent Schism and such evils, I came to England. 

I have the honor to be, My Lord, your Grace's most obedient 
and most humble servant, 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, 

Agent of the Episcopal Convention of Vermont. 
His Grace, the Lord Arch-Bishop of Canterbury." 

*' Canterbury, June 17, 1795. 

Sir, Having frequently stated to you in the fullest and most 
explicit manner, and once particularly in the presence of the Rev. 
S. Peters, the grounds and reasons which induced me to decline 
taking any steps to obtain his Majesty's licence for the consecra- 
tion of a Bishop for the Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont, 
I hoped there would be no call upon me to repeat them, but that 
your representations of those statements would be all-sufficient to 
exculpate you to the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of 
Vermont, who have elected that Gentleman their Bishop, and to 
his Excellency, Governor Chittenden, who united with their Con- 
vention in recommending him for consecration in England. 

I cannot, however, refuse your request to me, to state in writing 
the grounds on which my conduct in this business is founded. 

I beg leave to observe, then, that the statement which I made 
to you, was founded on a perfect recollection that the spirit and 
intention of the Act of Parliament which enabled the English 
Arch-Bishops and Bishops to consecrate Bishops for America, with 
the King's licence, extends only to such a number, as might, on 
their return to that country, consecrate a sufficient supply to keep 
up a succession in their Protestant Episcopal Church there. His 
Majesty clearly understood this to be the sole object of the Bill 
presented to Parliament. The Arch-Bishops and Bishops under- 
stood it precisely in the same way ; and that such was the inten- 
tion and purport of it, and no more, I myself stated in the House 
of Lords, when I was called on by the Earl of Effingham and oth- 



FA CIS AMD D OCUMEKTS-1794. 39 

ers to explain " what occasion there was for such a Bill, and to 
what number of Bishops our consecration was meant to extend." 

I must add further that on the 4th of July, 1786, I wrote from 
Canterbury to the Committee of the General Convention of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in America, sending a Copy of the 
Act, and stating that we understood it as above explained. You 
will find my letter in the printed Journal, which I sent you before 
I left London, of a Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 
holden at Wilmington, October 10th and 11th, 1786. To the same 
Journal I must refer you for another letter sent by me and the 
Arch-Bishop of York, to the Convention, stating the solemn testi- 
monies we should require respecting the literary, moral and relig- 
ious characters of the persons sent to us for consecration. You 
will allow me to recommend to your particular attention the very 
solemn forms of testimonials, which accompanied our letter, and 
which we insisted upon as essential to us in point of conscience, 
before we could proceed to consecrate any person sent to us for 
consecration, from that distant country. 

So much for the general question respecting the number of 
Bishops intended by the Act to be consecrated here for the States 
of America, on which the Arch-Bishops and Bishops entirely con- 
cur in opinion. But were the case otherwise — were they all of 
opinion that any greater number might be consecrated by that 
Act, Mr. Peters could not receive consecration from us, since we 
could have no such testimony, relative to him from Vermont 
(where for the last 20 years he has never resided), as we always 
have insisted upon, previous to that solemn act on our part. Nor 
could the want of that testimony be supplied in England, where 
he has lived all that time, without the exercise of any ecclesias- 
tical function, within the cognizance or jurisdiction of any of our 
Bishops. 

J. CANTUAR. 

CoL. J. Graham." 

Rural Magazine, vol. ii, pp. 117, 118, 119. 

The following letters of Dr. Peters, alluded to in the preceding 
pages, have never been published. They were kindly given by 
Madam Squier, of whom mention has been made. The first is 



40 FA CTS AMB D OCUME^TS-1794. 

short, and about one half of it has been so eaten by mice that it 
cannot be read. The date and signature remain legible. 

"London, Feb. 11th, 1796. 
My Dear Sir : 

I have inclosed a few lines in reply to your favours, as gen- 
eral hints. I must add that Gen'l Allen is here in good spirits 
and appears to be much the gentleman. I beg you will make an 
apology to Col. Lyon, Gen'l Cogswell, Mr. Nichols and Gov'r 
Chittenden for my not giving them answers to their kind and 
polite letters at the time. As to the Answer of the three Georgite 
Bishops to your Request, whether they will consecrate your 
Bishop elect ? — when and where ? — I am not much interested, nor 
is the Church of God ; as they are limited to the States of New 
York, Pennsylvania and Virginia, where the yellow fever has 
taken up its residence, by the Act of Parliament on which their 
Consecration depended, and by their own Subscriptions at Lam- 
beth, and by their Royal Warrant. ***** 

* ** ******* 

I am, dear Sir, 

Your most obedient and most humble servant, 

SAMUEL PETERS. 
Truman Squier, Esq'r 
Manchester, Verdmont." 

"London, Feb. 11th, 1796. 
Truman Squier, Esq., — 

My Dear Sir : 
The 8th of January '96, Col, Graham delivered your Favours 
of November 14th and 18th, '95, which greatly flattered my van- 
ity and future prospects in Verdmont ; though a Letter, said to 
have come from a Dissenting Minister of that State, has been 
published here purporting, "that there are no Episcopal Churches 
in the State, but a few Church People, and only two or three 
strolling Ministers, who cannot get a decent support, and yet 
these People have elected a Bishop, who must support himself or 
starve with his Priests, if he should find one on his arrival." 
This account has caused much conversation here ; and since the 
State have sequestered those Lands, formerly under the Guard- 



, FACTS AJfD DOCUMEJfTS-1794- 41 

ianship of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to other 
purposes than that of supporting Episcopacy in that State ; where 
report says, the Deists and various kinds of Dissenters compose 
eight tenths of its inhabitants, its wealth, and power. Many 
people here believe me to be mad, if I should further think of 
trying to build up a prelatic Church in the howling wilderness. 

I find myself disappointed by the Decree of your General As- 
sembly. No one here thought they would have done more than 
cut off the claim of Patronage held up by our Propagation Society. 

I have only to consider now, what mode is, or can be taken 
for the support of a Bishop in Verdmont, since they cannot, or 
do not support their Priests. Mr. Barber said in his Letter, "that 
the only difficulty with the Convention and Church of Verdmont, 
was how to support a Bishop;" and you say, ''I hope you will in 
no respect be disappointed and am fearful it will be out of our 
power to sufficiently to reward you for your good offices. However 
the Churches in Verdmont will, I am persuaded, be willing to 
reward you as far as their abilities will permit." " The Conven- 
tion and Church hope you will not doubt, their doing all in their 
Power for your honour and dignity agreeable to the fashion of 
this country, if you come among us." 

I never could entertain any doubt of the Convention who 
have acted so honorable towards me whilst I was absent and 
in a foreign country, as to invite me home after twenty years' 
banishment, for acting according to my Conscience and Oath; 
but who are the Churches in Verdmont ? 

Mr. Ogden and Mr. Barber have been expelled Verdmont by 
Starvation. Bishop Seabury has been deserted in point of sup- 
port, by the Churches in Connecticut and the three Georgite 
Bishops have no support, but from their respective Congregations, 
[and] complain of their miserable situation. 

I have lived 1.5 years in Connecticut without being a burthen 
to my hearers, when I was young and rich ; but now I am old 
and poor I cannot do the like in Verdmont. I cannot oversee 
your Churches and visit them, and take charge of a Parish at the 
same time, at my own expense, at the certain loss of my present 
stipend here, so soon as I am consecrated Bishop of Verdmont, 
whereby I become an Alien to Great Britain. 



42 FACTS AMD DOCUMEJfTS-1794- 

On my arrival in your State I have neither house, land or 
stipend to subsist me in America, and when I am there I expect 
to do the duties of a faithful Bishop : but to do it, I must, so far 
as yet appears, depend on the Convention, or individuals for sup- 
port. This would be hard on them, and too grating to my mind 
to bear. If therefore no fixed provision can be made for me by 
the whole people, whom I am to serve with fidelity and gratitude, 
I shall never think of making myself a burden on the bounty and 
generosity of Convention and a few individuals, because I mean 
to labour for the public. I expect to live according to your 
fashion, and not according to the extravagant fashion of Euro- 
pean Bishops, who bind not up him that is lame, look not after 
him that is lost, nor correct those who have wandered, yet eat 
of their milk and are covered with their wool. 

Human life is short, and precarious, but not more so than 
human tempers and abilities. A continual dropping of water will 
perforate the adamant and rust in a few years, months, or days 
will eat up iron. The ablest willing benefactors of me and the 
Church may soon be removed to other States, or to Heaven, and 
leave me to the protection of the overseers of the poor. Here I 
can burn down the caudle of life into the socket, till the Extin- 
guisher caps the blaze with the primitive shade that existed 
before " Deus dixit esto Lux, et fuit lux," without burthening 
individuals, or doing much good to the House of God and the 
offices thereof, or to myself, except that of ascending Jacob's 
Ladder. Christ had not where to lay His weary head. This is 
my case. John the Baptist was in a wilderness, but had a 
leathern girdle about his loins and his food was locusts and wild 
honey. So much I possess not when in Verdmont. 

I have long since overcome the world, and been laughing at 
its vanity; yet I am clothed with human nature. I seek but 
little here below, nor want it long. 

My honour, dignity and delight all rest on building up your 
Prelatical Church, not on promoting an Hierarchy, or College of 
Bishops, Arch-Bishops, Patriarchs, Cardinals, Popes, and Kings — 
a conclave of knaves — the invention of men — the parents of 
Feudalism and Aristocracy, which drove Christianity out of Asia 
and Africa, and our Fathers from Europe to America. 



FA CTS AXB D OCUMEKTS-T794. 43 

My dear Sir, think on these things, and let me know your 
thoughts; and then if I have a Certainty of not disgracing you 
and your Church hy my poverty, I will go over and bless you 
and all denominations with that Peace of God which shall unite 
them in love and joy. 

As to my Consecration I have no anxiety about it. 8t. Paul 
alone consecrated Titus. One Bishop is sufficient to consecrate 
me. Moses alone consecrated Aaron High Priest. The Kings 
of Denmark and Sweden consecrated their Bishops; and, as Gov. 
Chittenden is Chief Magistrate by voice of the People to whom 
God gave His power to elect Saul and David, etc. etc. — no doubt 
but his Excellency can make High Priests and Bishops, as well 
as Saul, David and tlu^ Kings of Sweden and Denmark and 
England, over Verdmont. — Adieu. 

SAMUEL PETERS." 

"London, July 20th, 1796. 
My Dkar Sir, 

On February 11th, 1796, I replied to your favor of 14th of 
November, 1795, delivered to me by Col. Graham on January 8, 
1796. Since which time I have been waiting to hear from you, 
respecting the Determination of those men whom you style, "The 
American Bishops," but I have waited in vain. Nevertheless, I 
have received a Letter from the Rev. Mr. Chittenden, dated Jan. 
20th, 1796, stating his Reasons why he opposed my election, and 
why my residence in Verdmont will be prejudicial to the Church 
and myself. The first reason stated is — Dr. Bass was duly elected 
by your Annual Convention, and had not refused the terms offered 
him before a Special Convention met at Manchester in February, 
1794, composed only of nine Parishes out of twenty-four ; and a 
majority of this junto elected Dr. Peters. 2dly, Dr. Peters acted 
a part during the American War not approved by the dissenting 
Churches, nor by fifteen Parishes out of twenty-four of the 
Episcopalians. Of course, such a character would tend to harm, 
not to build up the Church. 3dly, that Dr. Bass was to reside at 
Newburyport four or five years and serve the Church of Verd- 
mont free of expense, till the Church Lands should be improved 
so as to compensate him for his labours of love during his resi- 
dence in Verdmont. 



44 FA CIS AJfD D CUMEJ^TS—1794. 

I have replied to the Rev. Mr. Chittenden, and beg leave to 
refer yon to it, of even date with this. 

I find by a printed journal of a Convention at Philadelphia last 
September, that the application of the Convention of Verdmont 
was taken into consideration, and the answer of those men you 
style, "the American Bishops," was, "that the Bishops of the 
Philadelphia Convention cannot with propriety consecrate a Bish- 
op for any State until said State shall have acceded to the Juris- 
diction. Doctrine, and Discipline of the Church of the United States^ 

Whatever may be meant by the Church of the United States, 
I find Congress have no power to establish any Church, and that 
each State has not established any Church. If then there be a 
Church of the United States, it must owe its establishment to the 
Pope, or to the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, or to the Kirk of 
Scotland, or to those men you style "the American Bishops." 
How they came to be "the American Bishops," I have to learn: 
because our Arch-Bishop located Dr. Provoost, Dr. White, and 
Dr. Madison, to be Bishops -in their respective States, viz.. New 
York, Pennsylvania and Virginia, and such are their Letters of 
Orders. By what authority, then, have these three located 
Bishops of three States called their Churches, "the Church of 
the United States," and themselves a College of Bishops, with 
Cognizance, and Jurisdiction over the Church in each State ? 

This claim is a usurpation by their own confession and is 
nugatory as a voice crying in the wilderness. Because the 
Church of Verdmont has not acceded to their religious System 
and Hierarchy- Jurisdiction, they ( the Bishops) cannot with con- 
sistency consecrate a Bishop for Verdmont, whose Church has 
not put herself under their Hierarchal Power, or Collegiate 
Jurisdiction. 

How, then, are they "the American Bishops," but in the same 
sense as are the Pope, the Bishops of England, France and Spain ? 

When the Chift-ch of Verdmont puts herself under the Juris- 
diction of the Convention of Philadelphia she will cease to be the 
Episcopal Church of Verdmont and become a fifteenth part of the 
American invisible Church, subjugated to the American three visible 
Bishops, who have subjected themselves as a College of Bishops in 
America to the Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, in order to establish 



FACTS AXD DOCUMEJ^TS-1794. 45 

an Aristocracy in your States, and an Hierarchy in your Church, 
and to fulfil the Dream of Nebuchadnezzar, whose Image had 
feet part of iron and part of clay and were broken in pieces by a 
Btone cut out of a mountain without hands of men. — Daniel 2d. 
On the same principle the Pope in G02, and Mahomet in G20, 
erected their Hierarchies, which placed Bishops, Priests and 
Deacons under nine superior orders, not known to Melchizedek, 
to Aaron, nor to Christ or His Apostles and Successors. Will 
Congress ever establish a Church and connect it with the Civil 
Government ? If that should happen in my native country, the 
Stone will separate the iron from the clay, as it has done in 
France, Italy and Germany, whose wind now shakes the Hie- 
rarchy and Aristocracy of all Europe, and promises to us the 
Primitive Episcopacy established by Jesus, the Princeps Pastorum 
and Bishop of our souls. 

These observations I have offered to wai'n you and the Church 
in Verdmont to stand fast in the liberty wherewith Christ has 
made you free under a Prelacy, of a Bishop, Priests, and Deacons, 
according to the orders of Melchizedek, viz. the Protassamen, the 
Archflamines and the Flamines, and the Jewish Priesthood, of 
High Priest, the Priests and Levites, in honour and commemora- 
tion of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, who are one in 
love, design and labour. 

The Apostles were equal in spiritual power. As such they 
separated from Jerusalem after receiving the Holy Ghost, and 
ordained Bishops, Priests and Deacons, in their single and sepa- 
rate capacity, without ever meeting again to form a College of 
Bishops. 

Whence, then, arose the idea of a College of Bishops as neces- 
sary to the Consecration of a Bishop ? Answer : From the Pope 
and Conclave of Rome, from Mahomet and from Monarchs, or 
Despots, with the ignoble purpose of ti-ampling under foot the 
Institution of Christ, ordained in His Church. 

Christ was High Priest. So was each of His Apostles and 
their Successors. What Christian, therefore, must he be who 
seeks to establish a College of Bishops above the Chief Shepherd 
and Bishop of His own Flock ! This was the work of Antichrist, 
of Deists and Arians, who brought spiritual wickedness into high 
places — making them Lords. 



46 FA CTS AJh^D D OCUMEJfTS-1794. 

Will America give ubiquity only to a College of Bishops ? 
Remember the Fasces of Rome only represented what the Tyrants 
of Rome aimed at and effected. Your Church will be free under 
a Bishop, Priests and Deacons ; but they and your Church will be 
slaves under a College of Bishops, as all Bishops and Churches 
were under the Pope, Cardinals, Patriarchs, Arch-Bishops and a 
Legion of Bashaws and Ubiquitarians. 

Each Church in each State is free and sovereign. The civil 
powers cannot rob you of your freedom. You must rob your- 
selves by coming into the wake of the College of Bishops at 
Philadelphia, or at Rome. Remember it is better to prevent an 
evil than to cure it. I was free born and choose freedom in my 
native country to slavery in Europe. 

I shall see you, but not now. Farewell. 

SAMUEL PETERS. 

Trumax Squier, Esq." 

There is no Record of the regular annual Convention of the 
Diocese in September 179-1. It appears from the records of the 
Parish iu Bethel that delegates were appointed by it to attend the 
Convention at Castleton. The Records of the Parishes in Ar- 
lington and Manchester contain nothing respecting it. It is quite 
probable, inasmuch as there had been a Special Convention in 
February, that no Convention was holdeu at the usual time. The 
days were evil. Cupidity, sectarianism and injustice were in the 
ascendant. The few scattered members of the Episcopal Church 
may naturally have been discouraged. It was almost everywhere 
spoken against, for the simple reasons that its doctrines were mis- 
understood, and that it was feeble as respected numbers and had 
a rightful claim to a large endowment, which others, professing all 
sorts of religion, or no religion in particular, very much coveted. 

During the Session of the Legislature at Rutland in the Fall of 
1794, after an ineffectual attempt to sequester the lands of the 
Propagation Society to the use of the University of Vermont, 
measures were taken to divert both the Society and Glebe lands 
from their intended and known use. TheVesult of these measures 
was the passage of two Bills which confiscated the whole property 
of the Episcopal Church, awarding from the income of the Glebes, 
a miserable pro rata pittance to her Clergy. 



FACTS J.J^D D0CUME:N'TS-1794. 47 

It is deemed proper for the information of such as may desire 
to understand the relation of the Episcopal Church in Vermont 
to the State, and what in other days has heen done by the Legis- 
lature to impoverish and destroy it, to insert here so much of the 
Journal of the Session of 1794, as has respect to the Society and 
Glebe reservations in the New-Hampshire Grants. Nothing is 
changed, with the exception in the case of Committees and the 
vote of members by yea and nay, where the surname only is put 
in the Journal, the Christian name, taken from the printed List 
of members, has been prefixed, and the name of the Town or 
County represented, also taken from the authorized List of names 
and places, has been added : 

Tuesday, October 14th, 1794. " A Petition signed by Ira Al- 
len and Enoch Woodbridge, Esquires, in behalf of the Corpora- 
tion of the University of Vermont, stating, that in most of the 
towns in this State, granted by the government of New Hamp- 
shire, there is one right in each town, granted for the Propagation 
of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, etc., that the property of those 
rights has merged in the Legislature of this State; and as those 
were by the Grantor intended for public and pious uses, and have 
not been appropriated ; and that they be made useful in extend- 
ing the knowledge of the Scriptures, the Arts and Sciences, to 
this and the rising generations, pray that they may have liberty 
to bring in a Bill, appropriating all those rights to the University 
of Vermont, was read and the prayer thereof was granted. Ac- 
cordingly, A Bill, entitled. An Act granting the lands therein 
described, to the University of Vermont, was read. Ordered, 
That it lie on the table for consideration." — Journal of 1794, p. 30. 
Three days later, Friday, October 17th, we find Mr. Ira Allen, 
instead of calling attention to the Bill in favor of the University 
of Vermont, pursuing a somewhat different course, but still bent 
on confiscating the property of the Episcopal Church. The tem- 
per of the Legislature may not have been favorable to the Uni- 
versity, or doubts may have arisen in his mind respecting the 
probable great extension of "the knowledge of the Scriptures" by 
the enrichment of that institution. 

"On motion by Mr. I. Allen, Resolved, That His Excellency, 
the Governor and Council be requested to join the House in 



48 FA CTS AMD B CUME.YTS-1794. 

Grand-Committe to-morrow morning, to take into consideration, 
the propriety of disposing of the land in the several towns of this 
State, reserved for the Propagation of the Gospel in foreign 
parts." — Journal, 1794, p. 70. 

Saturday, 18th October, "agreeable to the order of the day, 
His Excellency the Governor and Council, and the House of Rep- 
resentatives, joined in Grand Committee, to take into considera- 
tion the propriety of disposing of the rights of land in the several 
towns in this State, reserved for the propagation of the Gospel in 
foreign parts. His Excellency in the Chair, Ros. Hopkins, Clerk. 
After the Charter of the township of Rutland, issued by Benning 
Wentworth, Esquire, late Governor of the Province of New 
Hampshire, to the proprietors thereof; and, also, the Treaty of 
Peace, concluded between the United States and Great Britain, 
in 1783, were read, a desultory conversation ensued, when the 
Committee adjourned until the opening of the House on Tuesday 
Morning next." — Journal, 1794, pp. 73, 74. 

"Tuesday, 21st October, the Grand Committee met pursuant 
to adjournment. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Com- 
mittee, that the lands in this State, granted by the late Governor 
of New Hampshire to the Society for the Propagation of the Gos- 
pel in Foreign Parts, does of right belong to this State." 

"On motion of Mr. I. Allen, Resolved, That a Committee of 
one Member from each County, be appointed to report their opin- 
ion to this Committee, what use shall be made of the rights of 
land, granted for the propagation of the Gospel in foreign parts. 
Members chosen: Messieurs Jonas Galusha, Luke Knowlton, Sam- 
uel Williams, Stephen Jacob, John Strong, William Chamberlin 
and John White. The Committee then adjourned until the open- 
ing of the House, on Thursday Morning next." Journal ] 794, 
p. 94. 

Tuesday, October 21st, afternoon session. "The Committee 
appointed on the tenth article in the arrangement of the business 
of the present Session, viz. That some effectual measures be taken 
to direct the Selectmen to take actual possession of the Glebe and 
propagation rights in the several towns in this State, made the 
following report : That it is the opinion of your Committee that 
the Legislature of this State have the sole right to dispose of the 



FA CIS AMD D OCVMEKTS-1794. 49 

right in each town, known and called by the name of the propa- 
gation right, and that they be disposed of for the use and benefit 
of common schools, in the several towns in which they lie. 

Your Committee further report the following Bill for the better 
improvement of the Glebe-Lands, viz. A Bill, entitled, An Act au- 
thorizing the Select-men of the several tow^ns, in this State, to 
take possession of the Glebe-Lands. 

(Signed ) JONAS GALUSHA, for tlie Committee. 

Which report was read and accepted, so far as it relates to the 
Glebe-Lands. The Bill contained in the above report was then 
read. 

On motion, Ordered, That it be referred to a Committee con- 
sisting of one Member from each county, to revise and amend. 
Members chosen : Messrs Andrew Selden, Stamford ; John Bridge- 
man, Hinsdale; Joseph Randall, Wallingford; Elijah Robbinson, 
Weathersfield ; Stephen Hard, Salisbury ; William Chamberlin, 
Peacham and William C. Harrington, Shelburne." Journal, 1794, 
pp. 99, 100. 

Thursday, October 23d. " The Grand-Committee met pursuant 
to adjournment. The sub-committee made the following report, 
viz. 

To the Grand-Committee, — 

Your Committee report as their opinion that the rights of 
land in this State, granted to the Society for the Propagation of 
the Gospel in Foreign Parts ought to be appropriated for the ben- 
efit of schools, in the respective towns, where the lands lie. 

(Signed ) JOHN STRONG, for Committee." 
Journal, 1794, p. 110. 

Friday, Oct. 24th. ''On motion. Ordered, That a Committee 
of three be appointed to prepare and bring in a Bill, agreeable to 
the report of the Sub-Committee of the Grand Committee, viz. 
That the rights of land in this State, granted to the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, ought to be ap- 
propriated for the benefit of schools in the respective towns, in 
which they lie. Members chosen : Messrs Timothy Todd, Arling- 
ton ; Stephen Jacob, Windsor, and Jonathan Robbinson, Ben- 
nington. 



50 FA CIS AKD D CUMEKTS-1794. 

On motion, Resolved, That the Legislature is possessed of the 
right to direct to such uses as may, in their opinion, be most sub- 
servient to the support of religious worship, the several rights of 
land in this State, granted by the late British government, for a 
Glebe for the Church of England as by their law established. 

On motion, Ordered, That the Committee last appointed, be a 
Committee to bring in a Bill agreeably to the tenor of the fore- 
going resolve," Journal 1794, pp. 130, 131. 

Tuesday, Oct. 28th. " The Committee appointed to bring in 
a Bill, directing the uses of the Glebe-Rights within this State, 
reported, A Bill, entitled, An Act directing the uses of the rights 
of land in this State, heretofore granted by the British Govern- 
ment, as Glebes, for the benefit of the Church of England, as by 
their law established, Avhich was read and accepted. The said 
Bill, having had a first reading, Ordered, That it lie on the table." 

" The Committee appointed to prepare and bring in a Bill on 
the report of the Sub-Committee of the Grand-Committee, rela- 
tive to the appropriation of the rights of land granted to the So- 
ciety for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, reported 
a Bill, entitled, An Act, directing the appropriation of the lands in 
this State heretofore granted by the British Government, to the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, which 
report was read and accepted. The said Bill having had a first 
reading, Ordered, That it lie on the table." Journal, 1794, pp. 
174, 175. 

Wednesday, Oct. 29th. " A Bill, entitled An Act, directing 
the uses of the rights of land in this State, heretofore granted by 
the British Government, as Glebes, for the benefit of the Church 
of England, as by their law established was read the second time. 
On the question : Will the House accept said Bill ? The yeas and 
nays being required by Mr. Gallup, those who voted in the affirm- 
ative were, Lemuel Bradley, Sunderland; Simeon Hazeltine, Sand- 
gate ; Stephen Martindale, Dorset; Jonathan Robbinson, Ben- 
nington; Moses Sheldon, Rupert; Andrew Selden, Stamford; 
Samuel Thayer, Reedsboro ; Peter Wright, Shaftsbury ; Josiah 
Wright, Pownal; Ebenezer Allen, New-Fane; Josiah Arms, 
Brattleboro ; Edward Aiken, Londonderry; William Bigelow, 



FACTS AJfD DOCUMEXTS-1794. 51 

Guilford ; John Bridgeraan, Hinsdale ; Timothy Castle, Willming- 
ton ; John Campbell, Putney; Caleb Hay ward, Jamaca ; David 
Palmer, Grafton; James Shafter, Athens; Eliakim Spooner, 
Westminster ; David Sanderson, Rockingham ; Daniel Taylor, 
Dummerston , Jonas Whiting, Marlboro ; Asa Wheelock, Wards- 
boro ; Jonathan Brewster. Middleton ; Joseph Button, Wells ; 
John Blanchard, Sudbury ; John Bancroft, Chittenden ; Emanuel 
Case, Shrewsbury ; Abel Cooper, Clarenden ; Joseph Haskell, 
Pawlet; Abraham Jackson, Mount Holly; Nathan Ramsey, Hub- 
bardton, Joseph Randall, Wallingford; George Sherman, Ira; 
Amos Spafford, Orwell; Orange Train, Tinmouth ; Samuel Wil- 
liams, Rutland; John Clark, Hartford; Benjamin Emmons, Wood- 
stock; Stephen Jacob, Windsor; Elias Keyes, Sturbridge ; Wil- 
liam Perry, Pomfret; Benjamin Perkins, Bridgewater; Frederick 
Rogers, Andover ; Waitstill Ranney, Chester ; Simeon Stevens, 
Springfield ; Reuben Spalding, Sharon ; James Smith, Cavendish ; 

Abijah Stone, Reading; Bradley, New Haven; Clark, 

Addison; Joshua Hyde, Middlebury; Samuel Jewet, Waybridge; 
Henry McLaughlin, Bristol; James Moore, Shoreham; James 
Smith, Leicester; Joseph Willoughby, Monkton ; E. Allen, South 
Hero ; Ira Allen, Coulchester ; Jonathan Butterfield, Highgate ; 
Ezra Butler, Waterbury; Lemuel Bostwick, Hinesburgh; Martin 
Chittenden, Jericho ; William Coit, Burlington; Jonathan Dan- 
forth, Fairfax; Benjamin Davis, Duxbury; James Gilmore, Cam- 
bridge; Silas Hathaway, St. Albans; Nathan Hutchins, North 
Hero; William C. Harrington, Shelburne; David Hubbell, Char- 
lotte ; Benjamin Marvin, Alburgh ; Amos Mansfield, Milton ; John 
McConnel, Johnston; Luther Mosely, Moreton; Seth Putnam, 
Middlesex; Jeremiah Stone, Westford; Joseph Scot, Craftsbury; 
Edmund Town, Fairfield; William Utley, Isle-Mott; Joshua 
Bayley, Newbury; John Barron, Bradford; Daniel Cahoon, Lyn- 
don ; Asher Chamberlin, Thetford ; William Chamberlin, Peach- 
am; Josiah Edson, Randolph; Experians Fisk, Brookfield ; 
Amasa Grout, Lunenburgh ; Heber Gilbert, Strafford ; Samuel 
Hazletine, Corinth ; Alexander Harvey, Barnet ; Nathaniel Kings- 
bury, Tnnbridge; James More, Cabot; Isaac Nichols, Braintrce ; 
Thomas Porter, Vershire ; Josiah Page, Ryegate ; Asaph Sher- 
man, Barre ; Benjamin Sias, Danville ; John Taplin, Berlin. 



52 FACTS AND DOCUMEJ^TS-1794, 

Those who voted in the negative, were, Martin Powel, Man- 
chester; James Roberts, Whitingham ; Isaac Horsford, Poultney; 
Elihu Sherman, Danby ; Enoch Emmerson, Rochester ; Oliver 
Gallup, Hartland ; Joel Marsh, Bethel ; Elias Stevens, Royalton ; 
Joel Foster, Whiting ; Stephen Hard, Salisbury ; Marshal Smith, 
Bridport ; Jabez Jones, Bolton ; Seth Putnam, Middlesex ; Samuel 
Badger, Chelsea; Haines French, Maidston. 

It passed in the ailfirmative. Yeas, 100, Nays, 15. 

Ordered, That it be engrossed, and sent to the Governor and 
Council for revision and concurrence, or proposals of amendment. 

A Bill, entitled An Act, directing the appropriation of the lands 
in this State heretofore granted by the British Government to the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, was 
read the second time and accepted. 

Ordered, That it be sent to the Governor and Council for 
revision and concurrence, or proposals of amendment." — Journal, 
1794, pp. 191, 192. 

These Bills were returned from the Governor and Council, Oc- 
tober 30th, 1794, and became laws. The following is a copy of 
them, as subsequently published : 

"An Act directing the uses of the rights of land, in this State, 
heretofore granted by the British Government as Glebes, for the 
benefit of the Church of England, as by their law established : 

Whereas, by the first principles of our government, it is con- 
templated, that all religious sects and denominations of Christians, 
whose religious tenets are consistent with allegiance to the con- 
stitution and government of this State, should receive equal pro- 
tection and patronage, from the civil power. And whereas it is 
contemplated, in the grants heretofore made by the British Gov- 
ernment, commonly called Glebe-Rights, that the uses of said 
rights should be, to the sole and exclusive purpose of building up 
a national religion, of a government diverse from, and inconsistent 
with the rights of our own : by reason whereof, and on the prin- 
ciples of the revolution, the property of said lands is vested in this 
State : therefore, It is hereby enacted ly the General Assembly of the 
State of Vermont, That the rights of land, in the several towns of 
this State, heretofore granted under the authority of the British 



FA CIS AKD D OCUMEMTS-1794. 53 

Government, m Glehes, for the use of the Church of England, as 
by law established, be, and they hereby are granted, to the several 
and respective towns, in which such lands lie, to the use, and for 
the sole purpose, of appropriating the rents and profits of such 
lands, to and for the support of religious worship, in such towns 
forever. The said rents and profits to be distributed, in towns 
where there may be more than one resident religious teacher, for 
the support of such teachers, in proportion to the number of rata- 
ble polls belonging to the respective congregations, and residents, 
in such towns. And that it shall be the duty of the selectmen, of 
the respective towns where such lands lie, in the name and behalf 
of such towns, by action of ejectment, on the demise of the select- 
men of such towns, respectively, to obtain possession of, and lease 
out such lands, for a term not exceeding fourteen years, at any 
one time. And they shall have power to demand, recover, and 
receive the rents and profits arising from such lands; and shall, 
from time to time, pay the same into the treasury of such town. 
Which sums, so collected and paid as aforesaid, after satisfying 
such reasonable demands as said selectmen may justly have, for 
their trouble and expense in said business, adjusted and voted by 
such town, shall be paid out, by order of the selectmen, for the 
purposes, and in the proportions, herein before expressed." Laws 
of Vermont, compiled by William Slade, Jun., pp. 194, 195. 

"An Act, directing the appropriation of the Lands in this State, 
heretofore granted by the British Government, to 'the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts.' 

Whereas, by the customs and usages of nations, no aliens can 
or of right ought to hold real estate, in a country to whose juris- 
diction they cannot be made amenable or responsible. And 
whereas 'the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts,' is a corporation created by, and existing within a foreign 
jurisdiction, to which they alone are amenable ; by reason whereof, 
at the time of the late revolution of this and the United States, 
from the jurisdiction of Great Britain, all lands in this State, 
granted to * the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 
Foreign Parts,' became vested in this State ; and has to this time, 
remained unappropriated. And whereas it appears to this Legis- 



54 FACTS ANB BOCUMEKTS-T794. 

latiire, that said lands might be more useful, if granted for the 
purposes of education, than in any other way : therefore, It it 
hereby enacted hy the General Assembly of the State of Vermont, That 
the several rights of land, in this State, granted under the author- 
ity of the British Government, previous to the Revolution, to 'the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts,' be, 
and the same hereby are granted, severally, to the respective 
towns, in which such lands lie, and to their respective use and 
uses forever, in manner following, viz. it shall be the duty of the 
selectmen, in the respective towns, in the name and behalf of such 
towns, if necessary, to demand, sue for, and recover the possession 
of such lands, and the same to lease out, as long as water runs or 
wood grows; and, annually at farthest, to collect the rents and 
profits of such lands, and the same pay into the treasury of such 
town, taking the treasurer's receipt therefor. Which moneys so 
arising, after deducting the reasonable expense and charge of the 
said selectmen, as the town shall legally vote to allow, shall be 
drawn out of the treasury, in pursuance of a vote of such town, 
and distributed in the several school districts in such town, annu- 
ally, in proportion to the number of ratable polls in such district. 
Provided, such districts, shall in the course of the year immedi- 
ately preceding, have employed a school-master within such dis- 
trict, whose services as such, exclusive of boarding, shall have 
amounted to such dividend. But, such districts as shall not have 
employed a school-master, as aforesaid, shall not, for the year so 
neglecting, be entitled to any dividend. And if no district, in 
such town, shall have employed a school-master, as aforesaid ; 
then such rents shall, by the said selectmen, be drawn out of the 
treasury, and put to use, for one year, the aggregate whereof shall 
be added to the next annual dividend ; and so, from time to time, 
as the case may be." Laws of Vermont, compiled by William 
Slade, Juii., pp. 193, 194. 



JOVEKAL-1795. 55 

1795. 

Rutland, Nov. 13th, 1795. 
The Episcopal Church Convention of the State of Ver- 
mont met according to a s]pecial warning for that purpose. 
On motion resolved, that a Secretary be appointed to fill 

the vacancy. 

Col. Lyon nominated Truman Squier, Esq., which nom- 
ination being seconded, Voted that Trumaa Squier, Esq. be 
appointed Secretary, vice, the Rev. Daniel Barber, having 
moved out of this State, who accepted of his appointment. 

Present : 
Mr. Eleazer Baldwin, President, and the following Mem- 
bers of said Convention : 

FAIRHAVEN: 

Col. Matthew Lyox. 

PAWLET: 

Capt. Benoni Smith, Henry Worster. 

MANCHESTER : 
Job Giddings, Esq., Philo Sperry. 

Noah Smith, 

SANDGATE : 

Rev. James Nichols. 

CASTLETON: 

John Whitlock. 

RUTLAND: 

Col. John A. Graham, Cophan Smith, 
Burr Graham, Robert Graham. 

On motion. Voted that Jonathan Parker, jun., Esq. of 
Clarenden be requested to take a seat in the Convention.^ 

Col. John A. Graham having laid before the Convention 
all his writings and his doings as their Agent to Great Brit- 
ain to obtain the Consecration of the Rev. Doct. S. Peters 
as their Bishop elect over the Episcopal Churches of the 
State of Vermont, which being read, etc. 



56 JOURJfAL-1795. 

Resolved ; That the thanks of this Convention be given 
to Col. John A. Graham for his Generosity and Zeal in the 
cause of religion, and for his wise and judicious conduct, as 
the Agent of this Convention to Great Britain. 

Resolved ; That this Convention has the highest sense of 
gratitude to the Rev. Dr. S. Peters, for his attention to this 
Church, and feel a sensible regret in not being able to pro- 
cure his Consecration, by means of the construction given 
by the English Arch-Bishops, of the Act of the British Par- 
liament, which provides for the consecration to the office of 
Bishop, of persons being subjects or citizens of Countries out 
of his Britanic Majesty's Dominions. 

Resolved ; That Truman Squier be appointed one of the 
Standing Committee, vice. Rev. Daniel Barber, having moved 
out of the State ; likewise, Job Giddings, Esq., vice, Rev. 
Mr. Ogden. 

Resolved ; That the President and Secretary of this Con- 
vention be and are hereby directed to write to the several 
Bishops of the United States, acquainting them with the 
Election of Dr. Peters to be Bishop of Vermont, and to in- 
form them that the Convention of Vermont, understanding 
it to be Dr. Peters'wish to be consecrated in England, and 
taking it for granted that it would be much more convenient 
to have Dr. Peters receive his consecration there, than to 
trouble the three American Bishops to come together for 
the purpose, for which reasons the Convention empowered 
Col. John A. Graham to repair to London, and take meas- 
ures for the consecration of Dr. Peters ; in which mission, 
although we have been unsuccessful, we still wish to know, 
if he will be consecrated our Bishop, and request them to 
confer with each other on the subject, and inform us their 
result, whether they will consecrate Dr. Peters our Bishop, 
and when and where it will be convenient for them to attend 
to it. 

Resolved j That Dr. Peters be acquainted with these 
transactions. 



JOURJfAL-1795. 57 

Eesolved ; That the doings of this Convention, with Col. 
Graham's Report, be forthwith published. 
The end of the Rutland Session. 



In a Letter, printed in Sprague's Annals of the American 
Episcopal Pulpit, the Rt. Rev. the Bishop of Indiana states that 
the Rev. Dr. Peters did not apply to the American Bishops for 
Consecration, and then assigns several reasons why no such ap- 
plication was made. In regard to the matter of application, the 
Rt. Rev. writer was in error; and no such reasons as those con- 
tained in his letter appear in the Journal of the General Conven- 
tion of 1795. At this distance of time it is quite difficult to tell 
precisely what were the sentiments of that Body of venerable 
men any further than the Record of their action, which they have 
left, may plainly show. Sprague's Ann. Am. Ep. Pulpit, p. 196. 

Previous to the meeting of the Special Convention at Rutland, 
November 13th, 1795, some one had forwarded the papers respect- 
ing the election of the Rev. Dr. Peters, and asking for his Conse- 
cration as Bishop of Vermont, by the College of Bishops in this 
country, to Bishop White. President of the House of Bisliops. At 
the time of this Convention, the question respecting the Consecra- 
tion of Dr. Peters had been decided in the General Convention at 
Philadelphia ; but the knowledge of this fact cannot have reached 
the members of the Convention at the time of the Session in Rut- 
land. The Resolution of the Convention above given doubtless 
contemplated the pressing of that application to a favorable issue. 

On the third day of the Session of the General Convention, at 
Philadelphia, September 10th, 1795, in the House of Clerical and 
Lay Deputies, " A letter was received from the Right Rev. Dr. 
White of the House of Bishops, enclosing sundry testimonials, 
respecting the Rev. Dr. Samuel Peters, as Bishop elect of the 
Church in the State of Vermont, which were read, and ordered to 
lie on the table." September 18th, being the 9th day of the Ses- 
sion of the General Convention, the following Resolution passed 
the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies respecting these testimo- 
nials : " Resolved ; That the testimonials from the State of Ver- 
mont respecting the Consecration of the Rev. Dr. Samuel Peters, 



58 JOUBJ^AL-1795. 

sent by the House of Bishops, be returned to them, with a request, 
that they will answer it in whatever manner they shall think best." 

The Journal of the House of Bishops of the same date — Sep- 
tember 18, 1795, the 9th day of the Session — contains the follow- 
ing minute and decision in regard to the Bishop elect of Vermont : 
" The house received from the House of Clerical and Lay Depu- 
ties, papers respecting the election of Dr. Peters to be Bishop ia 
the State of Vermont." 

" The President of this House is desired to give such an answer 
as the nature of the case requires, and particularly to mention, in 
the said answer, that the Bishops cannot with propriety consecrate 
a Bishop for the Church in any State, until such Church shall 
have acceded to the general Ecclesiastical Constitution of the 
Church in the United States." 

Here it seems fit to add, in brief, what is known of the Rev. 
Samuel Peters, LL. D. 

Samuel Peters, a son of John Peters, a distant relative of Hugh 
Peters, was born in Hebron, Connecticut, November 20, 1735. He 
graduated at Yale College in 1757. Having devoted a due length 
of time to theological reading, he went to England, and was or- 
dained in London, Deacon and Priest, in 1759. In 1760, he re- 
turned to this country, and took charge of the Church in Hebron. 
During about 14 years, he continued in the peaceful and exem- 
plary discharge of his clerical duties in tliis parish. At the 
approach of the Revolution, on account of his high Tory views, 
he became very obnoxious to the people. Having suffered much 
opposition and great indignity and violence from two mobs, he 
fled from his native town to Boston. From this place in the 
month of September, 1774, he sailed to England. Soon after his 
arrival in that country, he received from the Government a pen- 
sion and a grant for his property which had been confiscated by 
the Americans. For reasons which are not now known, he did 
not receive there any appointment to the discharge of his proper 
duty as a Priest in the Church. During his residence in England, 
he received the Degree of Doctor of Laws from one of the Scotch 
Universities. 

In 1794, about twenty years after leaving this country, Dr. 



JOURJ^AL-1795. 59 

Peters was elected Bishop of Vermont. To the older Churchmen 
in this State, he had been favorably known. In 1768, he visited 
Vermont, and did duty as a Missionary for eight weeks During 
this time in which he visited most of the settlements, as he states 
in his life of Hugh Peters, he baptized the incredible number of 
nearly twelve hundred adults and children. In 1771, he was on 
Missionary duty in the western part of New Hampshire and or- 
ganized the church in Claremont and baptized a number of chil- 
dren. The reasons why Dr. Peters was not consecrated to the 
office of Bishop in this state, as far as they can now be ascertained, 
appear in the various documents inserted in this Journal, under 
the dates of 1794 and 1795. 

During the next eleven years after this election to the office of 
Bishop of Vermont, Dr. Peters continued to reside in England. 
On account of some disagreement between Mr. Pitt and himself, 
Dr. Peters was struck from the pension list in 1803 or 1804. 
Having obtained, in connection with Dr. Lettsom of London, from 
Capt. Jonathan Carver, a noted Indian traveller, the grant of a 
tract of land one hundred miles square, situated on the East side 
of the Mississippi River, at the Falls of St. Anthony, he returned 
to this country in 1805. Although sought for many years with 
much trouble and wearisomeness. Dr. Peters never obtained pos- 
session of this grant. For most of the time, after his return from 
England, his means of living were small and uncertain, derived 
from fictitious land sales and charity. He died in New York, 
April 19th, 1826, in the ninety-first year of his age. His body 
was removed to Hebron for burial among his kindred and former 
associates. Samuel Jarvis Peters, of New Orleans, a grandson, 
erected a handsome monument over his grave in 1841. 

The Hon. John S. Peters, M. D. LL. D., late Governor of Con- 
necticut, a nephew of the Rev. Dr. Peters, says in regard to him 
that " he had an unusually commanding personal appearance. He 
was full six feet high, remarkably erect, of a large and muscular 
body, but not fat; his eyes were blue, and his face strongly 
marked by the small-pox. In his private intercourse he was ani- 
mated, even loquacious ; and the great amount of anecdote which 
he had at command rendered him a most entertaining companion. 
He had an uncommonly active mind, and had acquired a large 



60 - JOURMAL-1796. 

store of varied information. He had an iron will as well as an 
iron frame ; and whatever he undertook he pursued with a spirit 
of indomitable perseverance. His ruling passion was ambition; 
but though he made some noise in the world, he probably never 
reached any high point of distinction to which he aspired. As a 
preacher, he held a highly respectable rank : his sermons were 
written with care, and delivered in a manly and impressive man- 
ner. He loved kings, admired the British Government, and re- 
vered the Hierarchy. In his domestic and private relations, he 
was everything that could be desired." Sprague's Ann. Am. Ep. 
Pulpit, pp. 191 — 195. Thompson's Vermont, Part II, p. 194. 
Churchman's Magazine, vol. ii, p. 177. 



1796. 

ArlincxTOn, Sept. 21, 1796. 
The Annual Convention of the Episcopal Church of the 
State of Vermont met according to appointment. 

Mr. Eleazer Baldwin was elected President, and Truman 
Squier, Secretary. 
The following Members were present, viz. 
ARLINGTON : 

Caleb Dayton, Zadoc Hard, 

Nathan Canfield, Esq. Tyrus Hurd. 

SANDGATE ; 

Abraham Bristol, Theophilus Hurd. 

MANCHESTER : 

Samuel French, Abel Allis, M. D. 

BENNINGTON : 

George McEleheron. 

BETHEL: 

Philander Chase. 

On motion, Messrs. Luther Stone, Peleg Stone, and An- 
drew Hawley were invited to take seats in the Convention. 



JOUBJ^AL-1796. 61 

Adjourned until the afternoon Service is performed. 

Met according to adjournment. 

On motion, voted, that the number for a Standing Com- 
mittee shall be seven persons. 

The following Members were duly chosen, viz. 
The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Timothy Durkee, 
The Rev, Russel Oatlin, Stephen Hard, 

The Rev. James Nichols, David Lewis, 

Samuel Bliss. 

Resolved ; That a Committee of two persons be appointed 
to attend the General Convention. The vote being taken 
it appeared that the Rev. Russel Catlin and Col. Matthew 
Lyon were duly elected. 

Mr. John Whitlock was chosen Treasurer. 

Mr. Philunder Chase produced his Credentials of his char- 
acter and his profession in life, wishing to be admitted a 
Deacon in Orders, etc. The papers of Mr. Chase were read ; 
and, by the Conventio,n he was approved of for a Candidate 
to be admitted into Holy Orders. 

Voted, that the next Convention shall meet at Manches- 
ter, and that Divine Service shall begin at 10 o'clock fore- 
noon. 

The Rev. Russel Catlin was nominated and requested to 
preach the Sermon. 

Adjourned, sine die. 

Philander Chase, whose name appears in the foregoing journal 
as a candidate for Holy Orders, was born in Cornish, N. H., De- 
cember 14, 1775. He entered Dartmouth College in 179 1 and 
graduated in 1795. During his college course he became ac- 
quainted with the Liturgy of the Episcopal Church, and was 
guided in his enquiries by the counsel of the Rev. Bethuel Chit- 
tenden and the Rev. J. C. Ogden. Leaving the Congregational- 
ists, he became a decided Churchman. While acting as a school- 
master in Bethel, Vermont, he officiated as a lay reader in the little 
parish in that town. He pursued his theological studies at Al- 



62 JOURJ^AL-1796. 

bany, N. Y. In 1798, Mr. Chase was ordained Deacon, in St. 
George's Chapel, New York, by Bishop Provost; and a Priest, by 
the same, November 10, 1799. For several years he devoted him- 
self, amidst many privations, to missionary work in western New 
York. In 1805 he went to New Orleans and occupied himself 
zealously in organizing the Church in that city. Returning north 
in 1811, he became the Rector of Christ Church, Hartford, Conn. 
In 1817, he went to the State of Ohio. A Diocese having been 
formed, he was elected Bishop over it and was consecrated in St. 
James' Church, Pidladelphia, February 11, 1819. In 1823 he 
visited England for the purpose of raising funds for the establish- 
ment of a College and Theological Seminary in Ohio. He re- 
ceived donations in England, to the amount of $30,000. On his 
return, in 1824, he purchased 8000 acres of land, and gave to the 
institution which he founded, the name of Gambler and Kenyon, 
in honor of two English noblemen. On account of difficulties 
and misunderstandings in regard to the management of this prop- 
erty, he resigned the episcopate of Ohio in 1831. From Ohio he 
removed into Michigan and engaged in missionary work. In 
1835 he was elected Bishop of the Diocese of Illinois. Soon after 
this, he again visited England and collected $ 10,000 towards pur- 
chasing land and founding a College. In 1838 he founded Jubi- 
lee College at Robin's Nest. Here he spent the remainder of his 
life. He died September 20, 1852. Keenly sagacious in reading 
character, quick in availing himself of opportunities, full of zeal 
and determination, unwearied in laboring for the cause of religion 
and the interests of the Episcopal Church, Bishop Chase left his 
impress upon the western country, and deserves honorable men- 
tion as a pioneer bishop. 



JOVRKAL-1797-8. 63 

1797. 

Manchester, Sept. 20th, 1797. 

The Protestant Episcopal Convention of the State of 
Vermont convened at the dwelling-house of Doct. Abel 
Allis, in said Manchester. 

Eleazer Baldwin was elected President and Truman 
Squier, Secretary. 

Elkanah Cobb was appointed Secretary, pro tem. 

Voted, that the following persons be appointed a Stand- 
ing Committee, to wit ; 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Job Giddings, Esq., 

The Rev. Russel Catlin, Capt. Benoni Smith, 

Samuel Bliss, Nathan Canfield, Esq. 

Stephen Hard, Esq., 

Job Giddings, Esq. was, also, appointed Treasurer. 

Voted, that the Rev. Amos Pardee and Zadoc Hard be 
appointed a Committee to the General Convention, at Phil- 
adelphia. 

Voted, that the next Convention should be holden at 
Pawlet, and convene at the dwelling-house of Capt. Benoni 
Smith, in said Pawlet. 

The end of the annual Session of said Convention. 

Attest, Truman Squier, Sec'y as taken from Mr. Cobb's 
Minutes, - 



1798. 

Pawlet, Sept. 19th, 1798. 
At a Meeting of the Protestant Episcopal Convention of 
the State of Vermont, being duly convened at Capt. Benoni 
Smith's dwelling-house, in said Pawlet, the Rev. Ammi 
Rogers read prayers. 

Then the Convention proceeded to elect the Rev. Bethuel 
Chittenden, President, and Truman Squier, Secretary. 



64 JOURJ^AL-1798. 

The following Members were present, who took their seats, 

to wit. 

PAWLET : 

The Rev. Amos Paedee, Ceely Brown. 
Capt. Benoni Smith, 

CASTLETON : 

John Whitlock, 

WELLS: 

David Lewis, 

MANCHESTER: 

Philo Sperry, 

ARLINGTON ; 
Caleb Catton. 

The Rev. Ammi Rogers, of Ballston, and Philander Chase 
of Bethel, and Mr. Abraham Bristol of Grranville were in- 
vited to take seats in the Convention. 

On motion, the following Members were chosen Standing 
Committee : 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Nathan Canfield, Esq., 

The Rev. Amos Pardee, Capt. Benoni Smith. 

Samuel Bliss, 

Job Giddings, Esq, was chosen Treasurer. 

A Resolution appointing two Members to attend the Gen- 
eral Convention at Philadelphia was passed. The Members 
chosen were — 

The Rev. Amos Pardee, Zadoc Hard. 

On motion, voted, that the Secretary be requested to fur- 
nish a Certificate, to each of the Deputies appointed by the 
Convention, with a proper seal affixed thereto, signed by 
himself as Secretary to the Convention, which Certificate 
shall be considered sufficient evidence of their appointment. 

On Motion, voted, that the Secretary be directed to call 
a Special Meeting of this Convention by Circular Letters' to 
each of the Parishes within his knowledge, to have them 
send their Delegates to attend, if he finds the interest of the 
Church to require it. 



JOURJfAL-1798. Q5 

The Rev. Amnii Rogers of Ballston, N. Y., was appointed, 
and requested to preach at the Convention to be holden at 
Manchester on the 3d Wednesday of August next. 

Adjourned, sine die. 

TRUMAN SQUIER, Secretary. 



The vote in the foregoing Journal in regard to calHng a Spe- 
cial Convention, if the Secretary should deem such a step neces- 
sary, has respect, no douht, to the suit of the Select Men of 
Manchester against the Rev. Daniel Barber, then pending in the 
Circuit Court of the United States. This was a suit 0/ eject- 
ment brought by the Select Men to recover the Glebe, which was 
at the time of its commencement in the possession of Mr. Barber. 
It was brought under the Law of 1794, which gave the Select 
Men of those towns in which there were Glebe Rights, power to 
take possession of them, to lease them for a term of years, not 
exceeding fourteen, and to distribute the income, in case there 
was more than one religious teacher in the respective towns, " for 
the support of such teachers, in proportion to the number of rata- 
ble polls belonging to the respective congregations, and residents 
in such towns." 

The ground taken by the prosecution was, that the Glebe 
Grants were void because the Grantees named in the Charter 
were not in existence to receive. Against this it was contended, 
that at the time of the Grants, the Church of England had a 
corporate existence. The Court — Patterson, Judge, decided in 
favor of the defendant, pronouncing the Act of 1794 unconsti- 
tutional and void. No appeal was taken from this decision. 
Church Review, vol. iv, pp. 586, 587. 

But inasmuch as the early decisions in the Circuit Court were 
not reported, we know little of what was said by the learned 
Judge. He is reported by a distinguished jurist to have remark- 
ed in conclusion, that " Legislatures are not omnipotent. They 
cannot take this man's property and give it to that man." In his 
day this may have been true. Church Review, vol. iv, p. 587. 



66 JOUBJfAL-1798. 

Among the papers belonging to the Church in Manchester the 
following official report is found : 

"Samuel Pettibone ex dem"| 

Select Men of Manchester [ Judgt. of Cir. Court, 
vs. [October Term 1798. 

Daniel Barber. J 

Ejectment for lot No. 4-4, first div. 100 acres of the Glebe in 
Manchester. 

Verdict, that the deft, is not guilty, etc. 

Judgt. for deft, to receive his costs, * taxed by consent at forty- 
two dollars and fifteen cents.' 

Extract from the record. J. GOVE, Clk. 

June 23, 1823." 

In obedience to the above Decision at the Session of the Leg- 
islature in 1799, the following Act was passed, repealing the Act 
of 1794. 

*' It is hereby enacted hy the General Assembly of the State of Ver- 
mont^ That an act," directing the use of the rights of land in this 
State, heretofore granted by the British government, as glebes, 
for the benefit of the Church of England as by law established, 
" be, and hereby is repealed." 

Provided nevertheless, and it is hereby expressly declared^ That the 
repealing clause, aforesaid, shall not be construed to extend to, or 
in any way affect, any person or persons who are in possession of 
any lot, belonging to such glebe right, by virtue of a lease from 
the selectmen, as directed by law, of any town, where any such 
lands lie. And it is hereby declared, that the selectmen, where 
any such lands lie, are prohibited from leasing any such lands, in 
future." 

This act was passed, November 5, 1799. 



JOURJ^AL-1799. 67 

1799. 

Manchester, August 25th, 1799. 

At a meeting of the Protestant Episcopal Convention of 
the State of Vermont, being duly convened at said Man- 
chester, on the third Wednesday of August, A. D. 1799, 
the Kev. Amos Pardee read prayers, and the Kev. Ammi 
Rogers, of Ballston, preached the Sermon, 

Afterwards the Convention proceeded to the dwelling- 
house of Doct. Abel AUis in said Manchester ; and said 
Convention, being then and there duly met, made choice of 
the Eev.Bethuel Chittenden, President, and Truman Squier, 
Secretary. 

The following Members were present and took their seats 

accordingly, to wit. 

ARLINGTON: 

Nathan Canfield, Esq. Caleb Dayton, 
Zadoc Hard, Andrew Hawley. 

SANDGATE : 

Doct. John Watkins, Capt. Theop. Banson. 

SUNDERLAND : 
JOSIAH LOCKWOOD, 

MANCHESTER: 

Job Giddings, Jabez Hawley, 

Philo Sperry, Samuel French. 

DORSET : 

Asa Baldwin, David Gillett. 

RUPERT: 

Grove Moore, Esq. 

PAWLET: 

Celey Brown, Henry Wooster. 

WELLS: 

David Lewis. 

castleton: 
John Whitlock. 

SALISBURY: 

Stephen Hard, Esq. 



68 JOVBKAL-1799. 

The Kev. Mr. Rogers of Ballston, Doct. Smith of Still- 
water, Abijah Hubbell of Salem, and Mr. Whitlock of Balls- 
ton, were invited to take seats in this Convention, 

Also on motion, voted, that Messrs. Aaron Gaylor Ferris 
of Sandgate, John French of Dorset, Henry Ballis, Benjam- 
in Purdy and Alexander Prindle of Manchester be invited 
to take seats. 

Job Giddings, Esqr. was duly elected Treasurer. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Stephen Hard, Esqr., 

The Rev. Amos Pardee, John Whitlock, 

The Rev. Russel Catlin, 
were elected a Standing Committee. 

A letter from William Smith, Secretary of the Conven- 
tion of the Diocese of Connecticut, written by the order of 
the Bishop and Clergy of that Diocese, to the Standing 
Committee of the Diocese of Vermont, respecting the Rev. 
James Nichols, was read and ordered to lie on the table for 
consideration. 

The aforesaid Letter being taken up and read, the follow- 
ing Resolution was passed, viz. That this Convention do 
disapprove of the conduct of the Rev. James Nichols, and 
that they do recommend to the several Churches in this 
State not to employ him as a Clergyman until he pro- 
cures a Certificate from the Standing Committee that he 
has reformed his conduct and that he will do honor to his 
profession. 

Messrs Amos Pardee and Truman Squier were chosen 
Deputies to the General Convention, and, also, a Commit- 
tee to form a Constitution for this Convention. 

Resolved, That this Convention return their thanks to the 
Rev. Mr. Rogers for his services ; and that the Rev. Messrs. 
Chittenden and Pardee be appointed a Committee to wait on 
him with this Resolution, and request a Copy of his Sermon, 
this day delivered before the Convention, for the Press. 

There being no further business, the Convention adjourn- 
ed to the third Wednesday in August next, at Arlington. 



JOVRKAL-1800. 69 

1800. 

At a Meeting of the Protestant Episcopal Convention of 
the State of Vermont, being duly convened at Arlington on 
the third Wednesday in August, A. D. 1800, the Eev. Dan- 
iel Barber read Prayers, and the Eev. Henry Whitlock 
preached the Sermon. 

Afterwards the Convention proceeded to the usual busi- 
ness of the Meeting. The Eev. Daniel Barber wa& chosen 
President pro tern., and the following Members took their 
seats, viz. 

SANDGATE : 

Theophilus Eansom, John Watkins, 

Theophilus Hurd, James Bristol. 

MANCHESTER: 

Job Giddings, Joshua French, 

Jabez Hawley, ' John Eichardson. 

RUPERT : 

Grove Moore, Esq. 

ARLINGTON : 
Zadock Hard, Tyrus Hurd. 

CASTLETON .- 

John Whitlock. 

The Eev. Bethuel Chittenden was chosen President of 
the Convention for the year ensuing, and Truman Squier, 
Secretary. 

The Eev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Eev. Amos Pardee, 
the Eev. Eussell Catlin, John Whitlock, and Bethuel 
Chittenden, were chosen a Standing Committee. 

The Eev. Henry Whitlock and Zadock Hard were chosen 
Deputies to the General Convention of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States to be holden at 
Trenton, New Jersey. 

Job Giddings was appointed the Treasurer of the Con- 
vention. 



70 JO UBJ^AL-1 800. 

On motion, The Articles of Faith as proposed by the 
General Convention were read, (a) 

Voted, That an Application be made to the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, that they 
will be pleased to give a power of Attorney to certain Trus- 
tees in this State, or any other they shall choose, for the 
purpose of taking the avails of each Eight of Land, granted 
to them in this State, and appropriating the same to the 
Church Clergy officiating in this State, in such proportion 
as they shall direct, or in any other way they shall direct. 
Judge Livermore, of Holderness, N, H., 
Nathaniel Adams, of Portsmouth, N. H., 
Ambrose Cosset, of Claremont, N. H., 
Truman Squier, of Manchester, Ver., 
Oliver Gallup, of Hartland, Yer., 
were elected and recommended as Trustees, (b) 

Voted, to appoint a committee to lease the Glebe Lands, 
whereupon. 

Job Giddings, the Rev. Amos Pardee, Zadock Hard, Ste- 
phen Hard, the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, Nathaniel Bost- 
wick and John Newton, were appointed such a Committee. 

Resolved, by this Convention, That the Secretary make 
out a Power of Attorney in behalf of said Convention, 
empowering its Committee to lease said Lands, (c) 

Voted, that the next Meeting of this Convention be 
holden at Sandgate on the third Wednesday in August 
next ; and that a notice of said Meeting be published in three 
different Newspapers two months previous to the time of 
the next Meeting. Adjourned, sine die. 



(a.) This action of the Convention has reference to what was 
done in the General Convention of 1799, in respect to Articles of 
Eeligion. 

Saturday June 15th, 1799, in the House of Clerical and Lay 
Deputies, '' A resolution was proposed by Mr. Bisset, that the 



JOURJ^AL-1800. 71 

Convention now proceed to the framing of Articles of Religion 
for this Church. 

The question was taken by Yeas, and Nays, as follows : 

Clergy : Massachusetts, No ; Connecticut, Yea ; Rhode-Island, 
Yea; New- York, Yea; New- Jersey, Yea; Pennsylvania, Yea; 
Virginia, No; Delaware, Yea. 

Laity: Connecticut, Yea; New- Jersey, Yea; Pennsylvania, 
Yea; Virginia, No. 

So it was carried in the affirmative. 

Resolved, That the Committee shall consist of a member from 
each State now represented, who were chosen, and were as follows : 

Massachusetts, Dr. Walter; Connecticut, Dr. Smith; New-York, 
Mr. Bisset ; New-Jersey, Mr. Waddell ; Pennsylvania, Dr. An- 
drews ; Delaware, Mr. Clay ; Virginia, Dr. Bracken." 

" Tuesday Morning June 18; The Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on the Articles, reported seventeen Articles of Religion, which 
were read. Whereupon, on motion of Mr. Bisset, 

Resolved unanimously. That on account of the advanced period 
of the present session, and the thinness of the Convention, the 
consideration of the Articles now reported and read be postponed, 
and that the Secretary transcribe the Articles into the Journal of 
this Convention, to lie over for the consideration of the next 
General Convention." 

( b.) No information is now possessed in regard to the Appli- 
cation to the Propagation Society contemplated by this vote. It 
is well known, however, that, if it was made, it was not successful. 
This decided tone and action by the Convention in regard to the 
lands in question, shows a knowledge of the rights of the Church, 
and a calm and settled purpose to secure them. Some of the 
members of this Convention were men that could not easily be 
intimidated nor effectually baffled. 

( c.) To what extent this Committee acted one cannot now 
tell. The probability is that such of the Glebe Rights as were 
in those towns in which there was an Episcopal Church were at 
once leased. We learn from a letter of the Rev. Amos Pardee, 
written in 1839, giving an account o-f his labors in Vermont, that 
he proceeded to lease the Glebe Lands in those parishes under his 
care and that he received the rents of the same. 



72 JOUBJ\'AL-1801. 

1801. 

The Protestant Episcopal Convention of the State of 
Vermont being duly convened on the third Wednesday of 
August, A. D. 1801, at Sandgate, proceeded to the usual 
business of said Meeting. 

Clergy present : 
The Rev. Russell Catlin, The Rev. Amos Pardee. 

The Rev. Mr. Catlin read Prayers, and the Rev. Mr. 
Pardee preached the Sermon. 

The Rev. Russell Catlin was chosen President pro tern. 
Members present : 

ARLINGTON. 

Nathan Canfield, Zadock Hard. 

Curtis Hawley, ) 

James Lock wood, > who took seats by Invitation. 

Caleb Dayton. \ 

SANDGATE. 

Aaron G-. Ferris, George Peck, 

Theophilus Ransom. 

MANCHESTER. 
Joshua French, Truman Squier. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden was reelected President for 
the year ensuing, and the Rev. Amos Pardee was chosen 
Secretary. 

Job Giddings was elected Treasurer. 

Voted, to appoint a Standing Committee. 

The members chosen were. 
The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, The Rev. Russel Catlin, 
The Rev. Amos Pardee. 

Voted, to appoint Deputies to the General Convention 
to be holden at Trenton, New Jersey. 

The members chosen were. 

The Rev. Amos Pardee, Truman Squier. 



JOURMAL-1801. 73 

Voted, That the next Annual Convention be holden at 
Kutland in the County of Rutland, on the Third Wednes- 
day in Septemher, 1802, and that the time of said Meeting 
be duly notified by advertisement in the Bennington, Rut- 
land, Vergennes and Windsor Newspapers six weeks next 
previous to said meeting. 

Adjourned, sine die. 

Test. TRUMAN SQUIER, Secretary, 



The Deputies of the General Convention appointed by this 
Meeting did not, so far as now appears, attend to the duty as- 
signed them. During the Session of the General Convention at 
Trenton, there was a matter introduced and carried through of 
very serious import to the Diocese of Vermont. 

Friday, September 11th, 1801, the third day of the Session, — 
" The Rev. Dr. Parker, Rev, Mr. Shelton, and James Clark, Esq, 
were appointed a Committee to consider certain memorials pre- 
sented to this House from Churches in New-Hampshire and Ver- 
mont, and to report thereon." 

Saturday, September 12th, " The Committee appointed to con- 
sider the memorials from certain Churches in New-Hampshire 
and Vermont, made the following report, which was read, and 
unanimously adopted, viz : 

Report of the Committee : 

It appears from the memorials of certain Churches in the west- 
ern part of the State af New-Hampshire, and the eastern part of 
the State of Vermont, that, having agreed to and adopted the 
General Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, they are desirous of forming a junction, and unit- 
ing themselves, for the purpose of holding Conventions, and 
effecting a due organization of their Churches ; and, on account 
of the impracticability of joining with the other Churches in said 
respective States, they are desirous of being considered as a sepa- 
rate district. Your Committee are of opinion, that the 8th Canon 
of 1795, miUtates against the wishes of said memorialists, but 



74 JOURMAL-1801. 

that their local situation requires a dispensation from the opera- 
tion of said Canon, more especially as many valuable tracts of land 
have been granted to the Episcopal Church in those towns, and 
others in the vicinity, which land requires the attention of a duly 
organized Church for its preservation and improvement. Your 
Committee are therefore of opinion, that, from their peculiar cir- 
cumstances, they ought to be allowed to put themselves under the 
jurisdiction of a Bishop of one of the neighboring States, until a 
Bishop shall be duly consecrated and settled in said States, as the 
only measure that can relieve them under their peculiar situation 
and circumstances. 

(Signed by order,) S. PARKER." 

During the same day the following action was had in the House 
of Bishops in respect to the subject of this report : " This House 
received from the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies applica- 
tions from certain Churches of New-Hampshire and Vermont, 
respecting certain arrangements on account of their local circum- 
stances, w'hich papers were accompanied with a resolution of the 
House of Clerical and Lay Deputies concerning the same. This 
House concurred in the resolution." 

What was done in accordance with this permission, or, as it is 
termed by the New-Hampshire Convention, "dispensation from 
the eighth Canon of 1795, granted to the Rev. Daniel Barber," 
as far as has been ascertained is here inserted. Although the 
transactions extend through several years, yet it is deemed best to 
put the whole together in this place. The extracts from the un- 
published Journals of the Diocese of New-Hampshire have been 
kindly made by the Rev. William S. Perry then of Nashua. 

" At a Convention of the Clergy and Delegates of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Churches in New-Hampshire held at Concord the 
twenty-fifth day of August in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand eight hundred and two. Present, Reverend Joseph Willard, 
Rector of St. John's Church, in Portsmouth. Honorable James 
Sheafe and Nathaniel Adams, Esq. Delegates from St. John's 
Church, Portsmouth; Reverend Robert Fowle, Rector of the 
Church in Holderness. Honorable Arthur Livermore and Rich- 
ard Shepard, Esq. Delegates from the Church in Holderness ; 
Reverend Daniel Barber, Rector of the Church in Claremont; 



JOVRKAL-1801. 75 

Dudley Chase, Esq. and Mr. Nathaniel Hall, Delegates from the 
Church in Cornish." 

" Honorable Arthur Liverniore was appointed Chairman of this 
Convention. Nathaniel Adams, Esq. was appointed Secretary to 
the Convention. Rev. Joseph Willard, Rev. Daniel Barber and 
Nathaniel Adams, Esq., were appointed a Committee to draw up 
Rules of Order." 

After the Rules of Order, reported by this Committee had been 
adopted by the Convention, " The Rev. Mr. Barber and Dudley 
Chase, Esq., produced a Vote from the Convention of the Church- 
es in the Western part of New-Hampshire and Eastern part of 
Vermont, authorizing them to confer with this Convention on 
such measures as may probably tend to unite all the Protestant 
Episcopal Churches within the two States in one Diocese. Which 
being duly considered, 

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Convention that they 
are not authorized by their respective Churches to act upon the 
above measures." 

*' Rev. Mr. Fowle, Rev. Mr. Barber and Rev. Mr. Willard were 
appointed a Committee to draw up a Constitution for the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Churches in New-Hampshire." This Committee 
reported a form of a Constitution which was adopted and signed 
by the members of the Convention. The Rev. Daniel Barber did 
not sign it : The delegates from the Church in Cornish did. 
Having directed the Secretary to send copies of the Constitution 
to the several Churches in the State for approval or disapproval, 
the Convention adjourned. 

The following Letter of the Rev. Daniel Barber to the Rev, 
Dr. Parker of Boston, copied by the Rev. William S. Perry, of 
Nashua, N. H. from the original in his posession, affords some in- 
formation in regard to the course of the Rev. Mr. Barber, and the 
operations of this ecclesiastical organization in the valley of the 
Connecticut. 

" Claremont, October 18th, 1802. 

Reverend and Dear Sir, — 

I have requested Esquire Dunbar to deliver this. He is a 
gentleman of reputation. Any civility shewn him will be accept- 
ed as done to myself. 



76 JOURJ^AL-1801. 

The active part you took at the General Convention in favor of 
our Petition to be constituted a District with the Eastern part of 
Vermont meets my vparmest gratitude. By it, you have also most 
effectually secured the affection and esteem, not only of this 
Church, but all those in the Eastern part of Vermont. Bishop 
Bass, by his imprudent ordinations has done us much harm. It is 
said by many, he will ruin the Churches. This was the only rea- 
son these Churches would not consent to join Massachusetts, thus 
being under one Bishop. It was observed by many principal 
members at our late Convention, * was Doctor Parker Bishop we 
would join Massachusetts.' For the present we have put our- 
selves under Connecticut. 

It would be extremely pleasing, if you could make a visit in 
this part of the Country. As to the present situation of the 
Churches, etc., I shall refer you to Esqr. Dunbar who is a mem- 
ber of this Church. The dissenting minister has just resigned, 
and the probability is the parish will all come pver to the Church. 

I wish, if convenient, you would send me a few of the late Ab- 
stracts from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. I 
have thoughts of making apjilication to the said Society for a 
right or two of their Lands in Vermont to be given to this 
Church. What think you of it? What a pity that so much prop- 
erty as that Society holds in Vermont should lie useless and un- 
improved for the purpose for which it was granted. 

I wish you would give me your thoughts on that or any other 
topic which may be useful or in any measure profitable. 

I am Dear Sir, With the highest esteem. 

Your Friend and Brother, 

DANIEL BARBEK." 

The Reverend Dr. Parker. 

At the next Convention held at Concord January 19, 1803, the 
Rev. Mr. Barber was not in attendance. In this Convention, 
Ithamur Chase, Esq. was the Delegate from Cornish. The Rev. 
Samuel Mead, Rector of the Church in Alstead was present in 
the Convention, and elected a member of the Standing Commit- 
tee. After the appointment of Committees " to take possession 
of all the Glebe Lands in the Counties of Cheshire, Grafton and 
Strafford, and to lease them for such rents and for such term of 



JOURJTAL-lSOl. 77 

time as they may think proper, not exceeding ten years, the fol- 
lowing votes were passed ; 

" Voted, That the Standing Committee be desired to give notice 
to the several Churches that at the next Convention the question 
will be considered whether an invitation shall be given to the 
Bishop of some other Diocese to visit and perform the Episcopal 
Office in this State as occasion shall require." 

" Voted, That the Secretary write to the Church in Claremont, 
informing them that the Convention are desirous of an union of 
all the Churches in the State, and wish by all means to cultivate 
harmony and good fellowship among them and request their 
acceding to the Constitution." 

In 1804, the Convention of New-Hampshire met at Hopkinton. 
The Standing Committee was directed to address a Letter to the 
General Convention, informing them of the regular organization 
of the Diocese, and requesting that " the dispensation granted to 
the Rev. Daniel Barber" might be recalled. For some reason, 
the Committee failed to do the duty assigned them. In the 
Convention of 1807, holden at Concord on the third Wednesday 
in August, a vote similar to that of 1804, was passed. Accord- 
ingly the Standing Committee presented before the General Con- 
vention of 1808 the following communication : 

"To the Bishops, the Clerical and Lay Deputies of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in General 
Convention assembled : 
Right Reverend, Reverend and Beloved : 

At a Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Churches in the 
State of New-Hampshire holden in the year of our Lord 1804, 
the Standing Committee of that year were authorized, by a reso- 
lution for that purpose, to address a Letter to the next General 
Convention, which by accident was not complied with. A similar 
one was passed at the last Convention of the said Church, of which 
the inclosed is a copy, empowering the Standing Committee of 
the present year to perform that duty. In compliance with which 
they have now the pleasure to inform the General Convention 
that the Churches in the State of New-Hampshire have acceded 
to the general Ecclesiastical Constitution, Canons and regulations 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of Amer- 



78 JOUBJrJ.L-1801. 

ica ; that they have formed an Ecclesiastical Constitution for the 
government of the Episcopal Churches in this State, and that a 
State Convention has been regularly holden conformably thereto 
for three years past. But, with extreme regret, they are obliged 
to say that a Dispensation from the eighth Canon of 1795, granted 
to the Rev. Daniel Barber, by which a Convention was formed in 
the western part of this State, and the eastern part of the state of 
Vermont, militates greatly against the harmony of the Episcopal 
Churches in this State. It was granted without the knowledge 
of the Churches in this State and without any notice that such a 
separation was desired or contemplated, and, of course, without 
their concurrence. It causes a division among our Churches, 
which subjects us to great inconvenience, especially while our 
numbers are small. It produces a contention with respect to the 
property of the Churches in this State in the disposition of which 
we suppose the General Convention could have no authority and 
we believe no wish to- interfere. We .believe that the General 
Convention had no other than a pure and benevolent design in 
granting that dispensation, and, therefore, when we state that it 
has been in its effects so injurious to the prosperity and happiness 
of the Episcopal Churches in this State, we have reason to think 
and confidently hope, that the obstacle to these great and desira- 
ble ends will most cordially be removed by the General Conven- 
tion, and that their fatherly affection will be extended to us by 
giving the eighth Canon above mentioned its full and happy effect 
on our Churches in this State, and that the dispensation may be 
rescinded. 

In compliance with the 16th Canon of 1789, we send the annu- 
al list of Churches in this State. 

With high respect and sentiments of duty we are, etc., 

Robert Fowle, Arthur Livermore, 
James Sheafe, Nathaniel Adams, 

Standing-Committee of the Protestant Episcopal Churches in 
New-Hampshire." 

This ecclesiastical organization appears, from the preceding 
extracts, to have included only one Parish on the New-Hampshire 
Bide of the Connecticut. It is not now known bow many parishes 
on the Vermont side were embraced in it. Something material 



JOURMAL-1801. 79 

may be gathered from the Records of Immanuel Church, Bellows 
Falls. Several extracts will be given. 

"Rockingham, July 30, 1801. The members of the Protestant 
Episcopal Society in Rockingham are hereby notified to meet at 
the dwelling-house of S. Cutler, on Saturday the 8th of August 
next, at 6 o'clock, P. M. to choose Delegates to meet with a Con- 
vention to be holden at Claremont on the 14th of the same month, 
for the purpose of forming a union of the several Episcopal Socie- 
ties in New-Hampshire, on the east, and Vermont on the west side 
of the Connecticut River ; and, also, for the purpose of adopting 
the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the 
United States. 

Signed, ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, Clerk." 

Written in pencil under this warrant; "No minutes of this 
meeting to be found. A. F." Records, p. 24. 

At a meeting of the Society regularly called April 11, 1803, 
after other acts the following votes were passed ; 

" Voted, That William Page, Dr. Campbell, Peter Evans, and 
Samuel Cutler be Members to sit in Convention to be holden at 
Rockingham, on the first Wednesday in September next." 

" Voted, That Samuel Cutler make provision for the entertain- 
ment of the members of the Convention." 

Signed, SAMUEL CUTLER, Clerk. 
Records, p. 19. 

At an adjourned annual meeting held June 5, 1804, the sixth 
item of business transacted is noted as follows : 

"Appointed Dr. Campbell, Peter Evans and Samuel Cutler, 
Members to attend the General Convention to be holden at Wea- 
thersfield in August next." Records, p. 19. 

June 4, 1805, at an adjourned annual meeting, the sixth item 
of business recorded is the following : 

"Appointed Dr. Campbell, Peter Evans, Dr. Page and Samuel 
Cutler, Members to attend the General Conveution to be holden 
at Westminster on the last Wednesday of August next." Rec- 
ords, p. 20. 

At an adjourned meeting August 4, 1806, " appointed Dr. 
Campbell, Peter Evans, and Samuel Cutler, Members to attend 



80 JOURJfAL-1801. 

the General Convention to lie holden at Clareinont the present 
year." Records, p. 21. 

Auo-ust 12, 1807, the sixth and seventh items of business 
transacted in the Parish meeting were the following : 

" Chose Peter Evans, Alexander Campbell and Quartus Mor- 
gan, Delegates to attend the Convention of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Churches to be holden at Hartland, on the 3d Wednesday 
in September next." 

" Voted, That fifteen Dollars be appropriated to defray the 
expenses of the Rt. Rev. Bp. Jarvis in attending the Churches 
in September next, and that the Wardens be authorized to draw 
it from the Treasury." Records, pp. 22, 23. 

The parish meeting August 13, 1808, "chose Deacon Evans, 
Dr. A. Campbell, Alex. Byington and Samuel Cutler to attend 
the Convention to be holden at Rockingham on the third Wed- 
nesday of September next." Records, pp. 23, 24. 

The parish meeting August 19, 1809, " chose Dr. Campbell, 
Peter Evans, Peter Evans jr., and Solomon Hapgood, Delegates 
to the Annual Convention." The Record is the same for August 
23, 1810. Records, pp. 31, 33. 

The parish meeting September 4, 1811, " chose Dr. Campbell, 
Samuel Cutler and Peter Evans to represent the Society in any 
Episcopal Convention that may be holden in Vermont the en- 
suing year." Records, p. 35. 

The action and phraseology are nearly the same as that under 
the last date, for several years subsequently. 

The following extracts from the Records of the Parish in 
Weathersfield may properly be "inserted here as adding somewhat 
to our knowledge of this anomalous and ill-advised ecclesiastical 
organization. 

The Parish meeting, at Weathersfield, July 7th, 1802, " Voted 
and chose Oliver Kidder, Zenas Clark, Nathaniel Stoughton, Esq. 
and Amos Cole, Delegates to sit in the Convention at Claremont 
in August or September next." 

April 14th, 1803, the Parish meeting, "Voted and chose Zenas 
Clark and Nathaniel Stoughton, Delegates to sit in the Conven- 
tion at Rockingham in September next." 

May 7th, 1804, The Parish meeting, " Voted and chose Oliver 



JOVRKAL-1801. 81 

Kidder and Zenas Clark, Delegates." The warning for this 
meeting sjioke of the " Convention to he holden at Weathersfield 
in the State of Vermont on the last Wednesday of August 
next." 

Having regard to the foregoing notes, we may conclude that 
in Vermont there were three parishes connected with this organ- 
ization, viz. Rockingham, Weathersfield and Westminster. Per- 
haps Hartland should be included. Conventions appear to have 
been holden as follows: at Claremont, N. H. August 14th, 1801» 
and August or September, 1802; at Rockingham, Vt. on the 
Ist Wednesday in September, 1803; at Weathersfield on the last 
Wednesday in August, 1804; at Westminster on the last Wed- 
nesday in August, 1805; at Claremont in 1806; at Hartland on 
the third Wednesday in September, 1807; at Rockingham on the 
third Wednesday in September, 1808. 

The action of the General Convention of 1808, taken in con- 
sequence of the memorial from the New-Hampshire Convention, 
seems to have broken up this ecclesiastical association in the val- 
ley of the Connecticut. The course of action adopted by the 
Church in New-Hampshire and Vermont appears to have been 
courteous and conciliatory. By the Convention of New-Hamp- 
shire, holden at Concord, in August, 1808, the Rev. Daniel Bar- 
ber, though he was not present in it, was appointed one of the 
Standing Committee. At the Convention of 1809, the Rev. Mr. 
Barber was present and elected a member of the Standing Com- 
mittee and invited to preach before the next Convention. In the 
Record of that Convention, Mr. Barber's name stands at the head 
of the Standing Committee, as though he was the President. 
Mr. Barber attended the Convention of 1810, preached and was 
elected President of the Standing Committee. Journals Gen. 
Con. vol. i, pp. 340, 343, 355, 356. 

The following memorandum may be of use to those who care to 
understand the relation formerly existing between the Churches 
in Vermont and to observe the effect of the disunion sentiment, 
and the gradual return of the Churches to better views and 
conduct. 



82 JOURJfAL-1801. 

In the Convention at Arlington, 1790, Jesse Gilbert, of Weath- 
ersfield was present as a delegate. September 18, 1793, the Con- 
vention met at Pavvlet. The Rev. J. C. Ogden of Hartland was 
present. September 21, 1796, the Convention met at Arlington. 
Philander Chase was present as a Delegate from Bethel, and Sam- 
uel Bliss of Strafford was appointed a member of the Standing 
Committee. He was elected to the same office by the Convention 
at Manchester September 20, 1797. In the Convention at Pawlet, 
September 19, 1798, Philander Chase of Bethel was present, and 
Samuel Bliss was again appointed a member of the Standing 
Committee. By the Convention at Arlington, on the third Wed- 
nesday of August 1800, Oliver Gallup, of Hartland, was proposed 
as one of the Trustees to receive a conveyance of the Society 
Lands. In 1807, the Convention was appointed at Hartland on 
the third Wednesday in September. This appointment, either by 
accident or design, agreed with the time set for the Connecticut 
Valley Convention at the same place. "A few members only 
being present, no business was done," and the Convention adjourn- 
ed to meet at Rutland on the 7th of October. At this adjourned ' 
meeting no Delegate was present from the east side of the Mount- 
ain. August 29, 1810, the Convention met at Middlebury, adopt- 
ed a new Constitution for the Convention of this State, and the 
proposed Constitution of the Eastern Diocese. No list of the 
members of this Convention was preserved. The facts, that the 
Hon. Dudley Chase and Dr. Edward Campbell ivere chosen mem- 
bers of the Standing Committee, and that Dr. Samuel Cutler of 
Rockingham, appointed by the parish in that town to represent it 
" in any Episcopal Convention in Vermont " during that year, was 
elected one of the Deputies to the General Convention of 1811, 
from this Diocese, may indicate that these gentlemen were present 
as Delegates. In the Convention at Wells, June 26, 1811, which 
was attended by Bishop Griswold, no Delegate was in attendance 
from the eastern part of the State ; but the name of Dudley Chase 
appears in the Standing Committee for the year ensuing. In the 
Convention at Fairfield, June 22, 1814, no Delegate from the 
eastern side of the State was present. Dr. Samuel Cutler, how- 
ever, was appointed one of the Delegates to the Diocesan Conven- 
tion. In the Convention at Vergennes, June 26, 1816, no Dele- 



JOUBJ{AL-1802. 83 

gates from the eastern side of the Mountain were present. The 
Hon, Dudley Chase and the Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard were, 
however, appointed Delegates to the Convention of the Eastern 
Diocese, and Thomas Leverett Esq. as a substitute for Mr.. Hub- 
bard. In the Convention at Middlebury on the fourth Tuesday in 
June, 1817, Windsor was for the first time represented — Thomas 
Thomas Esq. being a Delegate, and the Rev. George Leonard be- 
ing present as an invited member. In the Convention at Windsor, 
May 22, 1818, the Rev. George Leonard and the Hon. J. H. Hub- 
bard were present as members. The Rev. George T. Chapman 
and James Iredell Cutler were present, also,' as members from 
Bellows Falls. 



1802. 

EuTLAND, September 15th, 18(52. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met agreeable to appointment. 

The Eev. Bethuel Chittenden read Prayers and the Rev. 
Abraham Bronson of the Diocese of Connecticut delivered 
a Sermon. 

Members present : 

SHELBURN: 

The Rev, Bethuel Chittenden. 

RUTLAND: 

Darius Chipman, Esq., John A. Graham, Esq., 

Major William Lee, Capt. David Tuttle, 

Mr. Daniel Haskins, 

CLARENDEN : 

Jonathan Parker, Jr., Esq. 

CASTLETON : 

Mr. John Whitlock. 

WELLS : 

Stephen Clarke, Esq. 



84 JOURNAL-ISO^. 

The Kev. Mr. Bronson of the Diocese of Connecticut was 
requested to sit as a Member of this Convention. 

The Kev. Bethuel Chittenden was elected President, and 
the Kev, Abraham Bronson, Secretary, pro tem. 

Voted, That the thanks of this Convention be presented 
to the Rev. Mr. Bronson for his Sermon this day delivered 
before the Convention. 

Voted, That the Kev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev Rus- 
sel Catlin and Stephen Hard, Esq. of Salisbury, be the 
Standing Committee of this Convention for the ensuing 
year. 

Voted, That Truman Squier, Esq. be the Secretary of 
this Convention for the ensuing year. 

Voted, That the next Meeting of the Convention of this 
Church be held at the house of David Lewis in Wells. 

Adjourned. 

Test. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, 

Secretary pro tem. 



A name appears for the first time in the records of the Church 
in Vermont in the foregoing meagre account of the Convention 
at Rutland which should ever be had in honor — that of Abraham 
Bronson, then a young man. In subsequent years of much de- 
pression, uncertainty and keen conflict with the civil power, his 
name to Churchmen was a tower of strength. The Church in 
Vermont owes to no man so much of gratitude as to him. By his 
sagacity, prudence, zeal and calm decision, he led it safely through 
much difficulty ; and he had the satisfaction in a few years of 
seeing it firmly established and prosperous. 

The following paragraph from Mr. Bronson's Historical Letters, 
respecting the time of this Convention, may be here appropriate. 

" The Rev. Amos Pardee, an acquaintance and distant connec- 
tion of mine, had for several years been officiating in Vermont, 
but in 1801, was called to Lanesborough, Mass. Early the next 
Summer, learning that I had left Rhode Island, he invited me to 



JOURJ^AL-1802. 85 

visit him, with a view to a settlement at the north. In September, 
I took the proposed journey, visited Arlington, Manchester and 
Wells, found Mr. Chittenden at Castleton and assisted him to hold 
a Convention, with a few Lay delegates at Rutland. The state 
of the Church was everywhere sufficiently discouraging. The 
two societies in Arlington and Manchester, about ten miles dis- 
tant from each other, had Glebes, which together might be worth 
180 dollars a year; and the few Churchmen in both places, might 
contribute about $ 120, more. Wells and Pawlet with Hampton, 
N. Y. were in some better situation. But as Mr. Chittenden was 
able to spend some three or four months in the year with them, 
it appeared most suitable that I should decline the invitation to 
remain there, and should take charge of the two former societies, 
which were entirely destitute of public worship. In Manchester 
I was engaged permanently for one share of the time and in 
Arlington by the year for the other ; and this engagement in the 
latter place was renewed annually for 23 years. But I took up 
my residence in the former place on account of the permanent 
engagement." Episcopal Recorder, Feb. 21, 1835. Gambler 
Observer, Oct. 17, 1834. 

During the Session of the Legislature at Burlington in the 
Fall of 1802, a renewed effort was made to sequester the Glebe 
Reservations. As a part of the history of the time, what was 
said and attempted, by resolutions and reports in that Assembly, 
is here transcribed from the Journal. 

Thursday, October 28th, Mr. Undey Hay of Underbill offered 
in the House the following preamble and resolution : " Whereas 
some of the public rights of land, in sundry towns within this 
state, are become very valuable, and would be immediately occu- 
pied, did not doubts arise as to the power of selling or leasing 
the same : 

Resolved, That a Committee, consisting of a member from 
each county, be appointed, to examine into the situation of those 
rights, state the facts arising from that examination, and make 
report to this House what, in their opinion, ought to be done, to 
remedy the above defect. 

Ordered, That Mr. Moses Robinson, Mr. Samuel Porter, Mr. 
Chauncey Smith, Mr. Alden Spooner, Mr. Daniel Smith, Mr. 



86 JO URJfA L~l 802. 

Jonathan Fisk, Mr. Undey Hay, Mr. Reuben Blancbard, Mr, Levi 
House, Mr. Jesse Olds, and Mr, Hains French, be the Members 
of said Committee." Journal, 1802. p. 144. 

Saturday, November 6th, " On Motion, Mr, Charles Rich was 
appointed a member of the Committee upon the resolution res- 
pecting public lands, in room of Mr. Daniel Smith, absent. 

Ordered, That the said Committee join such Committee as the 
Governor and Council may appoint." Journal, 1802, pp, 227, 228. 

" The Committee appointed upon the Resolution respecting 
the Public Lands, made the following Report : 

Burlington, Nov, 10, 1802, 
To the Honorable General Assembly now in Session : 

Your Committee, to whom was referred the consideration of 
this resolution, have duly attended to the business of our appoint- 
ment, so far as the scanty portion of time, and the exigences of 
other legislative business would admit. We have directed our 
enquiry to the two rights of land, contained in the several New- 
Hampshire grants in this State, to wit, the rights known by the 
name of the Society, or Propagation Rights, and the rights 
known by the name of the Glebe Rights. As to the first men- 
tioned rights, we find that they were granted, in trust, to a Socie- 
ty in Great Britain, for the purpose of the propagation of the 
Gospel in foreign parts : We also find that by an Act of the 
General Assembly of this State, passed October 30, 1794, it was 
considered, that as the aforesaid Society was a Corporation created 
by, and existing within, a foreign jurisdiction, to which alone 
they were amenable, by reason whereof, and on the principles of 
the revolution, the said lands became vested in this State, and 
by the said Act the said land was granted to the several towns in 
which such lands lay, for the sole use of schools in said towns ; 
which said Act of the Legislature remains in full force. And, in 
the opinion of your Committee, the said Act was passed on prin- 
ciples of sound policy, and consistent with the law of nations, 
and society. And we further find, that an Act of the Legislature, 
at their Session aforesaid, did grant and appropriate the rights 
denominated and known by the name of the Glebe Lands, to the 
several towns, for the purpose of the support of religious worship 



JOUBJ^AL-1802. 87 

in the several towns, in which such lands did lie ; and ^he sa^ 
Legislature have, by a subsequent Act, repealed the Act last 
af:?esaid, without' .aldng any provision for the ^-ther care^ of 
said rights, or appropriating the avaUs ans^ng the.efrom^ 
And we find that there- are persons in possession of some of sa d 
lands, without any claim thereto, and are making great was e 
therein, and not'liable to account with any person or socre y 
therefor, and that, in some instances persons in -^^^]f .f^\2 
the Episcopal Church are, without having the authority of law 
therefor, le'asing out, or endeavour to lease out tl^e af^-^ 
Glebe Land, which if suffered, the avails of said rights will be 
appropriated perhaps, directly m opposition to the principles of 
our government, as established by constitution. 

And it is farther the opinion of your Committee, that, as the 
Glebes were granted under the authority of ^-^^J^^^^);;' "^^ 
for the sole purpose of supporting the National Religion o tha 
Kingdom, as established by law, and we do consider that on the 
pldples of our Revolution, and the Treaty of 1783, between 
the United States and Great Britain, all jurisdiction was relin- 
quished by that government, and of course all claim to property 
sequestered or granted for national, public - pi-s uses,^en 
up ; and as the laws of a foreign country or state for establishmg 
a Church or national Religion, can have no effect within our 
government, neither by the law of nations, or any existing treaty 
nor consistent with the principles of our government: Therefore 
we do report as our opinion, that the said Glebe Lands are vested 
in and at the disposal of this State ; and do further report that 
in'our opinion the said Glebe Land ought to be granted and ap- 
propriated to and for the use of County Grammar Schools, m the 
several counties in which such lands lie. 

PAUL BRIGHAM, for Committee. 

Ordered, That the said report be accepted. , _ 

Mr. Undey Hay moved that a Committee be appointed, to 
prepare and report a Bill agreeably thereto. The question being 
taken upon this motion, it passed in the negative. 

On motion of Mr. Theophilus Harrington, of Clarendon _ 
Resolved, That the said report be referred to the next Session 
of the General Assembly." Journal. 1802, pp. 264, 26o, 266. 



88 JOURMAL-1803. 

In 1802, Paul Brigham was the Lieutenant Governor. This 
fact gives to the foregoing remarkable document a sort of official 
dignity and importance. 



1803. 

At a Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church of 
the State of Vermont hoklen at Wells on Wednesday the 
21st day of September, the following Members were present, 
viz. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson. 

ARLINGTON: 

Zadock Hard, Esq., Mr. Caleb Dayton. 

PAWLET: 

Mr. Henry Wooster, Jun. 
TINMOUTH : 

Mr. Abraham Gillett, Mr. Elihij Andrews. 

CASTLETON : 

Mr. John Whitlock. 

RUPERT: 

Mr. James Linn. 

WELLS : 

Stephen Clark, Esq., Mr. RobSert Hotchkiss, 

Mr. David Levs^is, and others. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden was chosen President, and 
the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Secretary. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. Abraham Bron- 
son, Mr. David Lewis, and Mr. Zadock Hard were appoint- 
ed the Standing Committee. 

Resolved, That the next Convention of the Church in 
this State be held at Manchester, on the third Wednesday 
of September next. 

Adjourned. 

Test. ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



JOUBMAL-1803. 89 

In the General Assembly of Vermont, holden at Westminster 
in the Fall of 1803, the subject of the Glebe Lands was again 
brought up and an effort made to sequester them for the use and 
benefit of Schools. 

Wednesday, October 17th. The Report of a Committee rela- 
tive to the public lands, referred from the last Session of the 
General Assembly, was called up, and referred to a Committee of 
five, to join with a Committee of Council." 

Members chosen : Lewis R. Morris, Springfield ; Amos Marsh, 
Vergennes ; Undey Hay, Underbill ; Jonathan Baker, Arlington ; 
Samuel C. Crafts, Craftsbury. Journal, 1803, p. 43. 

Tuesday, November 1st. "The Committee to whom was re- 
ferred the report of a committee on the subject of public lands, 
heretofore granted by the British Government as Glebes, for the 
benefit of the Church of England, referred from the last Session, 
made the following Report. 

Westminster, November 1, 1803. 
To the General Assembly now sitting : 

Your Committee to whom was referred the consideration of 
the within Report, having attended to the subject matter thereof, 
are of opinion, that the Glebe Lands therein mentioned were 
either never vested in any person or body by the British Govern- 
ment, or if they were, that the property ceased at the severance 
of the United States from the British Empire, and that they 
ought to be applied to the support of town schools in the several 
towns, in which they respectively lie, under such restrictions and 
regulations as the Assembly shall see fit. 

Which Report was read and accepted, and made the order of 
the day for Thursday afternoon." ' Journal, 1803, p. 169. 

Saturday, November 5th. "The Committee to whom was 
referred the Report of a coramitte of the last Session of the 
Assembly, respecting Public Lands, made report thereon, which 
was accepted, and ordered to be recommitted." Journal, 1803, 
p. 200. 

" The Committee to whom was referred the Petition respecting 
the disposal of the Public Lands, made report thereon, which was 
read and accepted. Whereupon, A Bill, entitled an Act directing 



90 JOURJfAL-1803. 

the uses of the rights of land in this State, heretofore granted by 
the British Government, as Glebes for the benefit of the Church 
of England, as by Law established, was read and ordered to lie 
on the table as order of the day for to-morrow afternoon." Tues- 
day Nov. 8th. Journal, 1803, p. 238. 

The Petition spoken of above has not been identified. There 
are a great many petitions mentioned in the Journal of this year 
as being introduced, read and referred without any indication of 
what was asked for. 

Thursday, November 10th. " A Bill entitled an Act directing 
the uses of the rights of land in this State, heretofore granted by 
the British Government, as Glebes for the benefit of the Church 
of England, as by law established, with the amendment proposed 
by the Committee to whom it was referred, was read and accepted ; 
and on the question, shall the Bill pass, the yeas and nays, being 
demanded by Mr. Jonathan Baker, were : 

Yeas — Messrs John Anderson, Ira; Joseph Armingtou, Water- 
ford ; Zenas Allen, Tinmouth ; Timothy Allen, South-Hero ; 
Elijah Bailey, Reedsboro; Sylvester Bishop, Marlboro; Samuel 
Boutel, Stratton ; Asa Briggs, Plymouth ; Joshua Bailey, New- 
bury; Joel Brownson, Richmond; Joseph Beeman, Fairfax; 
Beech, ; Brown, ; Timothy Castle, Wilming- 
ton; Oliver Church, Fairhaven ; Timothy Cruttenden, Poultney; 
Benjamin Clap, Barnard ; Asahel Chamberlin, Strafford ; Jesse P. 
Carpenter, Huntington ; John Cameron, Ryegate ; Ithiel Cargill, 
Brunswick; Benajah Douglass, Brandon ; Daniel Dana, Guildhall; 
Mills De Forest, Lemington; Isaac Eddy, Pittsfield ; Enoch 
Emmerson, Rochester; Benjamin Emmons, Woodstock; Seth 
Emmons, Vineyard ; Theophilus Flagg, Hubbardton ; David 
Foot, Cornwall ; Elisha Fuller, New-Haven ; Isaiah Fisk, Wind- 
bam; Jacob Galusha, Shaftsbury ; Edmond Graves, Sunderland; 
Robert Hawley, Bristol ; Elijah Hammond, Thetford ; Undey Hay, 
Underbill ; Benjamin Holmes, Georgia ; Joseph Herrick, Granby ; 
Daniel Jewett, Putney; Elias Jones, Reading; Gains Kibbe, 
Minehead ; Timothy Miller, Sudbury ; William Marsh, Shrews- 
bury ; Theophilus Middlebrooks, Ferrisburgh ; Amos Marsh, Ver- 
gennes ; H. E. G. McLaughlin, Topsham ; John Noyes, Guilford ; 
Ruben Nash, Benson; Samuel Porter, Dummerston; Joseph Perry- 



JOUBJ^AL-ISOS. 91 

Pomfret; Silas Pond, Panton; James A, Potter, Jericlio ; Martin 
Powell, Westford; Gershom Palmer, Calais; Samuel Peckham, 
Huntsburgli; Samuel Shaw, Castleton ; Pliny Smith, Orwell; 
James Smith, Cavendish ; Alvin Simons, Weston ; Gideon Segar, 
Addison; Daniel Smith, Monkton; Ruben Saxton, Salisbury; 
Timothy Stanley, Greensboro; James Tabor, Randolph; Silas 

Wright, Weybridge ; Wheatley, ; Samuel Wetherbee, 

Concord ; Webber, . 

Nays Messrs. Ebenezer Allen, Newfane ; Jonathan Allen, Bar- 
ton ; Jonathan Baker, Arlington ; Darius Bullock, Halafax ; Ru- 
ben Blanchard, Peacham ; Jonas Brigham, Bakersfield ; Hubbard 
Barlow, Fairfield; Ebenezer Corse, Duxbury; Samuel Chamber- 
lin, Danville ; Joshua Clap, Montgomery ; Josiab Dana, Chelsea ; 
Elkanah Danforth, Woodford ; Nathaniel Edson, St. Johnsbury ; 
Samuel Eaton, Jr., Johnson; Bethuel Finney, Stamford ; James 
Fisk, Barre; Jonathan Fisk, Williamstown ; Joseph Fisher, 
Cabot; Richard Hurd, Sandgate ; Arad Hunt, Vernon; Caleb 
Hendee, Pittsford ; Eleazer Hubbard, Berlin ; John Hutchinson, 
Braintree; Samuel Hazeltine, Corinth; Stephen House, Enos- 
burgh; Nathaniel Hutchins, North-Hero; Timothy Hinman, 
Derby ; Lent Ives, Wallingford ; Joshua Isham, Shelburn ; Jabez 
Jones, Bolton; Phineas Kitchel, Bridport; Bradford Kinney, 
Plainfield ; Aaron Leland, Chester ; David Lewis Ludlow ; Nathan 
Leavenworth, Jr., Hinesburgh ; Benjamin Muzzy, Jamaca ; Lewis 
R.Morris, Springfield; Joel Marsh, Sharon; Jonathan Mc Cum- 
ber, Groton; Joseph Marsh, Coventry; Jesse Olds, Westfield ; 
Abner Perry, Wardsboro ; Gamaliel Painter, Middlebury ; Andrew 
B. Peters, Bradford ; Daniel Peasley, Washington ; Seth Paine, 
Tunbridge; Seth Putnam, Middlesex; Bissel Phelps, W^aitsfield ; 
Seth Pomeroy, St. Albans ; Thomas H. Parker, Eden ; Ralph 
Parker, Glover; Nathan Robbinson, Bennington; Ephraim Ranny, 
Jr., Westminster; Samuel Rich, Charlotte ; Nathan Robbinson 
Stow; Elisha Reynolds, Alburgh ; Theophilus Harrington, Claren- 
don, Speaker of the House ; James Shafter, Athens ; Levi Sabin, 
Rockingham; Elias Stevens, Royalton ; Alden Spooner, Wind- 
sor; Nathaniel Stoughton, Weathersfield ; John Stacy, Orange; 
Wright Spaulding, Moretown ; Lemuel Scott, Fletcher; Elijah 
Strong, Brownington; James Tarbox, Randolph; Thaddeus 



92 JOURMAL-1804. 

Tnttle, Burlington; Thomas Taylor, Wolcott ; D. Tuthill, ; 

Stephen Underhill, Missisquoi ; Solomon Wright, Pownal ; Lem- 
uel Whitney, Brattleborough ; John B. Wheeler, Grafton; 
Phineas Williams, Bridgewater ; Joseph Woodworth, Montpelier; 
Amherst W^illoughby, Berkshire. 

So it passed in the negative, yeas, 69, nays, 77, and the Bill 
was by order dismissed." Journal, 1803, pp. 258, 259. 

The House, according to the List of Members, consisted of 183, 
From this it would appear that 37 Members did not vote on this 
Bill. It was, however, late in the session and several had been 
excused and gone to their homes. 



1804. 

Manchestee, Sept. 19, 1804. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met agreeable to appointment. 

The Kev. Abraham Bronson performed Divine Service 
and the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden delivered a sermon. After 
the religious exercises it was found that the following gen- 
tlemen were Members, viz. 

The Kev. Bethuel Chittenden, 
The Kev. Abraham Bronson. 

ARLINGTON: 

Mr. Caleb Dayton, Mr. Dominicus Grey. 

PAWLET: 

Mr. JosiAH Smith. 

WELLS: 

Mr. Kaymond Hotchkiss. 

SANDGATE : 

Mr. Nichols Randall. 

DORSET : 

Mr. John French. 

MANCHESTER : 

Truman Squier, Esq., Lazarus Beardslee, 

Messrs. Moses Sperry, Joshua French, 

Benjamin Purdy, jr. Martin Kobberts. 
John Hogaboom, 



JOTJEKAL-1804. 93 

The Eev. Bethuel Chittenden was chosen President, and 
the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Secretary. 

Eesolved, that the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. 
Abraham Bronson and Mr. David Lewis be the Standinsr 
Committee for the ensuing year. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention be pre- 
sented to the Rev. Mr. Chittenden for his excellent sermon, 
delivered this day. 

Resolved, That the future Meetings of the Conventions 
of this Church be on the Fourth Wednesday of September, 
annually. 

Resolved, That the next Meeting of the Convention of 
this Church be held at the West Church in Arlinston. 

Adjourned. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



As usual the matter of the Glebe Lands was, in various forms, 
before the General Assembly, which in 1804 held its Session at 
Rutland. In order to give a connected history of these Lands, 
and of public sentiment in regard to them, what was attempted 
in that body will be transcribed from the Journal of that year. 

Saturday, October 13, 1804, " The Petition of Benjamin Jac- 
queth was read, and referred to Messrs. David Hibbard, Samuel 
Beech, Elam Jewett, Jr., Jonas Brigbam, Erastus Safford." 

" The Petition of Benjamin Burtch was read and referred to 
the Committee appointed on the petition of Benjamin Jacqueth 
and otbers." 

This last named Petition was presented before the adjourned 
Session of the Legislature held at Windsor in January and Feb- 
ruary of this year, and referred to the present Session. Journal 
of the session at Windsor, 1804, pp. 35, 36. Journal, Session at 
Rutland, 1804, p. 23. 

" The Petition of sundry inhabitants of Danby was read and 
referred to the Committee appointed on the petition of Benjamin 
Jacqueth and others." Journal, 1804, p. 73. 



94 JOTJKJ\'AL-180Jf- 

"The Petition of a number of the inhabitants of Tinmouth, 
was read and referred to a Committee appointed on the petition 
of Benjamin Jacqueth and others." Journal, 1804, p. 77. 

" On motion of Mr. Elihu Luce of Hartland, Resolved, That 
a Committee of five be appointed, to join such Committee as the 
Council may appoint, to make enquiry concerning the Glebe 
Lands in the several towns in this State, and make report to this 
House, whether the said Lands belong to this State, and if so, in 
what way they shall be disposed of." 

Members chosen, Messrs. Asa Lyon, South Hero; Titus Hutch- 
inson, Woodstock; Samuel Shaw, Castleton ; Daniel Dana, Guild- 
hall ; Ezra Butler, Waterbury. Journal, 1804, p. 128. 

Monday, October 29th, "The Committee appointed, pursuant 
to the Resolution, introduced by Mr. Luce, to make enquiry con- 
cerning the Glebe Lands, made report, That the said Glebe Lands 
do belong to this State, and ought to be speedily chartered out 
to the best advantage, to the use of the State ; the avails to be 
apportioned from time to time as the Legislature may direct. 
Which report was read and accepted, and the Resolution recom- 
mitted, with directions to the Committee to bring in a Bill agree- 
able to the report." Journal, 1804, pp. 207, 208. 

Wednesday, October 31st, " The Committee to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of Benjamin Jacqueth and others, praying for 
the grant of the Glebe Lands in Hartland, made report, That 
the prayer thereof ought not to be granted. Which report was 
read and ordered to lie on the table." 

" The Committee to whom was referred the petition of Benja- 
min Burtch, stating, that he formerly expended large sums of 
money in building a court-house and gaol in Woodstock, near 
to his own house, expecting to receive compensation for the same, 
from the privileges and benefits which he should derive, in con- 
sequence of the contiguity of those buildings to his house and 
property; that the said court-house, shortly after its erection, was 
consumed by fire, and a new one erected, and likewise a new gaol, 
both of which were built at a distance from the petitioner's house, 
by reason whereof he has failed of receiving those benefits and 
advantages which he expected to receive, and has sustained 
a great loss of property, and therefore praying the Legislature 



-^JOTJRKAL-ISOB. 95 

to make him compensation, by granting him all those lands known 
by the name of the Glebe Lands, in the several towns in this 
State, which were chartered by the Governor of New-Hampshire, 
or such part of them as the Legislature shall think proper, made 
report, That the prayer of the petition ought not to be granted. 
Which 7-eport was read and accepted, and leave granted to with- 
draw the petition." Journal, 1804, pp. 236, 237. 

Wednesday, October 31st. "The Committee to whom was 
referred the petition of a number of the inhabitants of Danby, 
praying the Legislature to take into consideration the situation 
of the Glebe Lands in this State, and to make such regulations 
respecting these lands, as shall secure them to incumbent Parsons, 
whenever they shall settle in the towns where there are such 
lands; and otherwise to regulate the rents and profits of the 
same, where there is no incumbent Parson, made report, That the 
prayer thereof ought not to be granted. Which report was read 
and accepted, and leave granted the petitioners to withdraw their 
petition." 

" The Committee to whom was referred the Petition of a number 
of the inhabitants of Tinmouth, praying the Legislature to regu- 
late the proceedings relating to the Glebe Lands, similar to the 
preceding petition of the ikihabitants of Danby, made report. 
That the prayer thereof ought not to be granted. Which report 
was read and accepted, and leave granted the petitioners to with- 
draw their petition." Journal, 1804, pp. 240, 241. 



1805. 

Arlington, Sept. 25th, 1805. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met agreeable to appointment. 

The Kev. Barzillai Bulkely read prayers, and the Eev. 
Abraham Bronson delivered a Sermon. 

After Divine Service, the Convention was opened and the 
following gentlemen were found Members, viz. 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
The Rev. Barzillai Bulkely. 



96 JOUBJfJ.L-1805. 

ARLINGTON : 

Zadock Hakd, Esq., Mr. Noble Hard, 

Tyeus Hurd, Esq., Mr. Daniel Turner. 

MANCHESTER : 

Truman Squier, Esq., Mr. Jabez Hawlet, 

Mr. Martin Kobberts, Mr. Anson J. Sperry. 

SANDGATE : 

George Peck, Esq., Dr. John Watkins. 

PAWLET: 
Mr. JosiAH Smith. 

FAIRFIELD: 

Mr. Nathan Lobdell. 

The Kev. Mr. Bulkely was chosen President, pro tern, 
and the Piev. Mr. Bronson, Secretary. 

The Convention took into consideration the present state 
of the Lands in Vermont, originally granted to the Vener- 
able Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts. 

After reading a Kesolution of that Society, dated May 
20th, 1785, expressive of their intention to dispose of their 
property in this country to the use of the Church here, the 
Convention adjourned for an hour and a half. 

3 o'clock, P. M. The Convention met and proceeded to 
business. 

Resolved, That Caleb Dayton be requested to sit as a 
Member of this Convention during the remainder of its Ses- 
sion. 

Eesolved, That the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden be the Pres- 
ident of this Convention for the ensuing year. 

Resolved, That the Standing Committee be directed to 
take measures to procure from the Venerable Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, a Deed, or 
other conveyance of the Lands, originally granted to that 
Society in this State, to be applied to the use of the Church 



JOJJBKAL-1805. 97 

here, in such way and manner as the Venerable Society 
shall think proper, (a) 

Kesolved, That the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, Daniel Chipman, Esq., Truman Squier, 
Esq., Mr. Martin Robberts and Mr. Anson J. Sperry be the 
Standing Committee for the ensuing year. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of this Convention do write 
to the Bishop of New- York, signifying our wish to be 
annexed to his Diocese, and requesting him to give us an 
answer upon this subject. 

Resolved, That it be recommended to the people of this 
Church to raise money by subscription or otherwise, for the 
purpose of obtaining possession of the Glebe Lands, and 
securing them to the various Churches, upon such terms as 
shall be agreed on between the said subscribers and the peo- 
ple to whom the Glebes contended for legally and rightfully 
belong, (b) 

Resolved, That the next Meeting of the Convention of 
this Church be held at Manchester, unless the Standing 
Committee shall deem it expedient to appoint it at some 
other place. 

Adjourned. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



(a.) As an explanation of the course of action pursued under 
the authority of this Resolution, the following passage from one 
of the Historical Letters of the Rev. Mr. Bronson is here apt. 

" At my first settlement in the State, my mind was led to an 
investigation of this subject ; and Mi\ Anson J. Sperry, then a 
student at Law in Manchester, engaging with me in the cause, we 
soon became entirely satisfied that the Society's Title remained 
good. Accordingly we brought the subject before the State Con- 
vention in 1805, and obtained the passage of a Resolution direct- 
ing the Standing Committee to take measures for procuring a 
conveyance. At the same time another Resolution was passed, 



98 JO URJfAL-1805. 

requesting tlie Bishop of New York to take us under his superin- 
tendence, that thus having a name among our brethren abroad, 
we might apply to the Society with more confidence of success. 
Having learnt that our people iu New-Hampshire, in the case of 
lands in a similar situation, had procured a Deed of Trust to cer- 
tain individuals, we adopted the same course, and determined to 
ask for a similar conveyance. In order to strengthen our influence, 
Mr. Sperry took a journey to New York and Connecticut, and 
explained our views to Bishop Moore, Dr. Bowden, Dr. Johnson, 
Dr. Hubbard, and the Rev. Ashbel Baldwin, whom we proposed as 
suitable persons to receive the Trust. They all approved of our 
course, and consented to accept the Deed. So much labor was 
necessary in collecting information and making arrangements, 
that the petition, and explanatory letter, and form of a Deed, 
were not ready till July, 1806. They were then transmitted to 
Bishop Moore, and by him forwarded to London. As no answer 
was received from England, at the close of the next year, I wrote 
to Gen. Bradley, Senator in Congress, from Vermont, requesting 
him to inquire of the British Minister, recently arrived in Wash- 
ington, respecting the matter. He wrote me in his characteristic 
style, ' that it was not probable that a man brought up in a cor- 
rupt Court had any more knowledge of the Messiah's Kingdom 
than the Tartars in Asia,' and so he had forwarded the letter to 
Gen. Lyman, our Consul in London, with a desire that he would 
inquire into the subject. A few months after, Gen. Lyman wrote 
us that he had begun an inquiry, and would pursue it, so as to 
ascertain whether our object could be effected. But we never 
received any further communication from him." Gambier Observ- 
er, November 7, 1834. Episcopal Recorder, February 28, 1835. 
(b.) One whose mind is unbiased, and imbued with the great 
principles of right and justice, reads this Resolution with a senti- 
ment of sadness. The valuable property to which it refers, during 
the Session of the Legislature, in the Fall following this Conven- 
tion, was, by legal enactment, in defiance of the decision of the 
United States Court for the district of Vermont, and in viola- 
tion of the sixth article of the Treaty of 1783, taken from the 
Episcopal Chnrch and appropriated to the use and benefit of dis- 
trict schools. And this law, sustained by a qualified decision of 



JOTJBKAL-1805. 99 

the Supreme Court of the United States, has thus far continued 
in force. 

It may well be a source of some gratification to the members 
of the Episcopal Church, however, that the income of this part 
of their inherited and rightful domain, is used with some degree 
of fidelity and success for so good a purpose as the benefit of the 
young. It may not generally be known and considered that, in 
this State, more than Tliree Thousand Dollars, besides an equal 
share of taxation, is annually taken from the Church for the sup- 
port of Common Schools. Here is a great wrong. The State 
has no right to take what every man who can read and under- 
stand the English Language knows to be the property of good 
and loyal citizens, given them for the use and support of Religion, 
on the strength of a legal quibble and refinement, and appropri- 
ate it to any purpose. 

When regard is had to the final vote sequestering and appro- 
priating the Glebe Lands, it is agreeable to see the names of so 
many gentlemen who were govei-ned by just and right principles. 
And, for those familiar with the history of this State, the other 
List affords abundant information in respect to the parties by 
whom this wrong was done. 

The General Assembly of Vermont held its Session in 1805, at 
Danville. What was done in it respecting the Glebe Lands has 
been transcribed from the Journal. 

October 11th, a Committee of five members on the part of the 
House was appointed, to join such Committee as the Governor 
and Council might appoint, to take into consideration the situa- 
tion of the Glebe Lands in this State. 

Members appointed, Mess-rs Benjamin Gardener, Pownal; Phin- 
eas Williams, Bridgwater ; Enoch Emmerson, Rochester ; Ralph 
Parker, Glover; Joseph Perry, Pomfret. Journal, 1805, p. 10. 

"The Committee appointed to take into consideration the 
Glebe Lands in this State, and to whom were referred several 
petitions on that subject, reported a Bill, entitled An Act direct- 
ing the disposal of the Glebe Lands in this State." 

The report was accepted, and the Bill was read and ordered to 
pass to a second reading to-morrow afternoon. Friday October 
25. Journal, 1805, p. 94. 



100 JO UBJfAL-1805. 

Wecluesday, October 30th. " The Bill, entitled an Act direct- 
ing the disposal of the Glebe Lands in the several towns in this 
State, granted under the authority of the Governor of New- 
Hampshire, was taken up and read." 

" Mr. Lewis R. Morris, of Springfield, moved to amend the Bill 
by striking out the word right in the first section of the Bill ; 
which would leave the Bill without expressing the opinion of the 
House on the right of the property of the Glebe Lands. After 
some time spent in debate on the subject, on motion the House 
adjourned." 

In the afternoon of the same day, " The Bill entitled an Act 
directing the disposal of the Glebe Lands, etc., was called up ; 
and the question being put on the adoption of the amendment 
proposed by Mr. Morris, the yeas and nays were demanded by 
Mr. Cameron and were " — Yeas, 48 : Nays, 128. '' So the amend- 
ment was lost." 

"The Bill was then on motion, referred to a Committee of three 
for redrafting. Members chosen, Messrs. Charles Rich, Shoreham ; 
John White, Jr. Georgia; Samuel Shaw, Castleton." Journal, 
1805, pp. 118, 119. 

Friday, Nov. 1. "The Committee to whom was committed 
the Bill entitled, an Act directing the disposal of the Glebe 
Lands in this State, etc., reported the Bill drafted anew. The 
Bill passed the first reading, and was ordered to lie on the table, 
and be made the order of the day at the opening of the House 
to-morrow afternoon, for a second reading." Journal, 1805, p. 129. 

Saturday, Nov. 2d. " Agreeable to the order of the day, the 
Bill entitled an Act for the disposition of Glebe Lands, etc., was 
taken up, and being read the second time, the question was put, 
Shall the Bill pass ? — The yeas and nays, being demanded by Mr. 
Morris, were as follows : 

Yeas : Messrs. John Aiken, Windham ; John H. Andrus, Dan- 
by; Joseph Armington, Waterford; Joel Brownson, Richmond ; 
John Borden, Vineyard ; William Barney, Underbill ; Paul W. 
Brigham, Sharon ; Esaias Butts, Hancock ; Reuben Bigelow, Peru ; 
Aaron Beach, Whiting; Thomas Bartlett, Burke; Jedediah 
Boynton, Shelburn; Daniel Brown, Plymouth; Samuel Collins, 
Dorset; Asahel Chamberlin, Strafford; Ithiel Cargill, Brunswick ; 



JOVEKAL-1805. 101 

Salvin Collins, Berlin ; Penuel Child, Brandon ; Cephas Carpen- 
ter, Moretovvn ; John Cameron, Ryegate ; Sherman Dewey, Hart- 
ford ; Rowland Belong, Lincoln ; Daniel Dyer, Clarendon ; 

Dana, ; Pascal P. Enos, Windsor ; Isaac Eddy, Pittsfield ; 

John Fitch, Huntington; Austin Fenn, Ludlow; Jonathan Fisk, 
Williamstown ; Nathaniel Farrington, Walden ; Elisha Fuller, 
New-Haven ; Thomas Freeman, Barnard ; David Goodwillie, 
Barnet; Edmund Graves, Sunderland; Jacob Galusha, Shafts- 
bury ; Benj. Gardner, Pownal ; Robert Holier, Bristol ; David 
Hazelton, Westford ; Jesse Heath, Groton; Richard Hurd, Sand- 
gate; David Holden, Shrewsbury; Simeon Hine, Colchester; 
John Ide, Jr., Coventry; Samuel Jewett, Weybridge; Daniel 
Jewett, Putney ; John Jackson, Milton ; Elias Jones, Reading ; 
Nathaniel King, Tunbridge ; Lyman Kidder, Braintree ; Robert 
Kennedy, Richford ; Elihu Luce, Hartland ; Asa Lyon, South- 
Hero ; Caleb Leach, Irasburgh ; H. E. G. McLaughlin, Topsham ; 
Nathan Page, Royalton ; Seth Putnam, Middlesex ; Joseph Perry, 
Pomfret; Abijah Perry, Leicester; Nehemiah Perkins, Stowe ; 
Silas Pond, Panton , John Pinneo, Bolton ; Amos Robbiuson, 
Northfield ; Josiah Rising, Rupert ; Ephraim Ranney, Westmin- 
ster; Joseph Robbinson, Swanton; Alvin Simons, Weston; Lewis 
Sowles, Alburgh; Lemuel Scott, Fletcher; Samuel Strong, Ver- 
gennes; Pliny Smith, Orwell ; Samuel Shaw, Castleton; Gideon 
Seegar, Addison ; Daniel Smith, Monkton ; James Smith, Caven- 
dish ; Thomas Taylor, Wolcott ; Gideon Tabor, Mount-Tabor ; 
Simeon Tubbs, Essex; Elisha Thayer, Farlee; Cyrus Ware, 
Montpelier; Pres West, St. Johnsbury ; Nathaniel Wheatly, 
Brookfield ; Phineas Williams, Bridgwater ; Elisha Walker, Hub- 
bardton; John White, Jr., Georgia; Shubael Wilmarth, Stam- 
ford; George Westgate, Johnson; Solomon Walbridge, Cam- 
bridge ; Asa Wilkins, Fairfax ; Joseph Warner, Sudbury. — 95. 

Nays: Messrs. Samuel Arnold, Londonderry; Darius Bulloch, 
Halifax ; Peirce Burton, Norwich ; Jonathan Baker, Arlington ; 
Jonas Brigham, Bakersfield; J. P. Buckingham, Thetford; Asa 
Beebe, Jr., Winhall; Anthony Burgess, Westfield ; Joshua Clapp, 
Montgomery; William Gaboon, Lyndon; Nathaniel Collins, 
Manchester; Isaac Cutler, Fairhaven ; John Cowee, Chittenden ; 
Dudley Chase, Randolph; Samuel C. Crafts, Craftsbury; John 



102 JOUnKAL-1805. 

Dj'er, Townshend; Benjamin Davis, Duxbury; Gilbert Dennison, 
Guilford ; Enoch Emerson, Rochester ; Samuel French, Hard- 
wick; John Frasier, Ferrisburg; Caleb Fisk, Billy mead ; Jere- 
miah French, Williston; William Fox, Wallingford; Jabez 
Foster, Whitingham ; John Fuller, Sherburne ; Simon. Francis, 
Wells ; Arad Hunt, Vernon ; Asa Hemmenway, Bridport ; Nathan 
Hutchins, North-Hero ; Samuel Hubbard, Huntsburgh ; Theophi- 
lus Huntington, Chelsea; Timothy Hinman, Derby; Luke 
Knowlton, Jr., Newfane; Elijah Knight, Rockingham; George 
Kennan, Waterbury ; Xathan Leavenworth, Hinesburgh; Lewis 
R. Morris, Springfield ; Benjamin Muzzy, Jamaca ; Nehemiah 
Noble, Bethel ; Bissel Phelps, Waitsfield ; Seth Pomeroy, St. 
Albans ; Gamaliel Painter, Middlebury ; Samuel Phelps, Lunen- 
burgh ; Ezekiel Porter, Rutland ; Thomas Porter, Vershire ; 
Samuel Porter, Dummerston ; Daniel Reed, Wardsborough ; 
Thomas D. Rood, Jericho; David Rising, Orange; Charles Rich, 
Shoreham; Stephen Royce, Berkshire; Aaron Leland, Chester* 
Speaker of the House ; Reuben Saxton, Salisbury ; Arad Steb- 
bins, Bradford ; Gregory Stone, Weathersfield ; James Shafter, 
Athens ; Benjamin Sandford, Cornwall ; Christopher Sargeant, 
Danville; Matthew Sax, Highgate ; Joshua Tenney, Corinth; Dan- 
iel Tuthill, Landgrove ; LemuelWhitney, Brattleborough. — 63. 

" So the Bill passed, and was directed to be engrossed and sent 
to the Governor and Council for revision and concurrence, or 
proposals of amendment." Journal, 1805, pp. 137, 138. 

Tuesday, November 5. A Bill entitled an Act directing the 
appropriation of the lands in this State, heretofore granted by the 
Government of Great Britain, to the Church of England, as by 
Law established, was returned to the House from the Governor 
and Council by their Secretary, concurred and passed into a Law. 
Journal, 1805, p. 158. 

Of the Act above described, the following is a copy. 

" Whereas the several Glebe Rights, granted by the British 
Government, to the Church of England, as by their Law estab- 
lished, are in the nature of public reservations ; and as such be- 
came vested, by the Revolution, in the sovereignty of this State ; 
therefore. 

Sect. 1. It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the 



JOVRKAL-1806. 103 

State of Vermont, That the several rights of land in this State, 
granted under authority of the British Government, to the Church 
of England, as by law established, be, and the same hereby are, 
granted, severally, to the respective towns in which such lands 
lie, and to their respective use and uses, forever, in the manner 
following, to wit : it shall be the duty of the selectmen, in the 
respective towns, in the name and behalf, and at the expense, of 
such towns, if necessary, to sue for, and recover, the possession of 
such lands, and the same to lease out, according to their best 
judgment and discretion, reserving an annual rent therefor, which 
shall be paid into the treasury of such town, and appropriated to 
the use of schools therein ; and shall be applied in the same man- 
ner as monies arising from school lands, are, by law, directed to 
be applied. 

Sect. 2. That whenever any town, containing a Glebe Right, 
shall have been divided, and any part thereof set off to any other 
town or towns, the inhabitants residing in such part or parts set 
off, shall be entitled to their full proportion, and no more, of the 
monies arising from the Glebe Lands in the town to which they 
originally belonged." Laws of Vermont, compiled by William 
Slade, jun,, p. 198. 



1806. 

Manchester, Sept. 24, 1806. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met according to appointment. The 
Rev. Abraham Bronson read prayers, and the Rev. Russel 
Catlin delivered a Sermon. 

Immediately after the Religious Exercises, the Conven- 
tion was opened, when the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden was 
chosen President, and the Rev. Mr. Bronson, Secretary. 

The following gentlemen were found to be present as 
Delegates to this Convention, viz. 

MANCHESTER : 
Truman Squier, Esq., Mr. Martin Robberts, 

Mr. Joshua French, Anson J. Sperry, Esq. 



104 JOVEKAL-1806. 

ARLINGTON : 

Mr. Curtis Hawley, Mr. Noble Hard, 

Luther Stone, Esq., Mr. Daniel Turner. 

PAWLET: 

Mr. JosiAH Smith, Mr. Asaph Teele. 

CASTLETON : 

Mr. John Whitlock. 

DORSET : 
Mr. John French. 

Mr. Caleb Dayton and Job Giddings, Esq. were requested 
to sit as members of this Convention. 
Adjourned for an hour and a half. 

Four o'clock, P. M. 
The Convention met. 

Anson J. Sperry, Esq., one of the Standing Committee, 

reported verbally, That he was the bearer of a letter of 

the Secretary of this Convention to the Bishop of New- York, 
requesting him to take the Church in this State under his 
Episcopal care, agreeable to a Resolution of the Convention, 
and that the Bishop authorized him to inform this Conven- 
tion, that he would comply with said request, (a) 

Mr. Sperry, also, read a copy of the writings addressed by 
the Standing Committee to " The Incorporated Society for 
propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts," requesting a con- 
veyance of their Lands in this State for the use of the 
Church here. These writings consisted of a Petition and 
an accompanying Letter, with the form of a Deed, which 
had been transmitted to the said Society. The Gentlemen 
named in the Deed, as Trustees, to the Lands, were, the 
Bishop of New- York, the Bishop of Connecticut, William 
Samuel Johnson, Esq., LL. D., Jonathan Ingersoll, Esq., 
John Bowden, D. D., Bela Hubbard, D. D. and the Rev. 
Ashbel Baldwin. 

Whereupon it was resolved, That this Convention do ap- 
prove of the measures taken by the Standing Committee for 



JOURMAL-1807. 105 

obtaining a Deed of the Society's Lands, and do direct the 
Standing Committee for the ensuing year to pursue the said 
measures to effect. 

Kesolved, That the Eev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev, 
Russel Catlin, the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Daniel Chip- 
man, Esq., Truman Squier, Esq., Anson J. Sperry, and Mr. 
Martin Eobberts, be the Standing Committee for the year 
ensuing. 

Resolved, That the next Meeting of this Convention be 
at Hartland on the third Wednesday of September next. 

Adjourned. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



(a) " In the Convention of 1805, when the Petition was ordered 
to England for the Society's Lands, a resolution was passed re- 
questing Bishop Moore of New-York to take the Church in Ver- 
mont imder his care. He consented with a view of giving more 
efficacy to that Petition, but with the express understanding, that 
he should not be expected to visit the State. In this situation as 
regards the Episcopate the Church remained till 1809." Bron- 
son's Letters. Gambier Observer, Nov. 21, 1834. Episcopal 
Recorder, Mar. 7, 1835. 



1807. 

Hartland, Sept. 16, 1807. 
Agreeably to appointment, the Convention of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont met ; but 
only a few members being present, no business was done. 
The Convention adjourned to meet at Rutland on Wednes- 
day, October 7th. 



106 JOUBJfAL-1807. 

Rutland, October 7th, 1807. 

According to adjournment the Convention of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont met at the 
House of Darius Chipman, Esq., of Rutland. 

The following gentlemen were present as Members, viz. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson. 

EUTLAND : 

' Darius Chipman, Esq. 

MIDDLEBURY: 
Daniel Chipman, Esq, 

CASTLETON: 

Mr. John Whitlock. 

FAIRFIELD: 

Mr. Nathan Lobdell. 

WELLS : 
David Lewis, Esq., Mr. Williams. 

MANCHESTER : 

Anson J. Sperry, Esq. 

ARLINGTON: 

Mr. Noble Hard. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden was chosen President, and 
the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Secretary. 

The Rev. Mr. Chittenden, the Rev. Mr. Bronson, Darius 
Chipman, Esq., Daniel Chipman, Esq., David Lewis, Esq., 
Anson J. Sperry, Esq., and Mr. Martin Robberts were 
chosen the Standing Committee. 

A Copy of the Petition and other papers forwarded to 
" the Venerable Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts," for the purpose of obtaining a Deed of 
their Lands in this State, were read ; and the Committee 
reported, that they had as yet received no answer to said 
Petition, and had taken no measures upon the subject with- 
in the year past. 



JOTJRKAL-1808. 107 

Whereupon it was resolved, by the Convention, That the 
Standing Committee be, and they are hereby directed, to 
pursue the measures ah-eady taken to obtain a Deed of the 
Society's Lands in this State. 

The next Convention of the Church was appointed to be 
held at Shelburne on the fourth Wednesday of September 
next. 

Adjourned. ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



1808. 

Shelbuene, Sept. 23d, 1808. 
Agreeable to appointment the Convention of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont met. The 
following gentlemen were present as Members, viz. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson. 
SHELBURNE -. 

Bethuel Chittenden, 2d, Simeon Palmer. 

SALISBURY: 

Stephen Hard, Esq. 

CHARLOTTE: 

Zacheus Towner, Esq. 

BURLINGTON: 

Ambrose Atwater. 

ESSEX : 

Dr. John Perigo. 

WILLISTON: 

Daniel Goodrich. 

CASTLETON : 

John Whitlock. 

WESTHAVEN: 

Gilbert Hard. 

FAIRFIELD: ' 

Ezekiel Bradley, 2d. ' 

FAIRFAX : 

Abijah Hawley. 



108 JOUR:N'AL~1808. 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden was chosen President and 
the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Secretary. 

The Rev. Mr. Bronson in behalf of the Standing Com- 
mittee made a Report respecting the state of the correspond- 
ence with the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. 
Whereupon it was resolved, That this Convention do ap- 
prove of the measures taken within the year past on that 
subject, and do direct the Standing Committee to take such 
further measures as in their discretion shall appear advis- 
able, (a) 

The Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. Abraham Bron- 
son, Darius Chipman, Esq., Daniel Chipman, Esq., David 
Lewis, Esq., Anson J. Sperry, Esq. and Mr. Martin Rob- 
berts, were appointed the Standing Committee for the year 
ensuing. 

The next Meeting of the Convention was appointed to be 
held at Westhaven on the fourth Wednesday in September 
next. 

Adjourned. ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



(a) The following passage from one of the Rev. Mr. Bronson's 
Historical Letters shows plainly the steadiness of aim and wisdom 
with which this interest of the Church was pursued. 

" In the Autumn of 1808. I made a journey to Canada, and 
opened the case to Dr. Stewart, then a Member and Missionary of 
the Society, and now Bishop of Quebec. He cheerfully tendered 
us any assistance in his power, and continued a friendly corres- 
pondence, except with some interruption in time of war, till our 
claim was established in 1823. In the same year, 1808, Bishop 
Moore, by our request, again addressed the Society, and the next 
year received for answer, that they could not consistently make 
any conveyance of their property here, till they had further infor- 
mation about it, and about the success of a Power of Attorney 
which they had given for the recovery of their Lands in New- 
Hampshire." Gambier Observer, Nov. 7, 1834. Episcopal 
Recorder, Feb. 28, 1835. 



JOUENAL-1809. 109 

1809. 

Westhaven, Sept. 27th, 1809. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met agreeably to appointment. The 
following gentlemen were present as Members, viz. 
The Eev. Abkaham Bronson. 

CHARLOTTE: 

Zacheus Towner, Esq. 

SHELBURNE: 

Bela Chittenden, Heman Chittenden. 

POULTNEY: 

Ebenezer Canfield, Esq, 

ARLINGTON: 

Curtis Hawley. 

PAWLET: 

JosiAH Smith. 

CASTLETON : 

Timothy Everts. 

WESTIIAVEN : 

Col. J. Orms, Samuel Francis, 

Capt. William Spratt, Gilbert Hard. 

Zacheus Towner, Esq. was chosen President and the Eev. 
Abraham Bronson, Secretary. 

The Constitution and Canons of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the United States were read. 

The Eev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Eev. Abraham Bron- 
son, Darius Chipman, Esq., Daniel Chipman, Esq., David 
Lewis, Esq., Anson J. Sperry, Esq. and Mr. Martin Eob- 
berts were chosen the Standing Committee for the year 
ensuing. 

The further correspondence respecting the Society's Lands 
in this State was read. Whereupon it was resolved, That 
the Standing Committee be, and they are hereby directed to 
take such further measures in that business as they shall 
deem expedient, (a) 



110 JOVBKAL-1809. 

The next Convention of the Church in Vermont was 
appointed to meet at Fairfield on the fourth Wednesday 
in September next. 

Adjourned. ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



(a) " By this time we had discovered tl'iat the Deed in New- 
Hampshire had been of no use, and that the Agents there had 
been obliged to get a Power of Attorney, so as to carry on their 
measures in the Society's name. Even in this way they did not 
fully succeed, till in 1810, the agency was transferred to the Trus- 
tees of the Bishops in Massachusetts, who prosecuted the claim to 
final effect. The same course in the use of a Deed would occur 
in Vermont : so it was determined at the next application to ask 
merely for a Power of Attorney. But the embargo, non-inter- 
course and war intercepted any further correspondence with the 
Society, till the return of peace. In the meantime, however, 
notwithstanding the perplexities of the Glebe Suit, the business 
was not wholly neglected." Rev. A, Bronson, Gambier Observer, 
Nov. 7, 1834. Episcopal Recorder, Feb. 28, 1835. 

The name of the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden appears in the Jour- 
nal of this year for the last time. A simple sketch of his life is 
here fit. A more extended memorial of him may be written. He 
was born in Guilford, Conn, in 1739. He came into Vermont in 
1773 and settled in the town of Tinmouth, Rutland County. He 
was ordained Deacon by Bishop Seabury at Stamford, Conn 
June I, 1787, and Priest by the same at New London, June 20 
1794. In 1790 he removed to Shelburne, Chittenden County. 
Among the few widely dispersed Episcopalians of Vermont, he 
did faithfully during 22 years the work of an Evangelist. From 
1794 to the time of his death, he was a member of the Standing 
Committee, and from 1798 to 1808 the President of the Conven- 
tion. He died at Shelburne Nov. 5, 1809, while engaged in 
Divine service. 



JOVBKAL-1810. Ill 



1810. 



MiDDLEBURY, Augiist 29th, 1810. 

A Special Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the State of Vermont met agreeably to a Call of the 
Standing Committee, 

Adjourned until to-morrow. 

August 80th, 1810. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

The Kev. Daniel Burhans, D. D., of Connecticut, being 
present, was requested to sit as President of the Convention. 

The Kev. Abraham Bronson was chosen Secretary. 

It appearing to the Convention that the old Constitution 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in this State was lost, 
so as not to be found among the papers of the Convention, 
a new one was formed and adopted in the following words, 
to wit : 

" The Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the State of Vermont. 

Art. I. The various Churches in the State of Vermont 
shall be considered as united under one Convention, in sub- 
ordination to the General Convention of the United States. 

Art. II. A Convention of this Church shall be annually 
held on the Fourth Wednesday in June, at such place as 
shall be appointed at a previous Convention, consisting of 
all the Clergy and Lay Delegates from each of the Churches. 

Art. III. The Convention shall deliberate and act in 
one body, but shall vote in distinct orders when any mem- 
ber shall call for such a division on any question ; and in 
such case a concurrence of a majority of both orders shall 
be necessary to give validity to any measure. 

Art. IV, A President, Secretary and a Standing Com- 
mittee shall be chosen at every annual Convention, 

Art, V. No alteration shall be made in this Constitu- 
tion, except in Annual Convention. 



112 JOJJRKAL-1810. 

The Constitution of the Eastern Diocese in the United 
States was read and assented to, in the words following, viz. 

The Constitution of tlie Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Eastern Diocese of the United States of America. 

Art. I. The States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
New-Hampshire and Vermont shall constitute one Episco- 
pal Diocese, in subordination to the General Convention, 
and shall be entitled. The Eastern Diocese of the United 
States. 

Art. II. There shall be biennially held a Convention of 
the Church in this Diocese on the last Wednesday in Sep- 
tember in each of the four States by rotation, composed of 
Clerical and Lay Delegates, chosen by the State Conven- 
tions, each State being entitled to send one or more Dele- 
gates, not exceeding four of each order. 

Art. III. The Convention shall deliberate and act in 
one body, but shall vote in distinct orders, when any Mem- 
ber shall call for such a division on any question ; and in 
such case a concurrence of a majority of both orders shall 
be necessary to give validity to any measure. 

Art. IV. The Bishop, or if no Bishop be present, a 
Clergyman chosen by ballot, shall be President of Conven- 
tion. 

Art. V. At each meeting of the Convention a Secretary 
shall be chosen by ballot, who shall keep a true and fair 
record of the proceedings of Convention, and at the close of 
each session shall furnish the Bishop with a copy of the 
same, or if there be no Bishop, the Standing Committee. 

Art. VI. There shall be a Standing Committee elected 
at each stated Meeting of the Convention, consisting of 
seven persons, one of whom shall be from each State in the 

Diocese. 

Art. VII. Whenever hereafter the Episcopate of this 
Diocese shall be vacant^ the Standing Committee shall give 
information thereof to the Secretary of each State Conven- 
tion in the Diocese, and also of the time and place of a 



JOVRKAL-1810. 113 

Special Convention for the purpose of filling up such vacancy ; 
which Special Convention shall consist of the Clergy belong- 
ing to the Diocese and a Lay Delegate from each of the 
Churches which may have been recognized by the Bishop or 
Standing Committee, and shall be held at least three months 
after such information is given, and in every election of 
Bishop, the Clergy shall make a nomination by ballot, which 
nomination shall be approved by a majority of the Lay Del- 
egates present, before the choice shall be considered valid. 

Art. VIII. Standing rules for the orderly conducting of 
business shall be devised from time to time in biennial Con- 
vention. 

Art. IX. No State shall withdraw from this Diocese 
without the approbation of the House of Bishops. 

Art. X. No alteration shall be made in this Constitu- 
tion, but in biennial Convention, nor unless it has been pro- 
posed in a previous Convention, nor without the concurrence 
of a majority of the Delegation from at least three of the 
States in the Diocese. 

Done in Convention of the Clerical and Lay Delegates of 
the Protestant Episcopal Churches of the Eastern Diocese, 
consisting of the Churches of Massachusetts, Rhode-Island, 
New-Hampshire and Vermont, this thirty-first day of May 
in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and ten. 

The Eev. Abraham Bronson, Mr. John Whitlock, David 
Lewis, Esq., Daniel Chipman, Esq., Anson J. Sperry, Esq., 
Dudley Chase, Esq. and Dr. Edward Campbell, were chosen 
the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Vermont for the 
year ensuing. 

The Eev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Samuel Sewall, 
Horatio Seymour, Esq., Anson J. Sperry, Esq., Dr. Sam- 
uel Cutler and Mr. George Cleveland were chosen Deputies 
to represent this Diocese in the General Convention of the 
United States, to be held at New-Haven on the third Tues- 
day in May next. 



1]4 JOVRKAL-ISIO. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Truman Sqiiier, Esq., Da- 
vid Lewis, Esq., Mr. John Whitlock, and Mr. George Cleve- 
land were chosen Delegates to represent this Diocese in the 
Diocesan Convention to be held in Boston on the last 
Wednesday in September. 

Voted. That the Secretary write to the Convention of the 
Church in Connecticut, requesting that the Clergy in said 
State may enter into some arrangements to make occasional 
visits to the Churches in this quarter. 

Voted, That the next Convention of this Church meet at 
Wells. Adjourned. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



The following extract from the seventh of the Rev. Mr. Bron- 
son's Historical Letters is here appropriate. 

In 1809 " the Convention of Massachusetts directed their 
Secretary to invite their brethren in Rhode-Island, New-Hamp- 
shire and Vermont to join with them in the election of a Bishop. 
The Secretary, having no knowledge of any Churchmen in Ver- 
mont, made no communication to that State ; but the Rev. 
William Montague, whose zeal and diligence did much for the 
cause at that interesting period, made a journey to New-Hamp- 
shire at a very inclement season, and, with the Rev. Mr. Barber, 
came over to Manchester to consult upon the subject. As the 
fund for supporting the Episcopate was expected to be raised 
principally in Massachusetts, the project appeared peculiarly 
favorable, giving encouragement of Episcopal ministrations at a 
small expense to the people. Having then no colleague in the 
State, I could decide the whole question as to the Clergy, — Mr. 
Sperry, then with me, and Mr. Chipman easily consulted by letter, 
the assent of the Standing Committee was soon obtained. The 
next May, Mr. Chipman of Middlebury, Mr. John Whitlock of 
Castleton and Dr. Cutler of Rockingham, and myself, with the 
Deleo-ates from the other States contemplated, attended a Con- 
vention in Boston and formed the Constitution of the Eastern 
Diocese." 



jour:n'al-i8io. 115 

" After the adoption of this Constitution the Convention pro- 
ceeded to the election of a Bishop. A respectable Clergyman in 
New- York, formerly resident in Massachusetts had been named 
for the office; but Dr. Gardner of Boston publicly protested 
against taking a candidate from abroad. He had told Dr. 
Crocker and myself in conversation, that as we could send our 
young men to other States for Orders, he saw no need of any 
Bishop among, ourselves; but if others were anxious, he would 
propose Mr. Griswold of Rhode Island as being for age and cha- 
racter the most suitable candidate. We at once assented to the 
proposal, and communicated to Mr. Barber who cordially approv- 
ed : the Clergy of Massachusetts,- all except one, concurred ; and 
the vote of the Laity was unanimous. Thus providentially 
transpired one of the most important events which has ever 
occurred to the Church in these Eastern States. Mr. Griswold 
at first declined the appointment, but was requested to defer a 
positive decision for the present. At length, by the earnest 
entreaties of his brethren and former associates in Connecticut 
he was induced to accept, and was consecrated in New- York June 
1811. Near the close of the same month he visited Vermont 
attended the State Convention, and administered Confirmation 
at Wells, Manchester and Arlington," Gambler Observer, No- 
vember 21, 1834. Episcopal Recorder, March 7, 1835. 



During this year, 1810, an action of ejectment was brought 
by the town of Pawlet against Daniel Clark and others to re- 
cover possession of the Glebe Lot in that town. At the time 
this suit was commenced Mr. Bronson of Manchester was entitled 
to the rent. The case was decided at Washington in Feb. 1815. 

An adjourned meeting of the Convention of the Eastern Dio- 
cese was holden in Trinity Church, Boston, September 25th 1810. 
To this Convention, the President, the Rev. Dr. Gardiner^com- 
municated the following letter from the Rev. Alexander V. Gris- 
wold, the Bishop elect. 

"Bristol, September, 12, 1810. 
Eeverend and Dear Sir ; 

As the time approaches, when our Convention according to 
adjournment, will again convene, it becomes necessary agreeably 



116 JOUBJfAL-1810. 

to their resolution, that I should communicate to you my deter- 
mination respecting their late election. It will be needless to 
trouble you with observations on my inability and disqualifica- 
tions, which will too soon be known. The Convention were 
pleased to call me to a very sacred and important office, 
which requires the most serious consideration. At first 
indeed there appeared no room for doubt, or hesitation : 
there seemed to be every reason for declining an undertaking so 
arduous, so responsible in its nature, and for the effectual dis- 
charge of which I possessed so few of the requisite qualifications. 
But further reflection suggested thst a call of this serious and 
important nature ought not to be declined any more than complied 
with, without great and mature deliberation ; that we ought not 
to shrink from any duty, to which God is pleased to call us, from 
a conscious inability of doing ourselves honour, in case we can do 
good. Nor is the sacrifice of ease and other temporal comforts, 
necessary to the discharge of this, or any other office in, the 
Church, sufficient excuse to satisfy the minds of those who have 
sincerely engaged in the Gospel Ministry. Having consulted 
with many, whose judgment and advice I have every reason to 
respect, it seems to be their general, if not unanimous voice, that 
the present peculiar state of this Diocese requires my acceptance 
of ye Episcopate; and, however desirable may be a more able and 
worthy candidate, that it is, under existing circumstances, my 
indispensable duty to acqiiiesce. To Him, therefore, who is able 
to make the humblest instruments subservient to the purposes of 
His providence, I yield the result. Should the Convention, who 
have now had time for more mature deliberation, judge it still 
expedient, all circumstances considered, to adhere to what they 
have [done], I shall not refuse any compliance with their wishes. 
Trusting in God, and their candid indulgence and friendly coun- 
sels, I shall devote my future hours to the good and benefit of 
those Churches whom the Lord shall please to put under my care ; 
humbly endeavouring by zeal and diligence to supply what in 
other talents is deficient. With all due respect, 
I am your friend and brother, 

ALEXANDER V. GRISWOLD. 
Reverend John S. J. Gardiner, 

President of the Convention." 



JOURJfAL-1810. 117 

The day following this adjourned meeting, the regular Conven- 
tion of the Eastern Diocese assembled in Trinity Church, Boston. 
The following votes w^ere passed having regard to the foregoing 
letter, the due support and consecration of the Rev. Mr. Griswold 
to the office of Bishop : 

"Voted that Shuhael Bell, the Rev. Wm. Montague, and Benj. 
Gardiner, Esq. be a Committee to wait on the Rev. Alexander V. 
Griswold and express to him that the Convention acknowledge 
with pleasure his acceptance of the Episcopate ; and to assure 
him that they will cordially and faithfully co-operate with him in 
the discharge of his duty ; and that he may receive a satisfactory 
and honourable support, they have chosen a Committee to devise 
ways and means for this purpose ; also that the Convention return 
thanks to the Rev. Mr. Griswold for the excellent discourse deliv- 
ered before them this day, and request a copy for the press." 

"Voted, that the Rev. John S. J. Gardiner, the Rev. Daniel 
Barber, the Rev. Abraham Bronson and the Rev. Nathan B. 
Crocker be a Committee to wait on the Bishop elect, and to pre- 
sent him to the House of Bishops for consecration at the meeting 
of the General Convention in May next." 

The consecration of the Bishop elect took place as contemplat- 
ed in the foregoing vote. The following is a copy of the Letter 
of Consecration : 

" Know all men hy these presents, that we, Wra. White, D. D., 
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of 
Pennsylvania, presiding Bishop, Samuel Provoost, D. D., Bishop 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of New-York, 
and Abraham Jarvis, D. D., Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the State of Connecticut, under the protection of Al- 
mighty God, in Trinity Church in the City of New-York, on 
Wednesday the twenty-ninth day of May, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and eleven, did then and there 
rightly and canonically consecrate our beloved in Christ, Alex- 
ander Viets Griswold, Rector of St. Michael's Church, Bristol, 
Rhode Island, of whose sufficiency in good learning, soundness 
in the faith and purity of manners, we were fully ascertained, 
into the office of Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Eastern Diocese, composed of the States of Massachusetts 



118 JOURJfAL-1811. 

Rhode Island, New-Hampshire and Vermont, to which he hath 
been elected by the Convention of said States. 

Given in the City of New York this twenty-ninth day of May 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eleven. 

WILLIAM WHITE, 
SAMUEL PROVOOST, 
ABRAHAM JARVIS." 
The foregoing documents and votes were copied from the 
Original Manuscript Records of the Eastern Diocese, in the 
archives of the Church in Massachusetts. 



1811. 

Wells, June 26, 1811. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Vermont met agreeably to appointment. 
The following gentlemen vs^ere present as Members, viz. 
The Rt. Rev. Alexander V. Griswold, Bishop of the 

Eastern Diocese of the United States. 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
The Rev. Parker Adams. 

MANCHESTER : 

Mr. Joshua French. 

PAWLET : 

Mr. JosiAH Smith. 

WELLS : 

David Lewis, Esq. 

CASTLETON: 
Mr. John Whitlock, 

WESTHAVEN : 
Mr. Gilbert Hard. 

MIDDLEBURY: 

Joel Doolittle, Esq. 

POULTNEY : 

Mr. Z. Lewis. 



JOUBJfAL-1811. 119 

The Kt. Kev. the Bishop was requested to sit as Presi- 
dent of the Convention. 

The Rev, Mr. Bronson was chosen Secretary. 
Adjourned to half past 3 o'clock. 

Half past 3 o'clock. 
The Convention met. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Parker Adams, 
Daniel Chipman, Esq., Dudley Chase, Esq. and Anson J. 
Sperry, Esq., were chosen the Standing Committee for the 
year ensuing. 

Resolved, That the Standing Committee be and they are 
hereby authorized, in behalf of this. Convention, to concur 
with the Board of Trustees of Donations in Boston in such 
mode of conveyance of the Lands of the Propagation Society 
in this State, as said Board shall deem proper."* 

The Rev. Mr. Bronson presented the form of a Canon, 
directing the mode of trying Clergymen accused of misde- 
meanor, which was adopted, (a) 

The Rev. Mr. Adams presented the form of Canon, 
pointing out the mode of forming Churches, which was 
adopted, (b) 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Adams, Resolved, That the 
thanks of this Convention be presented to the Rt. Rev. the 
Bishop for his assistance as President of this Convention, 

* This Board was incorporated by the Legislature of Massachusetts 
in 1810, under the name of " The Tru.stees of Donations to the Episcopal 
Church." 

"At the origin of the Society, about five thousand seven hundred dollars 
were raised, forming the Bishop's Fund ; the interest of which, together 
with the yearly subscription of nearly eighty members from various parts 
of the Diocese, was to be appropriated to the Bishoji." "A further design 
of the incorporation is, to recover from loss, and to protect for the benefit 
of various particular churches throughout the Diocese, a vast landed prop- 
erty, the benefit of which, several Churches are now enjoying ; and there 
is a reasonable prospect, that, in a few years, many others will realize sim- 
ilar advantages.. To these objects the Society have given constant and 
unwearied exertion." Gospel Advocate, vol. ui, p, 33. 



120 JOURNAL-lSll. 

and likewise for his Sermon this day delivered before the 
Convention, requesting a copy of the same for the press. 

The Secretary was directed to present the foregoing Res- 
olution and Request to the Bishop which was done by him 
accordingly. 

Voted, Thtit the next Convention of this Church be held 
at Middlebury. 

Adjourned, sine die. 



PAROCHIAL REPORTS. 

The Rev. Parker Adams for the seven months last past report- 
ed as follows : 

Vergennes : Baptisms — children, 5. Middlebury : Baptisms — 
children, 10. Charlotte : Baptisms — children, 4. Abroad : Bap- 
tisms — children 7, adult 1. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson for the past year reported as 
follows : 

Arlington: Baptisms — adult 1, children 4. Manchester: Bap- 
tisms — adult 1, children 4. Abroad: Baptisms — children, 2. 

Marriages at Arlington, 2 ; Communicants, 44. Communicants 
at Manchester, 13. 

CAXONS 
Passed by the Convention, June 26th, 1811. 

(a) Canon I. Of the mode of trying Clergymen accused of 
misdemeanor. 

Whenever any Clergyman of this Church shall be accused of 
infidelity, heresy, vice or irregularity of any kind, the accuser or 
accusers shall transmit a copy of the charge, signed by him or 
them, to the Standing Committee; and if they shall deem it wor- 
thy of notice, they shall report thereupon to the Bishop, who may 
summon a council of his Clergy, not less than three, — a copy of 
the charge and due notice of the time and place of trial being 



JOVRKAL-1811. 121 

likewise communicated to the party accused, — and after a full and 
fair investigation of the subject, the Bishop may pronounce sen- 
tence in the case. If any minister degraded by this Canon, shall 
consider himself agrieved, he shall be allowed an appeal to the 
House of Bishops. 

(b) Canon II. Of the manner of forming Churches. 

As it is deemed impracticable at present to fix boundaries to 
the several cures that may be formed in this State, and as it is 
important to be entitled to the privileges of incorporated relig- 
ious societies in this State, each Church hereafter to be formed 
shall, agreeably to the law of this State, form themselves on the 
following plan. A Minister, with the advice of the Clergy in 
regular standing in this State, shall give notice in time of public 
service to the Episcopalians of any town two weeks previous to 
the time of Meeting. At which meeting shall be chosen by bal- 
lot or otherwise, two Wardens, and three or more Vestrymen, to 
hold office until their successors are chosen, which may be done 
annually. The accession of members at the first meeting shall 
be by subscribing a written instrument expressive of their inten- 
tion to join. Njp person that has subscribed said instrument shall 
be exempt from any regulations or restrictions of said Society till 
he shall have presented to the Wardens, or Clerk of said Society, 
a certificate in writing, that he wishes no longer to be considered 
a member of said society. Any Society thus formed, with an 
appropriate name, shall be considered in union with the Church 
in this State, and shall be entitled to a delegation to the State 
Convention. Any number of Episcopalians may, without the 
presence or direction of. a Clergyman, form themselves into a 
Society, and submit their proceedings to the Convention, and, if 
no objections appear, shall be admitted into union. 



"At th-e General Convention in 1811, by the assistance of the 
Hon. Rufas King of New- York, a Hesolution passed the lower 
House, requesting the presiding Bishop to address a letter to the 
Society in our behalf. Much other preparation was also made for 
a vigorous application, as soon as a friendly intercourse should 
be opened between the two countries. This took place, as is well 



122 JOVEKAL-lSn. 

known, in the beginning of 1815." Mr. Bronson's Letters. 
Gambier Observer, Kov. 7, 183-4. Episcojoal Recorder, Feb. 
28, 1835. 

While these steps were taken in this country in regard to the 
Propagation Rights, the Society in England, on account of the 
various applications and representations made to them, were 
giving the subject of their property in this State more definite 
and serious consideration. 

" At a meeting of the Society on the 16th of November 1810, 
the Secretary of the Society was directed to obtain the fullest and 
most particular information respecting the nature and value of 
the rights of the Society to the lands in Vermont, with the best 
means of recovering and rendering the same available." Peters' 
Reports, vol. iv, p. 483. 



1812. 

MiDDLEBURY, June 24th, 1812. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met pursuant to constitutional ap- 
pointment. Present, 

The Rev. Parker Adams, 
The Rev. Stephen Jewett. 

WELLS : 

David Lewis, Esq. 

CASTLETON : 

John Whitlock. 

VERGENNES: 
Ezra Perry. 

FAIRFIELD: 

Bradley Barlow. 

Stephen Hard, Daniel Chipman, Horatio Seymour, 
George Cleveland and Joel Doolittle were requested to take 
seats in the Convention. 



JOUR.YAL-1812. 123 

The Convention being assembled, the Rev. Parker Ad- 
ams was chosen President and Joel Doolittle, Secretary. 

The Rev, Parker Adams, the Rev. Abraham Bronson, the 
Rev. Stephen Jewett, Anson J. Sperry, Daniel Chipman, 
Ezra Perry and Horatio Seymour were duly chosen a Stand- 
ing Committee for the year ensuing. 

The Rev. Parker Adams, the Rev. Stephen Jewett, the 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Anson J. Sperry, Abijah Williams 
and Francis Bradbury were duly chosen Delegates from the 
Diocese of Vermont to the Convention of the Eastern Dio- 
cese to be holden at Providence, R. I., in September next. 

The Rev. Dr. John Kewley was duly appointed to preach 
a Sermon at the next annual Convention in this Diocese, 
and the Rev. Parker Adams, in case Dr. Kewley should fail 
to be present, was appointed his Substitute. 

Pursuant to the 45th Canon of the General Convention 
the Parochial Reports were called for and read as follows : 

St. Paul's Church, Vergennes : Baptisms — adults 2, children 
9 ; Funerals 10 ; Marriage 1 ; Communicants, 16. 

The First Episcopal Society of Addison Coianty, Middlelury : 
Baptisms — adult, 1, infant, 1- Communicants, 10. The Rev. 
Parker Adams, officiating Minister in both places. 

In Paiolet, Wells, and other neighboring towns in Vermont: 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants, 19; Funerals, 5; Marriages, 2. 

S. Jewett, Minister. 
Pawlet, June 22, 1812. • 

Resolved by the Convention, That the several Churches 
in Union with the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State 
of Vermont, be requested to raise by contribution or other- 
wise such sum or sums of money as they may think proper 
to be transmitted by their respective Delegates, to the An- 
nual Convention, to be appropriated in such way as said 
Convention may deem expedient. 

Convention adjourned. 

Attest, JOEL DOOLITTLE, Secretary. 



124 JOVBKAL-1812. 

September 30, 1812, the Biennial Convention of the Eastern 
Diocese met in Providence, R. I. The Rev, Parker Adams was 
the only delegate present from Vermont. 

Bishop Griswold made the following statement rsspecting his 
official acts and the condition of the Diocese : 
" Respected Breturen, 

THE Clerical and Lay Delegates of this Convention : — 

I now for the first time meet you since my appointment to the 
Episcopal jurisdiction in this Diocese ; and the 45th Canon of 
the General Convention makes it my duty on this occasion to lay 
before you the situation of our Churches and the official duties 
which I haive performed. With very few exceptions, I have vis- 
ited the Churches of this Diocese once, and some of them a sec- 
ond time, and the present appearances are, that most of them are 
increasing in numbers and piety, and attentive to the doctrines 
and discipline of the Church. In these visitations I have admin- 
istered the holy rite of Confirmation to 1212 persons, and have 
veiy generally and with much satisfaction witnessed the appear- 
ance of great sincerity and devotion in those who received it. 
St. John's Church in Providence and St. Andrew's Church, in 
Hanover, Massachusetts, have been consecrated to the service of 
God. Messrs Chever Felch, Walter Cranstom, John P. K. Hen- 
shaw and Evan M. Johnson have been admitted as Candidates' 
for Holy Orders. The Rev. Aaron Humphrey has been ordained 
to the holy order of Deacons. The Rev. Parker Adams and the 
Rev. Cliarles Burroughs, deacons, have been ordained Presbyters. 
Mr. Humphrey officiates at Gardner, in the District of Maine; Mr. 
Adams in the Churches at Middlebury and Vergennes, in Ver- 
mont. The Rev. Stephen Jewett, Deacon, officiates one half of 
the time at Pawlet and Wells in the last mentioned State. The 
Rev. Joab G. Cooper from the State of New- York has been insti- 
tuted in the Church at Hanover, Mass. and Mr. Burroughs in the 
Church at Portsmouth. 

To this statement, Brethren, I have only to add my prayers 
that the Lord will inspire us with wisdom, unity and zeal, and 
that He will direct our counsels and prosper our labors to the ad- 
vancement of His glory and ye prosperity of his people. 

ALEXANDER V. GRISWOLD." 



J0UBJ^J.L~1813. 125 

The foregoing Address was copied from the Records of the 
Eastern Diocese before referred to. 



1813. 

MiDDLEBURY, Juue 23J, 1813. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met pursuant to constitutional ap- 
pointment, and on motion, adjourned to the 24th inst. at 
two o'clock, P. M. 

June 24th, 1813. 
The Convention met pursuant to adjournment. Present 
from abroad. 

The Bev. Simon Wilmer, of Neio Jersey. 
The Rev. Mr. Humphrey, of 3IassachuseUs. 
The Hon. Daniel Chipman was chosen President and Joel 
Doolittle, Secretary. 

The following persons were duly chosen as the Standing 
Committee for this Diocese, for the year ensuing, viz. the 
Eev. Parker Adams, the Eev. Abraham Bronson, Anson 
J. Sperry, Esq., Daniel Chipman, Esq. and Horatio Sey- 
mour, Esq. 

The following persons were duly chosen as Deputies to the 
General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the United States, viz. 

Clerical. 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, The Rev. J. P. K. Henshaw. 
The Rev. Parker Adams, 

Lay. 
Truman Squier, Esq., Hon. Horatio Seymour, 

Jonathan Baker, Esq., Col. Bradley Barlow, 

Sylvester Deming, Esq., Nathan Lob dell, 

Anson J. Sperry, Esq., Daniel Henshaw. 

Joel Doolittle, Esq., 



126 JOURMAL-ISU. 

Voted That the next Convention be holden at Fairfield 
in the County of Franklin. 

The Convention adjourned, without day. 

Attest, JOEL DOOLITTLE, Secretary. 



1814. 

Fairfield, June 22d, 1814. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont met agreeably to appointment. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson read Prayers and the Rev. 
J. P. K. Henshaw delivered a Sermon. 

Col. Bradley Barlow of Fairfield, Ebenezer Marvin, Jun. 
Esq., of St. Albans and Mr. Abijah Hawley of Fairfax, took 
their seats as lay Delegates. 

The Rev. Mr. Henshaw was requested to sit as President 
of the Convention, and the Rev. Mr. Bronson was chosen 
Secretary. 

Voted, That all the gentlemen present belonging to the 
Church be admitted to seats in this Convention. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, George Cleveland and Anson 
J. Sperry, Esq., were appointed the Standing Committee of 
this Diocese for the year ensuing. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Daniel Chipman, Esq., An- 
son J. Sperry, Esq., Elizur Hubbard, Esq., and Doct. Sam- 
uel Cutler were appointed Delegates to represent this Diocese 
in the next Convention of the Eastern Diocese. 

The next annual Convention of this Diocese was appoint- 
ed at Arlington. 

Adjourned. 

Attest, ABRAHAM BRONSON, Secretary. 



JO URKAL-1 8I4. Vll 

It is deemed proper to append to the foregoing Journal, a part 
of the Charge to the Clergy of the Eastern Diocese delivered hy 
Bishop Griswold hefore the Biennial Convention in Portsmouth, 
N. H., Sept. 28, 1814. The lapse of time has in no way impaired 
the pertinency of it : 

"Reverend Brethren in Christ, 

AND Christian Friends: — 
The twenty-third Canon of the General Convention makes it 
the duty of every Bishop of our Church in these United States, to 
deliver 'Charges to the Clergy of his Diocese.' This duty, in the 
events of Divine Providence, lias devolved upon one the least 
worthy to address you on such an occasion, and who, at the 
present time would rather hear than speak. But, called as I am 
to this office, it is fruitless to waste your time with apologies, or 
to anticipate those defects, which too soon will be apparent. The 
discourse which is well heard, 'with an honest and good heart,' 
and faithfully applied to practical purposes, is seldom wholly 
unprofitable ; and this good result may at least be expected from 
the following observations. It will be attempted to show the 
state and progress of our spiritual labors, and direct your atten- 
tion to some of those important duties, to which, as ministers of 
Jesus Christ, and stewards of the mysteries of God, we are now 
more especially called." 

"First of all we ought, brethren, and most earnestly, to call for 
united and fervent acknowledgements of gratitude and praise to 
the Father of mercies, and our Lord Jesus Christ, that this Con- 
vention is permitted once more to meet, under circumstances, so 
auspicious to the continued peace and prosperity of our com- 
munion. When we reflect on the many and complicated discour- 
agements and obstacles, under which the formation of this Diocese 
commenced ; the diminished and declining state of our Churches ; 
the unsocial habits of our brethren, from their remote and unor- 
ganized situation ; while the avails of the property, which had 
been charitably designed for religious purposes, were, in a great 
degree, diverted into other channels, and alienated from the use 
intended by the pious Donors : and when we further consider, 
notwithstanding these impediments, what, and how much beyond 
our expectation has been our prosperity ; what blessing has 



128 JO TJRKAL-1 8I4. 

attended the few zealous efforts whicli liave already been made ; 
what unanimity has prevailed in our councils ; what success 
attended our measures, — must we not see, and can we hesitate to 
acknowledge the hand of God, and the special favour of His kind 
Providence ? How ought this earnest of His goodness to awaken 
our zeal, and animate us to greater and persevering exertions I 
Our work is but commenced. How vast the field which opens 
before us ! The harvest truly is great, and the labourers few." 

" Among the things, which demand your wisest counsels and 
most vigorous efforts, stand first and most conspicuous the small 
number of our Churches; the declining state of some, which yet 
remain; and the still less number of ministers to labour in them. 
From the last of these evils evidently have proceeded, in no small 
degree, the other two. Many opportunities have passed away, 
and now are lost, where, in various parts of these four States, 
Churches with large and respectable congregations might have 
been established ; but, through want of clergymen to encourage 
the wishes, animate the zeal, and lead the devotions of the people, 
necessity has compelled them to form religious connections less 
agreeable to their choice and belief. In other instances, and they 
are not few, efforts are still making by pious individuals, or by 
small organized societies, to commence, or to continue their exist- 
ence as Episcopal Churches ; but there are no ministers of Christ 
to second their exertions ; to preach the word, and administer 
among them in holy things. Clouds of despondency darken 
around them ; their efforts languish, and their zeal is ' ready to 
die.' And, notwithstanding the few bright exceptions, which 
enliven the scene, we may well take up the lamentation of the 
prophet and bewail 'that the ways of Zion do mourn;' 'her gates 
are desolate;' 'her pleasant things decay;' 'her people sigh' while 
'they seek their bread;' while they feel the 'famine of hearing 
the word of God.' What is highly necessary to the increase and 
prospei-ity of the Church in every Diocese is peculiarly so in this : 
a competent number of clergymen, endued with knowledge, piety 
and zeal. Ministers of Christ we need, who possess the spirit of 
their Divine Master, and emulate the fidelity of His first Apostles; 
who have a serious concern for the salvation of mankind — a deep 
sense of the truths which they teach, and who illustrate and 



JOURJfAL-1814. 129 

enforce their heavenly doctrine, by their own good example. We 
need those, who will ' seek first the Kingdom of God and His 
righteousness;' whose meat and drink it is to do His will; who 
can renounce the world for Christ's sake, and prefer His glory to 
their own. In Churches, well established, a very moderate share 
of these necessary things — a decent deportment, and formal 
routine of official duties, may preserve them from decline. But 
here we have to strengthen the things which remain : we have to 
build up the waste places of Zion ; to repair the ruins of what is 
decayed ; nay, to build anew from the foundation. There is still, 
in many places, a call for our labours, where, by proper means 
and due attention, new Churches of our communion may yet, 
with the Divine blessing, be raised up ; where we may apparently 
be very instrumental in promoting the general interests of good 
morals and true religion ; of extending the Redeemer's Kingdom 
and the knowledge and comforts of His Salvation ; and contrib- 
uting to the increase and stability of public happiness and social 
order." 

" It is a duty then, highly incumbent, brethren, on us, whom 
the Lord has set as watchmen on this portion of Zion's towers 
by all possible means, to supply this deficiency of labourers ; by 
praying fervently and daily, that the Lord of the harvest will 
send them ; by encouraging worthy clergymen to come amongst 
and continue with us, and by bringing forward suitable candidates 
for the holy ministry : remembering, however, that their qualifi- 
cations are far more essential, than their numbers. Those, who 
have not the necessary foundation of inward piety and love of 
God — who appear not, from conscientious motives and a deep 
sense of its importance, to be seriously and zealously engaged in 
the sacred cause, however splendid or popular may be their talents 
will be of little real use in any Church, and least of all in ours. 
There are those, we fear, and their numbers not few, who run 
to this work before they are sent ; who enter the sacred ministry, 
without a due sense of its nature, and of the awful responsibility 
attached to the office. Those, most worthy and best qualified 
are often the most diffident ; and such should be sought for and 
encouraged to devote themselves to God. We need such, as have 
the good of religion more at heart, than its emoluments : those 



130 JOURJfAL-1814. 

who follow Christ for His sake ; who are willing to labour, before 
they reap — to make some sacrifice in the Redeemer's cause, that 
the poor may have the Gospel preached unto them." 

"It is a further duty, incumbent on us, in which, however, we 
can do but little without the aid of our lay brethren and the 
people of our congregations, to supply such Churches as are poor 
and destitute, with the preaching of the Word, the administration 
of the Sacraments and other means of religious edification." 

" True it is, that each minister of Christ has his peculiar charge 
— his family of Christians to provide for — a little flock committed 
to his care. In this charge it is indeed of the first importance, 
that he be found faithful — that the blessings of religion be diffused 
through every part of his cure, and each cottage be consoled with 
the salvation of our God. But we are bound to extend our care, 
as the Lord shall give us means, to other parts of His vineyard, 
and call upon our flocks to assist us. In this labour of love, 
should every Christian, according to his state and abilities, unite. 
And what Christian will say, that he cannot contribute something, 
to so good a work ? And who, that is able, will refuse to assist 
us ? Freely have we received : freely let us give. Shall any, to 
whom the arm of the Lord is revealed — who are called to a 
knowledge of Divine grace, and enjoy themselves the blessings of 
the Gospel, feel no solicitude to dispense the same blessings to all 
whom they equally concern ? Are we refreshed, at the fountain 
of living waters, with bread enough and to spare, and yet have 
no compassion for those who are perishing with hunger ? — who 
are parched in a thirsty land where no water is ?" 

" Is it not a fact, that we place improper reliance upon our 
orthodoxy, as supposing that truth will spread of itself and bear 
away the prize ; while others on a worse foundation, by using 
better diligence, build with more rapidity ? How is it to be 
lamented that knowledge and zeal, which God has joined together, 
should so often by man be put asunder ! Divine truth was never 
popular in this world, and never will be popular, till the nature of 
man is changed. While the true labourer sleeps, the enemy, ever 
vigilant, sows tares ; and when sown, they take such root that 
they must groio. They who are zealous in propagating the doc- 
trines of Christ, though with some mixture of error, will be more 



JOURJ^AL-1814. 131 

Buccessful, and indeed more useful, than others who, with a 
sounder creed, are lukewarm. If we would maintain that rank 
among the champions of the cross to which we think ourselves 
entitled, let us not reiy on the paper arms of canons, creeds and 
articles ; but put on the whole armour of God : let us press 
forwards amidst the perils of the holy warfare, the first in labours 
or not the first in fame. When Peter the Apostle was going 
forth to the good fight of faith, how did his Master direct him to 
distinguish his love above that of others ? By his fidelity in 
dispensing the words of life : ' feed my lambs — feed my sheep.' 
Those who thus 'rule well,' and 'labour in the word and doctrine,' 
with fidelity, shall 'be counted worthy of double honour.' Let us 
be so distinguished." 



To this Convention Bishop Griswold made the following 
Address ; 

" Respected Brethren and Friends : 

After the exercises already performed, it would be inexpedi- 
ent to detain this Convention with any further Address than what 
is indispensably required by the 45th Canon ; according to the 
requisitions of which I shall proceed briefly to lay before you the 
state of the Churches and my official ministrations since your last 
meeting. 

In the course of the two years confirmations have been holden 
at Newport, Bristol and Providence; at Trinity and Christ 
Churches in Boston ; also at Salem, Newbury Port, Dedham, 
Newton, Greenfield; at Portsmouth, Claremont, Middlebury, 
Fairfield and Cornish. Other Churches have been visited. The 
whole number confirmed is 429. The administration of this rite 
appears generally to have been attended with the Divine blessing, 
and to have had a very good and pleasing effect in exciting piety 
and devout affections ; and most earnestly is it to be wished that 
the friends of our Church — its ministers especially, were more 
careful and diligent to teach the nature, design and usefulness of 
Confirmation, that all may know and feel their duty, and be pre- 
pared to receive it with those godly motives and pious affections 
which are chiefly necessary to the obtaining of the spiritual bene- 
fits of this ordinance. 



132 JOVEJ^AL-1814. 

Two new Churches in Massachusetts, at Xewton and Green- 
field, have been erected, and solemnly consecrated to the worship 
of Almighty God. The zeal and pious labours of the congrega- 
tions or people, through whose great exertions, assisted by the 
generous contributions of many individuals in other towns and 
States, these Churches have been erected, merit the thanks and 
the applause of every Christian ; and with great pleasure do I 
take this opportunity of bearing testimony to their laudable exam- 
ple. With some further encouragement and aid from their chari- 
table Christian friends there is a good prospect that through the 
blessing of God, two flourishing parishes will be added to our 
communion. 

The Rev. Nathaniel Huse, Deacon of Connecticut has been 
ordained priest; and Mr. Evan M. Johnson, then of the same 
state, Deacon. Messrs. John P. K. Henshaw, Titus Strong, and 
Silas S. Safford, have also been admitted to the order of Deacons. 
On the list of Candidates for Holy Orders in this Diocese, there 
remain Messrs. Chever Felch, Walter Cranston, James B. Howe, 
Thomas Carlisle and Isaac Bayle. 

By the death of the Rev. Nathaniel Fisher the Church in Salem 
has become and still remains vacant. The Churches, also, in 
Marblehead, Gardiner, Vergennes, and several others are destitute 
of ministers in Holy Orders. The Rev. Parker Adams and the 
Rev. Mr. Henshaw have removed from this Diocese into the State 
of New- York. The Rev. James Bowers officiates in Narragan- 
set, the Rev, Titus Strong in Greenfield, the Rev. Mr. Safford in 
Middlebury. 

Agreeably to a resolution of the Biennial Convention of 1812, 
a circular Address was sent to the several Churches in the Diocese 
for a contribution on the ensuing Easter, which with very few 
exceptions was complied with, and the sum of about 550 dollars 
transmitted to the Treasurer of the Board of the Trustees of 
Donations, This favoiirable commencement promised a little fund 
which would be of very great utility to this Diocese, where are 
many small Churches which very much need charitable assistance. 
But these pleasing anticipations have been since but partially 
realized. On Easter last but few Churches had any contributions, 
and the whole sum collected was but about 150 Dollars. Of 



JOVEXAL-1814- 133 

these contributions 165 dollars have been appropriated to the 
printing and distributing of tracts, which from some peculiar cir- 
cumstances, not unfavourable, has been delayed. The Eev. Mr. 
Henshaw was employed about one year as a missionary, who offi- 
ciated chiefly in Marblehead and received from this fund 100 dol- 
lars. The Rev, Mr. Humphery has also been engaged to officiate 
for a few months in Taunton and Bridgewater. To him 50 dollars 
have been paid, and about as much more is probably due. We 
have made a reserve in favour of some other Churches, especially 
in Vermont, still hoping to find some fit person to send among 
them. There are also some petitions for assistance from this 
fund, which I did not think myself authorized to grant without 
the advice of this Convention. 

That the Lord may assist our counsels, awaken our zeal, and 
bless our labours to His glory, and the peace and prosperity of 
His Church, is the sincere prayer, Gentlemen, of your friend and 

brother, 

ALEX. V. GRISWOLD." 

The foregoing Address is copied from the Records of the 
Eastern Diocese. 

In the Convention of the Eastern Diocese in 1814 no Delegate 
was present from Vermont. But, seemingly with a view to some 
petition or overture from some party in this State, the following 
action was had in reference to the Glebe Lands. Although this 
property was mostly taken from the Church during the next year 
by a decision of the Supreme Court of the United States in the 
case of Pawlet against Clark, yet it may be well to record what, 
in regard to it, was contemplated. The Convention of 1812 
passed a similar vote respecting the Glebe Lands in !N^ew- 
Hampshire. 

On motion voted and resolved. That the Trustees of Donations 
to the Protestant Episcopal Church be, and they hereby are 
authorized, empowered and required to take and exercise all the 
right and authority which this Convention possesses in relation 
to certain Glebe Lands, situate in the State of Vermont; and 
that said Trustees hereafter have and exercise the charge, care 
and disposition of the said lands in the same full and ample 
manner, and for the same purposes as this Convention would do ; 



134 JOUBJfAL-1815. 

to whom ' Jill the power, right and authority of said Convention 
in and about the premises are hereby granted and transferred. 

Voted and resolved, That the Rt. Rev. Bishop Griswold, Wil- 
liam Winthrop, Esq. and the Rev. Mr. Bronson be, and they 
hereby are appointed a Committee to execute under seal a suffi- 
cient conveyance of said Glebe Lands in conformity to the pre- 
ceding vote. 

On motion resolved, That a Committee be appointed by the 
Bishop to wait on General Morris of Springfield, Vermont, and 
inform him, that in the opinion of this Convention, the Trustees 
of Donations to the Protestant Episcopal Church are a proper 
authority to receive in trust the Church Lands now in his posses- 
sion, and to request him to convey the same to said Trustees." 
Records Eastern Diocese. 



1815. 

Arlington, June 28th, 1815. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Vermont met agreeably to appointment. 

The Eev, Stephen Jewet read Prayers and the Rev. Silas 
Safford delivered a Sermon. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Arlington, 
The Rev. Silas Safford, Middlehury, 
Mr. Enos Canfield, Arlington, 
Mr. Jeremiah Stratton, Manchester, 
Mr. Calvin Sell an, Middlehury, 
took their seats as Members of the Convention. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President and 
Anson J. Sperry, Secretary. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Silas Safford and 
Anson J. Sperry were appointed the Standing Committee 
of this Diocese for the year ensuing. 

Pursuant to the 45th Canon of the General Convention 
the Parochial Reports were called for and read as follows : 



J0VBKAL-1S15. 135 

ARLINGTON. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — Adult, 1; Children, 7; Marriages, 3; Funerals, 2; 
Communicants, 75. 

MANCHESTER. 

THE REV ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — Children, 5; Marriages, 1; Funerals, 3; Com- 
municants, 20 ; Funerals, abroad, 2. 

MIDDLEBURY. . 

THE REV. SILAS SAFFORD, MINISTER. 

Baptisms — Children, 6; Baptisms abroad, Children, 1; Funer- 
als, 4 ; Marriages, 2. 

The following Preamble and Resolution were passed : 
Whereas the Board of Trustees of Donations to the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church, in the Eastern Diocese, in the 
United States of America, in view of a Resolution of the 
General Convention, of the Bishops, Clergy and Laity of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in said States, holden in the 
City of New Haven, on the third Tuesday in May 1811, 
have recommended to the Venerable Society for the Propa- 
gation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, in England, the 
Rt. Rev. Alexander Viets Griswold, Bishop of the Eastern 
Diocese, of Rhode Island, the Rev. Silas Safford, the Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, the Hon. Daniel Chipman and Anson J. 
Sperry, Esq. of Vermont, all of said Diocese, as Agents and 
Attornies, to whom the Society may with safety confide the 
care of their Lands, in said State of Vermont, therefore in 
pursuance of said Resolution of the General Convention 
aforesaid — 

Resolved, That the Ecclesiastical Convention of Vermont 
do fully approve of the Rt. Rev. Alexander Viets Griswold, 



136 JOVnKAL-1815. 

Bishop of the Eastern Diocese, including the State of New- 
Hampshire, Khode-Island, Massachusetts and Vermont, of 
Ehode-Island, the Kev. Silas Saiford, the Rev. Abraham 
Bronson, the Hon. Daniel Chipman, and Anson J. Sperry, 
Esq. of Vermont, above named as suitable and proper persons 
as Agents and Attornies, to whom the Venerable Society 
aforesaid, may with safety confide the care of their Lands 
above named, with such power and authority as the Society 
shall deem expedient and proper to grant ; and the Standing 
Committee of this Convention are hereby especially instructed 
and directed, from time to time, to take such measures as they 
shall think most advisable, to obtain the object aforesaid, (a) 
On motion of the Rev. Mr. Bronson the following Canon 
in leiu of the second Canon now in force, was passed : 

OF THE MODE OF FORMING AND ORGANIZING CHURCHES. 

Whenever any number of persons in this State shall form 
themselves into a regular Society, of the persuasion of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in such a manner that will 
become a body corporate according to law, and their proceed- 
ings shall be sanctioned by the Bishop of the Diocese, or in 
case of no Bishop, by the Standing Committee of the State 
Convention, they shall be admitted to all the rights and 
privileges of a regular Church, subject, however, at all times 
to the authority and discipline of said Bishop, or if there is 
no Bishop, of said Standing Committee. 

Voted, That the second of the former Canons be and the 
same is hereby repealed. 

Voted, That the next Convention of , this Diocese be 
holden at Vergennes, on the fourth Wednesday of June, 
1816. 

The Convention adjourned, without day. 

Attest, ANSON J. SPERRY, Secretary. 



JOVnKAL-1815. 137 

(a) Dr. Stewart, who had been long waiting the favorable 
moment, visited Vermont in May of that year — 1815 — and pro- 
posed to take charge of our petition. The papers were immedi- 
ately prepared, were signed the next month in Convention at Ar- 
lington and forwarded to Dr. Stewart in Canada, who set off for 
Europe in July. In December following the Society passed a 
resolution to grant our request, but directed their Secretary to 
require of the Agents a bond against any costs which might arise 
in suits for the recovery of the lands. This occasioned a delay of 
one year or more, so that the power of attorney with the affidavits 
and certificates of its authenticity was not received till April 
1817." It is due to Bishop Stewart to state, that though he 
spent much time, and seventy or eighty dollars in attending to 
the business yet after a delay of four or five years, he would accept 
of no more than sixty dollars ; and even that he generously gave 
to the Church in the States. Bronson's Letters, Gambler Obser- 
ver, Nov. 7, 1834. Episcopal Recorder, Feb. 28, 1835. 

In February of this year the suit of the Town of Pawlet against 
Daniel Clark and others, commenced in 1810, involving the Glebe 
Reservations, in the New Hampshire Grants, was decided in the 
Supreme Court of the United States at Washington. The follow- 
ing account of the case, of the decision, and of the subsequent 
action of the State, may be here properly inserted. 

This was a case certified from the Circuit Court for the district 
of Vermont, in which upon an action of ejectment brought by 
the town of Pawlet to recover possesion of the Glebe lot as it was 
called, in that town, the opinions of the Judges of that court were 
opposed upon the question, whether judgment should be rendered 
for the plaintiff or for the defendants, upon a verdict found, subject 
to the opinion of the court upon the following case stated : 

" In this cause it is agreed on the part of the plaintiffs that the 
lands, demanded in the plaintiff.s declaration, are a part of the land 
granted, in the charter of the town of Pawlet, by the former 
Governor of the province of New Hampshire, as a Glebe for the 
Church of England as by law established ; and that in the year 
1802 there was in the town of Pawlet a society of Episcopalians 
duly organized agreeably to the rules and regulations of that de- 
nomination of Christians heretofore commonly known and called 



138 JOUBMAL-1815. 

by the name of the Church of England. That in the same year the 
said society contracted with the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, a regu- 
lar ordained Minister of the Episcopal Church, who then resided 
in Shelbourne, in the County of Chittenden, but had not any set- 
tlement as clerk or pastor therein, to preach to the said society in 
the town of Pawlet at certain stated times, and to receive the 
avails of the lands in question, and that the said Chittenden 
thereupon gave a lease of the said land to Daniel Clark and others» 
who went into the possession of the premises, and still hold the 
same under the said lease, and that the said Chittenden preached 
regularly and administered the ordinances to the people of the 
said society, according to his said contract, and received the rents 
and profits of the said land until the year of our Lord Christ 1809, 
when the said Chittenden deceased; and that in 1809 the said 
Society contracted with the Rev. Abraham Brownson, a regular 
ordained minister of the Episcopal Church, residing in Manches- 
ter, and officiating there a part of the time, to preach to the said 
society a certain share of the time, and to receive the rents and 
profits of the said lands ; and that the said Brownson has regularly 
attended to his duty in the said Church, and administered ordi- 
nances in the same until September, 1811, about which time the 
said Society regi:larly settled the Rev. Stephen Jewett, who now 
resides in the said town of Pawlet, and Avho from the time of his 
settlement is to receive all the temporalities of the said Church. 
And it is further agreed by the said parties, that the General As- 
sembly of the State of Vermont, on the 5th of November 1805, 
did grant to the several towns in this State, in which they respect- 
ively lie, all the lands granted by the king of Great Britain to the 
Episcopalian Church by law established, and that the lands, in the 
plaintiff's declaration mentioned and described, are part of the 
lands so granted by the king of Great Britain to the Episcopalian 
Church." 

This cause was argued in 1814 by Messrs. Pitkin and Webster, 
for the Plaintiffs, and by Mr. Shepherd, for the Defendants. At 
the February Term 1815, Mr. Justice Story delivered the Opinion 
of the majority of the Court. This opinion was " that upon the 
special statement of facts by the parties, judgment ought to pass 
for the Plaintiff's." 



JOUBMAL-1815. 139 

The following synopsis will indicate the ground taken by the 
Majority of the Court : 

This Court has jurisdiction, where one party claims land under 
a grant from the State of New-Hampshire, and the other under a 
grant from the State of Vermont, although at the time of the first 
grant, Vermont was part of New-Hampshire. 

A grant of a tract of land in equal shares to sixty-three persons, 
to be divided among them into sixty-eight equal shares, with a 
specific appropriation of five shares, conveys only a sixty-eighth 
part to each person. If one of the shares be declared to be " for 
a Glebe for the Church of England as by law established," that 
share is not holden in trust by the grantees, nor is it a condition 
annexed to their rights or shares. 

The Church of England is not a body-corporate, and cannot 
receive a donation eo nomine. 

A grant to the Church of such a place is good at common 
law, and vests the fee in the parson and bis successors. If such a 
grant be made by the crown, it cannot be resumed by the crown 
at its pleasure. Land at common law may be granted to pious 
uses before there is a grantee in existence competent to take it 
and in the mean time the fee will be in abeyance. Such a grant 
cannot be resumed at the pleasure of the crown. 

The common law, so far as it related to the erection of Churches 
of the Episcopal persuasion of England, the right to present or 
collate to such Churches, and the corporate capacity of the parsons 
thereof to take in succession, was recognized and adopted in 
New-Hampshire. It belonged exclusively to the crown to erect 
the Church in each town that should be entitled to take the Glebe, 
and upon such erection to collate, through the Governor, a parson 
to the benefice. 

A voluntary society of Episcopalians within a town, unauthor- 
ized by the crown, could not entitle themselves to the Glebe» 
Where no such Churcb was duly erected by the crown, the Glebe 
remained as an haereditas jacens, and the state which succeeded to 
the rights of the crown, might, with the assent of the town, alien 
or encumber it; or might erect an Episcopalian Church therein, 
and collate, either directly or through the vote of the town indi- 
rectly, its parson, who would thereby become seized of the Glebe 



140 JOURMAL-ISW. 

jure ecclesicB, and be a corporation capable of transmitting the 
inheritance. 

By the Eevohition, the State of Vermont succeeded to all the 
rights of the crown, to the unappropriated as well as appropriated 
Glebes. 

By the statute of Vermont of the 30th of October 1794, the 
respective towns became entitled to the property of the Glebes 
therein situated. 

A legislative grant cannot be repealed. 

No Episcopal Church in Vermont can be entitled to the Glebe, 
unless it was duly erected by the crown before the Revolution, 
or by the State since. 3 Curtis' Rep. 358—374. (9 Cranch 292.) 

, An Act of the Legislature, passed in 1816, properly belongs 
here, and finishes thus far the history of the Glebe Rights : 

It is Jierely enacted hy the General Astemhly of the State of Ver- 
mont, That the Selectmen of the town of Pawlet are hereby au- 
thorized and directed to collect and appropriate the rents arising 
from the Glebe lands in said Pawlet, to an amount not exceeding 
Five Hundred Dollars, and apply the monies collected therefrom 
to the discharge and payment of the costs and expenses which the 
said town has been subject to, in prosecuting a suit tried and de- 
termined before the Supreme Court of the United States holden 
at the city of Washington, in favor of said town against Daniel 
Clark of said Pawlet, any law, usage or custom to the contrary 
notwithstanding." Passed Nov. 5, 1816. Laws of Vermont 
October Session 1816, pp. 96, 97. 



1816. 

Vergennes, June 26th, 1816. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont, met agreeably to appointment. 

The Kev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President and 
the Rev. Silas Saflford, Secretary, pro tern. The following 
gentlemen were present as Members : 



JOUBMAL-1816. 141 

The Rev. Stephen 'Beach. 

SHELBURNE: 

John Simonds. 

VERGENNES: 

Smith Booth. 

MIDDLEBURY : 

Daniel Henshaw. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stephen Beach, 
and Anson J. Sperry, were appointed the Standing Com- 
mittee for the year ensuing. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stephen Beach, 
the Rev. Silas Safford, Daniel Henshaw, Esq., A. W. Bar- 
num, Esq., Mr. Orange Ferris and Mr. Martin C. Deming, 
were appointed Deputies to the next General Convention'of 
the United States to be holden in the City of New York, on 
the third Tuesday of May 1817. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Arlington; the Rev. Stephen 
Beech, Fairfield; the Rev. Silas Safford, Middlebury; the 
Hon. Dudley Chase, Randolph; Col. Bradley Barlow, Fair- 
field; A. W. Barnum, Esq., Vergennes; and the Hon. Jona- 
than H. Hubbard, Windsor; were appointed Delegates to the 
Diocesan Convention to be holden at Windsor in the State 
of Vermont on the last Wednesday in September 1816. 

Daniel Henshaw, Middlebury; Maj. John S. Gallop, Shel- 
don; Thomas Leverett, Esq., Windsor; and Anson J. Sperry, 
Esq., Manchester; were appointed as Substitutes for the above 
Delegates to the Diocesan Convention. 

Anson J. Sperry, Esq. was elected Secretary of the Con- 
vention. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of this Convention be re- 
quested to circulate a paper for subscriptions among the 
friends of the Church, in this State, for the purpose of rais- 
ing money to prosecute the claim of the Church to the 
Society Lands. 



142 JOUBJfAL-1816. 

Voted, That the Standing Committee be directed to 
appoint a place for the next Meeting of this Convention, 
and cause notice thereof to be seasonably given in the pub- 
lic papers. 

Pursuant to the 45th Canon of the General Convention 
the parochial reports were read as follows, viz. 

ARLINGTON; 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms— Adults, 1, Children, 7; Marriages, 3; Funerals, 15 ; 
Communicants, 70. 

MANCHESTER. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 1 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 5 ; Communicants, 20. 
MIDDLEBURY. 

THE REV. SILAS SAFFORD, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 3; Marriages, 1; Funerals, 2; Communicants, 13; 
FAIRFIELD. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 16; Burials, 2 ; Communicants, 44. 
ST. ALBANS. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 10; Burials, 1; Communicants 10. 
SHELDON. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 3; Communicants, 11. 

The Convention adjourned, sine die. 

SILAS SAFFORD, Secretary pro tern. 



J0URMAL~1816. 143 

The following extracts from the "Address to the Convention of 
the Eastern Diocese, holden at Windsor, Vermont, September 25, 
1816, by the Right Rev. Bishop Gris wold," are here appropriate. 

" My Friends and Brethren : 

Through the merciful goodness of our God and Saviour, we 
are permitted to convene for the very inportant purpose of consul- 
ting on the interest and welfare of that portion of Christ's Church 
intrusted to our ministry and oversight, and to transact such busi- 
ness, as by its constitution and usage, appertains to this Conven- 
tion, It becomes my duty at this time to lay before you a state- 
ment of my official proceeding since our last meeting, and such 
other things respecting the condition of our Churches, as may 
assist your deliberations, and lead to those measures, which shall 
best promote their interest and prosperity." 

" There have been admitted, as Candidates for Holy Orders, 
Jonathan M. Wainwright, Gideon Olney, George T. Chapman, 
Joseph R. Andrus, Alston Gibbs, Benjammin B. Smith, Reuel 
Keith, George Otis and Tafts." 

" To the Holy Order of Deacons have been admitted, Walter 
Cranston, John L. Blake, Stephen Beach, Thomas Carlile, Chever 
Felch, George S. White, Joseph R. Andrus, and George T. Chap- 
man, Also, the Rev. Titus Strong and the Rev. John L. Blake, 
Deacons, have been ordained Priests." 

"Mr, Beach is now officiating in Fairfield, Sheldon and St. Albans, 
in Vermont : and of his success we have the most pleasing intelli- 
gence, A very considerable number of communicants have already 
been added to those Churches, Large congregations attend his 
preaching, A spirit of religious inquiry and awakened concern for 
the one thing needful, extensively prevails in those parts ; and 
cheering are the prospects of still greater increase, both in members 
and piety. At Fairfield they are erecting a house for the worship 
of God, and already is the pious work in great forwardness. Indeed 
the number of new Churches which are now building, or will prob- 
ably soon be commenced, is one of the best proofs of the increasing 
zeal amongst our people, for the service of God, and support of 
His holy worship. It is a zeal which ought to be much encouraged 
and a work to which we should lend every possible aid. The want of 



144 JOVRKAL-ISIG, 

Churches is one of the great inconveniences which we have to con- 
tend with. At Bellows Falls, also in Lenox and Hopkinton, in Massa- 
chusetts, are Churches erecting." — "In Middlebury, it has pleased 
the Lord to pour out of His Spirit, and awaken many to righteous- 
ness. They also have it in serious contemplation, to erect a house 
to the worship of Almighty God, and it is earnestly commended to 
the friends of our communion, to assist them in a work which is so 
very important and interesting to our Church." 

"Most of the'Churches also in tliis Diocese have I, since the last 
meeting of this Convention, visited once, and some of them twice 
or three times. But with deep regret it must be acknowledged 
that duties of a parish, and other causes, have hitherto rendered 
impracticable such frequent visitations, as the good of the Churches 
requires : and some especial^ of those most remote have been too 
long neglected." 

" Confirmation has been administered once, or more, in Bridge- 
water, Greenfield, Salem, Newburyport, Cambridge, Great-Bar- 
rington, Lenox, and Lanesborrough, in Massachusetts; in Bristol, 
Rhode Island ; and in Arlington and Middlebury, in Vermont. The 
whole number confirmed is but 194. It is expected soon, the Lord 
permitting, that there will be confirmations in some of our largest 
Churches. Though the number is small, there is reason to beleive 
and there is much comfort in believing, that the few who have re- 
ceived confirmation, are truly pious, and such as will through divine 
grace, lead the rest of their life according to this beginning ; and 
that a very considerable number more, of the like, description, are 
now ready to be confirmed. There is cause, however, still for re- 
peating, what was observed before you at our last Convention, that 
we do not, so generally as we ought, avail ourselves of the practical 
benefits of this ordinance. The two Sacraments excepted, there is 
none which has been so blest among us, wherever it has been 
administered." 

" With lively gratitude to the Father of mercies, and the great 
Head of the Church, we are bound to acknowledge, that at no 
former period has the general state of religion, in this Diocese, 
been so vigorous and promising. In many places are small socie- 
ties forming, or people desirous to form them ; and a call for 
Clergymen and missionary labours is heard in almost every part. 



JOURJ^AL-1817. 145 

But of these there is great deficiency. Frequently is the request 
made by Churches destitute, that ministers may be sent them ; but 
we have none to send; nor can we, but in a. small degree, avail 
ourselves of these favourable circumstances. It is painful, that 
there should be this famine of hearing the word of God, and no 
means be found to relieve it. How fervently, and without ceasing, 
ought we to pray the Lord of the harvest, that He will send labour- 
ers into it. Had we a competent number of such labourers, as 
the Lord himself sends, how gloriously would His work increase ! " 
Christian Journal, vol. i, pp. 209 — 214. (July 1817.) 



. 1817. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Vermont met according to appointment at 
Midcllebury on the fourth Tuesday in June 1817. 

The following gentlemen were present as Members, viz. 
The Kev. Abkaham Bronson, The Eev. Stephen Beach. 
middlebury : 
Horatio Seymour, Daniel Chipman. 

VERGENNES: 

DuRAND Robberts, Samuel B. Booth. 

RUTLAND : 

William Fay, Jesse Gove. 

ST. ALBANS: 

Asahel Smith. 

WINDSOR : 

Thomas Thomas. 

SHELDON : 

Joel Clap. 

FAIRFIELD: 

Nathan LoBDELL., 

SHELBURN and BURLINGTON. : 

Bela Chittenden. 



146 JOVRKAL-18T7. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was elected President and 
George Cleveland, Secretary. 

The Rev. G-eorge Leonard and Mr. Daniel Henshaw, were, 
on motion, admitted to seats in the Convention. 

Whereas it appears that several Churches in this State 
have sent more delegates than is permitted by the Consti- 
tution, on motion, it was resolved, That they be permitted 
to take their seats in the Convention, 

The Rev. Stephen Beach presented the report of the 

Churches in Fairfield, Sheldon and St. Albans, which was 

read. 

The Convention adjourned until Thursday next at 8 

o'clock, A. M. 

Thursday morning. The Convention met agreeably to 
adjournment. 

Mr. Abijah Hawley from Fairfax appeared and was ad- 
mitted to a seat in the Convention. 

The following persons were elected the Standing Com- 
mittee of the Diocese for the year ensuing, viz. The 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stephen Beach and the 
Hon. Daniel Chipman. 

A Communication was then read from the Secretary of 
the General Convention relative to altering the time of 
holding the same from the third Tuesday in May to the 
first Tuesday in October in the year 1823, which was 

agreed to. 

Voted, That a Committee of three be appointed to revise 
the Constitution and Canons of the Episcopal Church in 
this State, and report the same to the next Annual Con- 
vention. 

Whereas there are several societies in this State, profes- 
sing to be Episcopalians, which are not legally formed into 
Societies, agreeable to the Canons of the Church and the 
Laws of this State — 

Resolved, therefore. That the Secretary of this Conven- 
tion be directed to write to all the Societies in this State 



JO UUKAL-l 817. 147 

and advise them, if they have not already done it, so to 
form themselves into Societies agreeable to the Laws of this 
State, stating to them at the same time, the importance 
thereof, and likewise to recommend to the Agents of the 
Society's Lands not to appropriate the avails of any such 
lands to such Societies until they are regularly and legally 
formed, and that such Societies be requested to forward to 
the next Annual Convention copies of their respective 
Articles of Association, together with a particular report 
of the situation of the several Churches, at least so far as 
relates to the number of Communicants and prospects, and 
a^ description of the Propagation Eights of land in 'their 
vicinities. 

Resolved, That hereafter the Annual Convention of this 
Church shall be holden at such time and place as shall be 
determined upon by the next preceding Annual Convention, 
instead of the fourth Wednesday in June annually as now 
provided by the second Article of the Constitution ; and it 
shall be the duty of the Secretary to give at least two 
months notice of the time and place of holding such Con- 
vention by publication in one or more of the Newspapers 
prmted m this State, or by written communications to the 
respective Churches. 

Voted, That the thanks of this Convention be presented 
to the Rev. Stephen Beach for his Sermon delivered before 
this Convention. 

Voted, That the next annual meeting of the Convention 
of this Diocese be holden at Windsor on the 22d dav of 
May next. 

The Convention adjourned, sine die. 

GEORGE CLEVELAND, Secretary. 



To some persons, the following paper, the first Power of Attor- 
ney, executed by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts, December 5th, 1816, may possess some interest. 
It was received in Vermont in April 1817. As the lapse of time 



148 JOURKAL-1817. 

and circumstances have required, the appointment of new and 
additional Agents and Attorneys, this form has been renewed and 
re-issued. 

" To all people to whom these presents shall come : The Incor- 
porated Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts, established at the City of London, in that part of the king- 
dom of Great Britain and Ireland, called England, send Greeting: 

Whereas his Excellency Benning Wentworth, Esq., and his 
Excellency John Wentworth, Esq., late Governors and Com- 
manders in Chief in and over the late Province of New-Hampshire, 
now comprising the States of New-Hampshire and Vermont, did 
at divers times preceding the year of our Lord, One Thousand, 
Seven Hundred and Seventy-Five, by and with the advice of the 
then Council of the then Province aforesaid respectively give and 
grant to the above named Society one original right or share of 
land in each and every of the following towns, plantations and 
townships, situate in the said late Province now in the State of 
Vermont aforesaid, to wit : Arlington, Andover alias Weston, 
Addison, Averill, Bridgewater, Barnard, Bridport, Brunswick, 
Burlington, Bromley alias Peru, Bolton, Brattleborough, Berlin, 
Barnet, Clarendon, Castleton, Cavendish, Cornwall, Charlotte, 
Colchester, Corinth, Dorset, Danby, Duxbury, Draper, Dunbar, 
Essex, Farlee, Ferdinand, Ferrisburgh, Fullum, Fairfax, Fair- 
field, Glastenbury, Guildhall, Granby, Guilford, Georgia, Hartford, 
Harwich alias Mount Tabor, Hinesburgh, Highgate, Hungerford 
alias Sheldon, Hubberton, Jericho, Killington alias Sherburne, 
Ludlow, Leicester, Lemington, Lewis, Lunenburgh, Manchester, 
Maidstone, Middlebury, Monkton, Minehead, Moretown, Middle- 
sex, Milton, Mansfield, Norwich, New-Haven, New-Fane, New- 
Fairfield, Neshobe alias Brandon, New-Barnet, Newbury, New- 
Huntington, New-Marlborough, New-Stamford, Orwell, Pomfret, 
Pawlet, Poultney, Panton, Pocock alias Bristol, Putney, Pitts- 
field, Peacham, Rupert, Rutland, Rockingham, Reading, Ryegate, 
Saltash alias Plymouth, Stockbridge, Sunderland, Sandgate, Straf- 
ford, Sharon, Shaftsbury, Somerset, Shoreham, Salisbury, Stowe, 
St. Albans, Swanton, Shelburne, St. George, Smithfield, Sudbury, 
Springfield, Shrewsbury, Thetford, Tunbridge, Tinmouth, Towns- 
end, Tomliason, Topsham, Underbill, Windsor, Woodstock, Wil- 



JOVRNAL—1817. 149 

liston, Wostford, Whiting, Westminster, Weathersfiekl, Winhall, 
Wells, Wenlock, Weybridge, Wallingford, Woodford, Waterbury, 
and Worcester. 

Now Tcnow ye, tliat the said Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, have made, ordained, constituted and 
appointed, The Eight Reverend Alexander Viets Griswold, D. D. 
of Bristol in the State of Rhode-Island in the United States of 
America, the Reverend Abraham Bronson of Arlington, the Rev- 
erend Silas Safford of Middlebnry, Clerks, and the Honorable 
Daniel Chipman, Esquire of said Middlebury, and Anson Joseph 
Sperry, Esquire of Manchester, all in the State of Vermont in the 
United States aforesaid, their lawful Agents and Attorneys for 
and in the name of said Society, to ask, demand, sue for, appear, 
prosecute, have, recover, and receive possession of the aforesaid 
rights or shares of land, in the aforesaid towns, townships and 
plantations in said State of Vermont, granted to the said Society 
as aforesaid and not herein particularly specified, and for and in 
the name of said Society to lease, let, set or demise the aforesaid 
rights or shares of land, or any part or parts thereof, to such 
person or persons and for such term or number of years, and at 
or under such yearly or other rents as they or a majority of them 
shall think fit or proper ; and also in the name and behalf of said 
Society to ask, demand, sue for, have, recover and receive all 
rents, incomes and profits which are or shall become due and owing 
to said Society or in any way arise out of or from the said rights 
or shares of land in any of the towns, townships and plantations 
as aforesaid to and for the uses and purposes following, to wit : 
There shall be appropriated such parts and shares of said rents, 
profits and monies of the said several rights, and shares of land 
as aforesaid as the Agents and Attorneys shall judge just and 
proper to the use and benefit of such persons as may be duly and 
canonically consecrated to the office of Bishop over said State of 
Vermont and to the use and benefit of his successors in the office 
of Bishop in said State ; and the remaining income and profits 
of the aforesaid shares shall be appropriated to the use and sup- 
port of a clergyman or clergymen and his or their successors of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in each of the aforsaid towns, 
townships or plantations, when a Church shall be formed therein 



150 JOVRKAL-1817. 

and the worship of God performed according to the Liturgy of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America; 
and in the towns, townships and plantations aforesaid, where no 
Church is established as aforesaid, the said remaining income, 
rents and profits, shall be appropriated to the support of clergy- 
men, building of Chnrches, defraying the expenses of suits for the 
recovery of said rights and shares of land and the income and prof- 
its thereof, and for such other use and purposes as the said Agents 
and Attorneys shall judge will best conduce to the welfare of the 
Church in the said State of Vermont ; and to do all other acts 
and things, whatsoever that shall be necessary concerning the pre- 
mises as fully and in every respect as the said Society can or 
could do : and one or more Attorneys under them for the purposes 
aforesaid to make and again at their pleasure revoke. And the 
said Society doth hereby ratify and confirm ^yhatsoever their said 
Agents and Attorneys shall fully do or cause to be done in the 
premises in the name of said Society or otherwise by force of 
these presents. 

Witness whereof the said Society have hereunto affixed their 
common seal at Lambeth Palace in the County of Surry, in that 
part of the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, called England 
this 5th day of December A. D., 1816." 

The foregoing paper, with others, was " put into the hands of 
Mr. Chipman, who took about two years for the examination of 
the case before commencing any process. Then he brought a suit 
for land in New-Haven, near Middlebury, which was defended by 
■a grant of money from the State, and in March 1823, decided in 
the Supreme Court of the United States in favor of the Church." 
Bronson's Letters. Gambler Observer Nov. 14, 1834. Episco- 
pal Recorder Feb. 28, 1835. 



JOUBJrAL-1818. 151 

1818. 

Windsor, May 22, 1818. 

At a Meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the State of Vermont on the 22d day of 
May, 1818, at the Brick Meeting House in the town of 
Windsor, the following Clerical and Lay Delegates appear- 
ed, and, having produced satisfactory Credentials, took their 
seats, viz. 

The Eev. Abraham Bronson, Arlington. 
The Rev. Stephen Beach, Trinity Church, Fairfield. 
The Rev. George T. Chapman, Immanuel Church, 

Bellows Falls. 
The Rev. George Leonard, St, Paul's Church, Windsor. 
Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard, " " " 

Mr. Joel Clapp, Grace Church, Sheldon. 
Mr. James I. Cutler, Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls. 
Mr. Samuel A. Wilkins, Union Church, St. Allans. 

The Convention was duly organized by the appointment 
of the Rev. Abraham Bronson, President, and the Rev. 
George T. Chapman, Secretary. 

On motion the Convention adjourned for the purpose of 
attending Divine Service, to meet again at 2 o'clock, p. m. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. Mr. Beach, and 
a Sermon was delivered by the Rev. James Morss of New- 
buryport, Mass. Subsequently the Holy Eucharist was 
administered by the Rev. President. 

Two o'clock, p. M. The Convention met and adjourned 
until 6' o'clock in the Evening, at the house of the Hon, 
J. H. Hubbard, 

Six o'clock, p. M. The Convention assembled and pro- 
ceeded to business. 

On motion of the Rev. Stephen Beach, seconded by the 
Rev. Mr. Leonard, resolved. That the Rev. James Morss be 
admitted to the sittings of this Convention. 



152 JOUBJfAL-1818. 

On motion of the Kev. Mr. Beach, seconded by the Kev. 
President, resolved, That all gentlemen present, belonging 
to the Episcopal Church, be admitted to the sittings of this 
Convention. 

On motion resolved, That the Agents of the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts be request- 
ed to appoint an Agent, in each County in the State, to 
receive the voluntary surrender of the Lands belonging to 
said Society in their respective counties. 

On motion, resolved. That the Standing Committee of 
this Diocese consist of five Members. 

The Rev, Abraham Bronson, the Eev. George T. Chap- 
man, the Rev. George Leonard, Edward R. Campbell, Esq. 
and the Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard, were then duly elected 
the Standing Committee for the year.ensuing. 

The Convention made choice of the following gentlemen 
to represent this Diocese in the Biennial Convention of the 
Eastern Diocese to be held at Greenfield, Mass. on the last 
Wednesday of September next, viz. The Rev. Abraham 
Bronson, the Rev. George T. Chapman, the Rev. Stephen 
Beach, the Rev. George Leonard, the Hon. William Hall, 
Mr. Joel Clapp, Doct. Erastus Torrey, and Col. Jesse Gove. 

On motion resolved, That in case of the failure of either 
of the above Lay Delegates to attend the said Convention, 
the following persons be their respective Substitutes, to wit : 

For the Hon. William Hall, Mr. James I. Cutler. 
" Mr. Joel Clapp, Mr. Jeremiah Stratton. 
" Dr. Erastus Torrey, Thomas Thomas, Esq. 
" Col. Jesse Gove, Mr. Noble Hard. 

The following Parochial Reports were then read : — 

From Jane, 1817, to May, 1818, at Arlington: Baptisms — 
adults 11, children 1; Marriages 7; Funerals 8; Communi- 
cants, 86. 



JOVRKAL-1818. 153 

At Manchester^ during the same time : Baptisms — adults 8, 
children 2; Funerals 2; Communicants 37. 

At Middkhuri/, during the same time: Baptisms, 9; Funerals? 
1 ; Marriages, 1 ; Communicants, 30. 

Immanuel Church, Belhivs Falls, from December, 1815, to May, 
1818: Baptisms — adults 6, children 22; Funerals, 3; Marriages, 
4; Communicants, 11. 

Trinity Church, Rutland, for the same time : Baptisms — adults 
3, children 16. 

On motion resolved, That the Secretary of this Convention 
be requested to cany into effect a vote passed at the last 
Convention respecting the organization of the several 
Churches in the State. 

On motion, resolved, That the- thanks of this Convention 
be given to the Rev. James Morss for the excellent Discourse 
delivered by him at the opening of the same. 

On motion resolved, That the Clerical and Lay Delegates 
who shall attend the next Diocesan Convention be a Com- 
mittee to revise the Constitution and Canons of the Church 
in this State, and that the former Committee upon the 
subject be discharged. 

On motion resolved, That the next Annual Convention of 
this Diocese be holden at Rutland- on the fourth Wednesday 
of June, 1819. 

The Rev. George T. Chapman was appointed to deliver 
the Sermon at the opening of the next Convention. 

On motion resolved, That the Secretary be requested to 
return the thanks of this Convention to the Baptist Society 
in Windsor for the accommodation received in their place of 
Public Worship. 

On motion resolved, That the Secretary be requested to 
return the thanks of this Convention to the Hon. and Rev. 
Charles Stewart of Canada for the extraordinary attention 
and zeal evinced by him in procuring a Power of Attorney 
from the Society for the Propagation of the Grospel in 



154 / JOURMAL-1818. 

Foreign Parts, established in London, Great Britain, to the 
Agents of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of 
Vermont, so as to enable said Church to avail themselves of 
various tracts of land belonging to the above mentioned 
Society. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Beach, seconded by the Hon. 
Judge Hubbard, voted. That this Convention be adjourned, 
without day. 

Attest, QEORGE T. CHAPMAN, Secretary. 



The following paragraphs are quoted from the Address of 
Bishop Griswold before the Biennial Convention of the Eastern 
Diocese held at Greenfield, Mass. September 30th, 1818. They 
contain matter of interest respecting the Church in Vermont. 

Tuesday September 8th, 1818. "In Lanesborough, I was met 
by the Rev. Mr. Bronson. Wednesday the 9th, though the rain 
was violent, through the kindness of friends and the blessing of 
God, we reached Arlington in Vermont. On the way it was 
intended, had the weather been favorable to have preached in 
Bennington. In Arlington we found a people mnch alive to a 
sense of religion and much engaged in its duties. The Lord has 
there, during the present season awakened many to righteousness 
and added to His Church such, we hope, as shall be saved, 
Thursday the 10th, I preached and comfirmed in each of the two 
Churches in that town, and in one of them administered the 
Holy Communion. Here we had the pleasure of meeting Mr. 
Hawley, of Washington, the present Chaplain of the Senate of 
the United States : he assisted in the services and preached a 
third Sermon." 

"Friday the 11th, I visited in Manchester, another parish 
under the care of Mr. Bronson ; preached twice and administered 
Confirmation and the Lord's Supper. In that place, the Lord's 
work in converting the hearts of His people and adding many to 
His Church, is also marvellous in our eyes. The pastor of these 
two Churches is much blessed in seeing such abundant fruit of 
his labours. The number of his Communicants has been nearly 
doubled in the last few months." 



JOURKAL-1818. 155 

"The next day I pursued my journey to Rutland and preached 
on the way at Wallingford. The Episcopalians in Pavvlet and 
Wells are under the pastoral care of the Rev. Mr. Jewett : they 
attend public worship in the State of New- York and receive 
Confirmation in that Diocese. It was, therefore, not necessary 
that I should visit them." 

"Sunday the 13th, I was in Rutland and preached twice and 
confirmed a few. The congregation was large and attentive 
and appeared to be edified by the services. Very few of them 
had, before that day, seen a Confirmation. It is hoped that the 
solemnity will excite in others a desire to witness a like good 
• confession. It is about two years since a number of respectable 
people in Rutland formed themselves into an Episcopal Society : 
they have been very desirous to obtain the permanent services of 
a settled minister, and have manifested a very laudable liberality 
in offering to subscribe for his maintenance. They have been 
disappointed and disheartened; but not, I was happy to find in 
such degree as report had given reason to apprehend." 

"In the course of Monday the 14th, I reached Middlebury, hav- 
ing officiated, on the way, at Salisbury, where I met with the Rev. 
Mr. Leonard, in a low state of health. He has since returned to 
Windsor ; but much to his disappointment, he is unable to meet 
with us on this occasion. The Church in Middlebury is also des- 
titute of a minister, and will not probably increase until it is 
again blessed with the wholesome ministrations of the Word and 
Sacraments. I preached there once only on the 15th, attending 
also to some other necessary things, and engaging, should the 
Lord permit, to visit them on my return." 

" Wednesday- the 16th, I preached in Vergennes, where the 
Church is in a declining state, suffering as do many other parts 
of the Vineyard — the want of labourers. Could a clergyman 
have been continued in that place, the parish, no doubt, at the 
present time would have been large and flourishing. How earn- 
estly should we pray the Lord to send Labourers iiito His Vine- 
^yard, and show the sincerity of our prayers by our works. Are 
we content with saying to these our suffering brethren, ' be ye 
warmed and filled ?' At Vergennes I was happy in meeting the 



156 JOURKAL-1818. 

Rev. Mr. Beach, who since has kindly accompanied me, and given 
me much assistance." 

" On Thursday it rained much ; but through the generous 
assistance of kind friends, we reached Burlington in the evening. 
At Shelburne, on our way, we had the no small pleasure of assem- 
bling with the remnant of a Church, formerly the flock of the 
Rev. Mr. Chittenden. Unfavourable as the weather was, a re- 
spectable congregation convened. Mr. Beach performed Divine 
Service and baptized an adult. I preached and administered 
Confirmation and the Lord's Supper. The people appeared to be 
much gratified and encouraged by this visit, and there is reason 
to hope that, through the Lord's blessing, it will be permanently 
beneficial." 

" On Friday we reached St. Albans in season to unite with a 
pious people in the offices of Divine Worship. The Rev. Mr. 
Townsend, of Canada performed the evening service. I preached 
and administered Confirmation and the Eucharist. Our brethren 
among whom I officiated in that place and the towns adjoining, 
appeared highly to prize the privilege of those ordinances and by 
them to be edified." 

" On Saturday we pursued our journey to Sheldon, where 
though the rains continued, we found a large and very religious 
congregation assembled — ' all there present before God to hear all 
things that were commanded us by God.' There we had the 
pleasure of meeting with the Hon. and Rev. Dr. Stewart, who 
assisted in Divine Service. The people appeared to be uncom- 
monly devout and attentive, and to 'receive with meekness the 
engrafted word.' I preached and confirmed forty-nine, whose 
hearts, we have no reason to doubt, the Lord has renewed. There, 
too, I received some communications from Berkshire, about fifteen 
miles east of Sheldon, and the pleasing information, that a new 
Episcopal Society has recently there been organized with very 
favourable prospects of success. My time had been so completely 
appropriated by previous arrangements that to visit this new 
parish was found to be impracticable." 

" In the evening we reached Fairfield ; and with devout grati- 
tude to a kind protecting Providence ought I to acknowledge, 
that as on many occasions, so especially on this, my health received 



JOURMAL-1818. 157 

no injury from being exposed to wet and cold, immediately after 
long speaking in a crowded assembly." 

" At Fairfield on Sunday the 20th, we had an interesting day. 
Though the rain continued to fall incessantly and most of the 
people had several miles to travel, their new Church was filled at 
an early hour, with a large and very crowded assembly. The 
services were commenced by the solemn dedication of the house 
to the honour and worship of Almighty God. The Rev. Mr. 
Townsend performed Morning Prayer. The Rev. Mr. Beach 
administered Baptism. I preached and after Sermon confirmed 
forty-seven. After an intermission of thirty minutes, the Evening 
Service commenced : Prayers by Mr. Townsend. Mr. Beach was 
then instituted. Dr. Stewart delivered an excellent discourse • 
and after the Sermon, I administered the sacred Memorials of 
Christ's Body and Blood to one hundred and forty very devout 
Communicants. Daring the last three years the word preached 
has been very much blessed in Fairfield and Sheldon ; and not a 
little in Berkshire and St. Albans; and their pious pastor is much 
encouraged and refreshed in seeing his labours so prospered, and . 
one hundred and three pious converts of his flock present them- 
selves for Confirmation." 

" Monday the rain continued. By hard travelling we reached 
Burlington in season for Divine Service : Prayers by Mr. Beach 
who also baptized eight children. Tuesday by reason of continued 
rains, heavy travelling and an unpleasant accident, it was not 
without some difificulty that we reached Vergennes. Wednesday, 
I preached, confirmed and administered the Holy Communion in 
Middlebury. The two following days we passed over the Moun- 
tains to the eastern part of the State ; arriving in Windsor in 
season for Prayers and a Sermon on Friday evening. In that 
place, since the last Biennial Convention, has been formed an 
Episcopal Parish, highly respectable for the number, character 
and liberal zeal of its members. The Rev. Mr. Leonard is their 
minister. Saturday morning, I preached again in Windsor." 

" In the afternoon of Monday, we proceeded to Bellows Falls. 
There in Rockingham on the Vermont side is a Parish lately 
formed, which is already in a flourishing state under the pastoral 
care of the Rev. Mr. Chapman. They have erected a neat and 



158 JOURJfAL-1819. 

commodious Church, which about a year since was consecrated. 
They have also an excellent Choir of singers; and in proportion 
to their abilities, no people of the Diocese have gone before them 
in liberal efforts for the regular and decent ministrations of the 
blessed Gospel. There also, I preached and administered Con- 
firmation." 



1819. 

EuTLAND, June 23d, 1819. 
At a Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Vermont holden on the 23d day of June, 
1819, at the Court House in Rutland, the following Clerical 
and Lay Delegates appeared, and, having produced satis- 
factory Credentials, took their seats as Members, viz. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 

The Rev. Stephen Beach, 

The Rev. George Leonard, 

The Rev. Joel Clapp. 

Lay Delegates were present from the following Parishes : 

EUTLAND : 

Jesse Gove. 

ARLINGTON: 
Martin Webb. 

ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson. 

SANDGATE : 

Jordan Gray. 

middlebury: 
DoRASTUs Worcester. 

MANCHESTER: 

■Jeremiah Stratton. 

SHELBURNE: 

Bela Chittenden. 



J0VEJ{AL-1819. 159 

FAIRFIELD : 

Nathan Lobdell. 

CHARLOTTE : 

Gideon Prindlb. 

SHELDON: 

Joshua Brooks, 

WINDSOR: 

JosiAH Dunham. 

The Convention then proceeded to organize by choosing 
the Kev. Abraham Bronson, President, and Josiah Dunham, 
Esq. Secretary. 

Morning Prayer was said, a Sermon delivered by the Kev. 
George Leonard, and the Holy Communion was adminis- 
tered by the Rev. President. 

The Convention adjourned until 3 o'clock, p. m. 

Three o'clock, p. m. The Convention met according to 
adjournment. 

The following Parochial Reports were then presented : 

ARLINGTON. 

Baptisms (adults 6, childreu 3) — 9; Marriages, 2; Funerals, 
3; Communicants, 94. 

MANCHESTER. 

Baptisms (adults 9, cbildren 5) — 14 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals 
4; Communicants, 51. 

SANDGATE. 
Communicants, 11. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

Baptisms, 13; Funerals, 1 ; Marriages, 6; Communicants, 74. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 
Baptisms, 8 ; Funerals, 2 ; Marriages, 3 \ Communicants, 53. 



160 JOUBMAL-1819. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 
Funerals, 2; Communicants, 12. 

MONTGOMERY. 

Baptisms (adults 7, cliildren 33) — 40; Funerals, 4; Commu- 
nicants, 15. 

BERKSHIRE. 
Baptisms, 9; Funerals 2; Communicants, 6. 

SHELBURNE. 
Baptisms (adult 1, infants 2) — 3; Communicants, 18. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

Baptisms, 6; in Cornish, N. H. 3; Marriages, 2; Communi- 
cants, 35. 

TOTAL. 

Baptisms, 105, Funerals, 18, Marriages, 14, Communicants, 362. 

On motion, the Convention proceeded to the choice of a 
Standing Committee, for the year ensuing, when the Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stejphen Beach and the Rev. 
George Leonard were unanimously chosen. 

On motion, the following Resolution was read and adopt- 
ed, viz. 

Resolved, That the Senior Warden of each Church in 
this Diocese shall be requested to consider it his immediate 
duty to circulate a Subscription Paper in his Parish, or 
cause it to he done effectively, for the purpose of raising 
money to meet any expenses incurred, or that may be in- 
curred hereafter, in obtaining the charter of the Society 
Lands, in this State, and in prosecuting any suit for the 
recovery and possession of the same ; and, also, to make 
report of the sum raised without delay to the Hon. Daniel 
Chipman, the acting Agent in the case of said Lands. 



JOVRKAL-1819. 161 

On motion, the following Resolution was read and 
adopted : 

Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to receive and 
apply any donations that may be made for Missionary, or 
other purposes, to further the interests of the Church in 
this Diocese. 

The following gentlemen were appointed such a commit- 
tee, viz. The Rev. Stephen Beach, the Rev. Abraham 
Bronson, the Rev. G-eorge Leonard, the Rev. Joel Clap, 
Daniel Henshaw, Esq.,Alvin Leicester, Esq.,Wm. Hall, Esq. 

On motion the following gentlemen were chosen Deputies 
to the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, to be holden at Philadelphia on the 3d Tuesday 
in May next, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. 
Stephen Beach, the Rev. George Leonard, the Rev. Joel 
Clap, Clement Trowbridge, Esq., Josiah Dunham, Esq., 
Daniel Henshaw, Esq. and Jeremiah Stratton, Esq. 

On motion, resolved. That in case any of the Deputies, 
now chosen to the General Convention, should be unable 
to attend, lie is hereby authorized and empowered to ap- 
point a Substitute, vested with the same powers as those 
now appointed by this Convention. 

On motion, voted. That the thanks of this Convention 
be given to the Rev. George Leonard for his Sermon this 
day delivered before the Convention. 

The Convention adjourned until Evening. 

Evening. The Convention met according to adjournment. 

On motion, voted. That the Rev. George Leonard and 
Josiah Dunham be a Committee to revise the Constitution 
and Canons of the Church in this Diocese, and report at 
the next annual Convention. 

On motion, voted, That the next annual Convention of 
this Diocese be holden at Shelburne. 

On motion, voted. That this Convention do now adjourn, 
sine die, and it was adjourned accordingly. 

Attest, JOSIAH DUNHAM, Secretary. 



162 JOURMAL-1819. 

In the early part of 1819, a suit was brought in the Circuit 
Court of the United States for the District of Vermont against the 
town of New-Haven and William Wheeler to recover possession of 
the land in that township, granted to the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, by the Hon. Daniel Chipman, 
actino- in behalf of the Agents and Attorneys of that Society, In 
this Suit the State appeared as the Defendant. During the Session 
of the Legislature in the Fall of 1819, the following Act was 
passed, "appointing an Agent to defend a lawsuit therein mentioned." 

" Sec, 1. It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State 
of Vermont, that David Edmond of Vergennes, in the county of 
Addison be, and hereby is appointed an Agent, at the expense of 
this State, to defend a suit now pending in the Circuit Court of 
the United States for the Vermont District, in favor of the incor- 
porated society for the propagation of the Gospel in foreign parts, 
against the town of New-Haven, and one William Wheeler, for the 
recovery of one of the rights, or a part of a right, of land, originally 
granted by the government of Great Britain to said Society. 

Sec. 2. It is hereby further enacted that the Agent shall have 
full power and authority to employ assistant counsel, and defend, 
to final judgment the said suit, and in case of recovery in the 
Circuit Court, in favor of the Society, the Agent is authorized in 
his discretion, to appeal to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, and take such measures as to procure the opinion of the 
court thereon. And the Auditor of accounts against the State, 
is hereby authorized and directed to audit and allow the ac- 
count of the Agent, and draw orders on the Treasurer of this 
State, who is hereby directed to pay the same, out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated. 

Provided, however, that nothing contained in this act shall be 
construed as creating, or recognizing, any liability whatever, on 
the part of the State, to the town of New-Haven ; or to any other 
town, or to any person or persons whatsoever, to secure or defend 
the title or possession of the right of land above mentioned, or of 
any right of land of the same description in any other town 
except so far as is above provided in relation to the expenses of 
the said suit; — and 

Provided also, that the State shall not be liable to pay a sum 
exceeding Six Hundred Dollars towards the expenses of said suit. 
Passed Nov. 13, 1819." 

Laws passed by the Legislature of Vermont, 1819, pp. 40, 41. 



JOTJEKAL—ISW. 163 

1820. 

Shelburne, June 28th, 1820. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Vermont met agreeably to appointment. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. Stephen Beach, 

a Sermon was delivered by the Rev. Abraham Bronson, and 

the Holy Communion administered by the Rev. Mr. Beach. 

The following gentlemen were present as Members and 

Delegates, viz. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
The Rev. Stephen Beach, 
The Rev. Joel Clap, 

sandgate : 
Jordan Gray. 

BERKSHIRE: 

Amherst Willoughby. 

ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson. 
charlotte: 
John Cobb. 

ARLINGTON: 

Daniel B. Tuthill. 

SHELDON: 

Charles B. Wesson. 

vergennes : 
Samuel H. Tupper. 
fairfield: 
Nathan Lobdell, John Hendrick. 

montgomery: 
RuFus Smith. 

MIDDLEBURY: 

Dorastus Wooster, 

SHELBURNE: 

Heman Chittenden. 



164 JOUBJfAL-1820. 

The Rev, Abraham Bronson was chosen Presidentj Josiah 
Dunham, Esq. Secretary and the Rev. Joel Clap assistant 
Secretary. 

The Convention then adjourned until 4 o'clock, P. M. 

Four o'clock, P. M. The Convention assembled agree- 
ably to adjournment. 

On motion of the Rev. Stephen Beach, resolved, That all 
members of the Episcopal Church present, desiring to sit 
with us, be admitted to seats in this Convention. 

The Parochial Reports were then called for and read as 

follows, viz. 

MANCHESTER. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 2 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 2 ; Communicants, 52. 
ARLINGTON. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 1, children 1) — 2; Funerals, 10; Communi- 
cants, 92. 

SANDGATE. 

JORDAN GRAY, LAY REABER. 

Baptisms, 16 ; Communicants, 25. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 7, children 7) — 14; Marriages, 5; Funerals, 
2 ; Communicants, 64. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 8 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 6 ; Communicants, 49. 
UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. • 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 7 ; Funerals, 1 ; Communicants, 12. 



JOVRKAL-1820. 165 

BERKSHIRE AND VICINITY. 

THE KEY. JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (adults 1, children 6) — 7; Communicants, 7. 
UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 2; Communicants, 17; Sunday School Scholars, 15 
to 20. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 2, children 7) — 9; Funerals, 8; Communi- 
cants, 33 ; Sunday School Scholars, from 70 to 80. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

THE REV. GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

The Rev. Mr. Leonard writes there have been some confirmed, 
some additions to the Communicants, two Burials, one Marriage, 
and one Baptism of an Infant. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

ALFRED L. BAURY, LAY READER. 

Baptisms, 37 ; Confirmed, 52 ; Communicants, 65 ; Marriages, 1 ; 
Burials, 4; Sunday School Scholars, from 40 to 50. 

TOTAL. 
Baptisms, 99; Deaths, 85 ; Communicants, 391. 

On motion, of the Rev. Joel Clap, Resolved, That a 
Committee be appointed to revise the Constitution of the 
Church in this Diocese, and report this evening. 

The following gentlemen were appointed such a Commit- 
tee, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stephen 
Beach, Daniel Henshaw, Esq. and Dorastus Wooster, Esq. 

On motion of the Rev. Joel Clap, resolved, That a Com- 
mittee be appointed to devise and report to this Convention 



166 JOURMAL—1820. 

the most efficient method of raising money to repay the 
Hon. and Rev. Dr. Stewart the money he long since ad- 
vanced to procure a Power of Attorney from the Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, and to 
defray the expenses of a suit now pending for the recovery 
of the Lands of that Society in this State. 

The following gentlemen were elected : John Chipman, 
Esq., Mr. Jordan Gray, Clement Trowbridge, Esq., Amherst 
Willoughby, Esq. and Samuel H. Tupper, Esq. 

On motion of the Rev. Stephen Beach, the Convention 
adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Evening Prayer was read by the Rev. Joel Clap, and a 
Sermon was delivered by the Rev. Mr. Baldwin, of Ogdens- 
burgh, N. Y. 

Immediately after the close of the Evening Service, the 
Convention again met. 

On motion voted, That the Hon. Daniel Chipman be 
added to the Committee last appointed. 

The Convention adjourned until to-morrow Morning at 5 
o'clock. 

Thursday, June 29th. The Convention met agreeably to 
adjournment. 

The Rev. Mr. Bronson, in behalf of the Committee 
appointed to revise the Constitution, reported. That it is 
expedient to adopt the following revised Constitution, viz. 

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE CONVENTION OF THE PROTESTANT 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE DIOCESE OF VERMONT. 

Art. I. The various Churches in Vermont shall be con- 
sidered as united in one Convention in subordination to the 
General Convention of the United States. 

Art. II. The said Convention shall meet annually on 
the fourth Wednesday in June, at such place as shall be 
appointed at a previous meeting ; and all Clergymen of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, residing in this State, shall 
be entitled to seats in Convention ; and Lay Delegates from 



J0VBKAL-18W. 167 

the several Churches in this State shall he entitled to seats 
in the said Convention, in the following proportion, to wit : 
Each Church shall have the privilege of sending at least 
one member ; if it consists of ten or more Communicants, 
then it may send two members, and for every twenty-five 
Communicants, excepting the numbers above specified, the 
said Churches shall be entitled to one additional member. 

Art. III. The Convention shall deliberate and act in 
one body ; but shall vote in distinct orders, when any mem- 
ber shall call for such a division on any one question ; and 
in such case a concurrence of a majority of both orders shall 
be necessary to constitute a vote. 

Art. IY. A President, Secretary and Standing Com- 
mittee shall be chosen at every Annual Meeting of the 
Convention ; and when there is to be a Session of the Gen- 
eral Convention witliin the ensuing year, the requisite del- 
egation shall be appointed to represent this State in that 
body ; also as long as this State shall belong to the Eastern 
Diocese, a delegation shall be appointed to attend each 
Diocesan Convention at the next preceding Annual Con- 
vention, or at some meeting specially warned for that 
purpose. Provided, however, that no person shall be a 
Member of the Standing Committee, or shall represent this 
State in the General or Diocesan Convention, unless he be 
a regular Communicant in the Church. Provided, also, 
that when the Bishop of the Diocese shall be present in 
Convention, he shall, ex officio, be President. The Conven- 
tion may from time to time, if deemed expedient, appoint 
a Prudential Committee to superintend the prudential con- 
cerns of the Church. 

Art. V. If at any time a Bishop is to be elected by 
this Convention, the Secretary, by order of the President, 
or Standing Committee, shall write to the Minister or one 
of the Wardens of each Church, at least six weeks before 
the election is to take place, and give notice of the time 



168 JOVRXAL-1820. 

and place appointed for such election, and request, that 
Delegates may attend the Convention for the purpose ; and, 
in every such election, the Convention shall vote in distinct 
orders — the Clerical order shall naake a nomination by bal- 
lot, and a majority of the Lay Delegates shall approve the 
appointment, before the person shall be considered elected. 

Art. VI. No alteration shall be made in this Constitu- 
tion except in Annual Convention ; nor unless proposed and 
reduced to writing at a previous Convention. 

Art. VII. The Bishop or Standing Committee shall 
have power to call a special Convention, by giving six 
weeks previous notice to the Minister or one of the War- 
dens of each particular Church. 

The foregoing Report was accepted, and, on motion of 
Mr. Wooster it was resolved. That the revised Constitution, 
as above reported by the Committee appointed for that 
purpose, be adopted as the Constitution of the Convention 
of the Protestant Ei)iscopal Church in the State of Ver- 
mont. 

The Convention proceeded to the appointment of the 
Standing Committee. The following gentlemen were elect- 
ed, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Stephen 
Beach, the Rev. Joel Clap, the Rev. George Leonard, and 
the Rev. Carlton Chase. 

The following gentlemen were appointed Delegates to 
represent the Church in this State in the Diocesan Conven- 
tion to be holden at Newport, R. I. on the last Wednesday 
of September next, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
the Rev. Stephen Beach, the Rev. George Leonard, and 
the Rev. Joel Clap. — Clement Trowbridge, Esq., Daniel 
Chipman, Esq., Josiah Dunham, Esq. and Mr. Alfred L. 
Baury. 

The Rev. Carlton Chase was appointed as a Substitute 
for any one of the Clerical Delegates, who should be unable 
to attend said Convention. 



JOURJ^AL-1820. 169 

The following gentlemen were appointed Substitutes for 
the Lay Delegates above named, viz. Jeremiah Stratton, 
Dr. Dana Hyde, Col. John Ohipman, Col. Jesse Lull 

Col. John Chipman, in behalf of the Committee appoint- 
ed to devise the most efficient method of raising money to 
repay Dr. Stewart, etc. submitted the following report : 

To THE Convention OF the 

Protestant Episcopal Church now sitting : 

Your Committee appointed to devise and report to the 
Convention the most efficient method of raising money to 
repay the Hon. and Rev. Charles Stewart, D. D. the money 
which he long since advanced to procure a Power of Attor- 
ney from the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 
Foreign Parts, and to raise a sum sufficient to defray the 
expense of a suit now pending for the recovery of the Lands 
of said Society in this State, respectfully report, That the 
several Episcopal Churches and Societies in this State be 
called on to raise each the sums hereafter mentioned as 
soon as may be, and forward the same to Daniel Chipman, 
Esq. — taking his receipt therefor, to wit : 

Arlington, ^20.00 

Sandgate, 8.00 

Manchester, 10.00 

Pawlet and Wells, .... 10.00 

Rutland, ...... 20.00 

Middlebury, 20.00 

Vergennes, 8.00 

Charlotte, 20.00 

Shelburne, 20.00 

Burlington, 8.00 

Fairfield and other towns in 

Franklin County, . . . 30.00 

Guilford, 20.00 

Rockingham, 20.00 

Windsor and Hartland, . . 30.00 

^244.00; 



170 JOUBMAL-1820. 

that, in case there be a recovery in the aforesaid suit, the 
money so advanced, may be repaid with interest out of the 
avails of the Lands thus recovered. 

JOHN CHIPMAN, for Committee. 
Shelburne, June 29, 1820. 

The above Keport was accepted and adopted. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a Prudential 
Committee to superintend the temporalities of the Church 
viz. John Phelps, Esq., Horace Everett, Esq., Col. Jesse 
Gove, Amherst Willoughby, Esq., Hon. Ezra Meach, George 
Cleveland, Esq. 

Voted, that the Prudential Committee be directed to 
procure a written opinion of the Hon. Nathaniel Chipman, 
relative to the suit now pending before the Federal Court 
of the United States for the recovery of the Society Lands, 
so called, in New-Haven for the benefit of the Counsel em- 
ployed in behalf of the Church in said suit. 

Resolved, That the first Canon of the Church in this 
State be repealed, and that the following be adopted instead 
thereof, viz. 

OF THE MODE OF TRYING CLERGYMEN ACCUSED OF MISDE- 
MEANOR. 

Whenever the Standing Committee shall have reason to 
suspect a Clergyman of this Church to be guilty of infidel- 
ity, heresy, vice or irregularity of any kind, it shall be their 
duty to inquire into the circumstances of the case ; and if 
upon investigation they consider the crime worthy of notice, 
they shall report thereupon to the Bishop, who may sum- 
mon a council of the Clergy, not less than three ; a copy of 
the charge, and due notice of the time and place of trial 
being likewise communicated to the party accused ; and 
after a full and fair investigation of the subject, the Bishop 
may pronounce sentence in the case. And if any Minister, 
degraded agreeable to this Canon, shall consider himself 
aggrieved, he shall be allowed an appeal to the House of 
Bishops. 



JOURMAL-1820. 171 

Voted, That the next Annual Meeting of this Convention 
be holden in Iminanuel Church, Bellows Falls. 

The Kev. Joel Clap was appointed to preach the Ser- 
mon at the opening of the next Convention. 
On motion, the Convention adjourned, sine die. 
Attest, J. DUNHAM, Secretary. 

JOEL CLAP, Assistant Secretary. 



The following passages from the address of Bishop Giiswold to 
the Biennial Convention of the Eastern Diocese assembled at New- 
port R. I. Sept. 27. 1820, are here appropriate and important. 

"Reverend Brethren and Respected Friends: 

I address you under some circumstances of peculiar disadvan- 
tage ; and the pleasure of meeting j'ou again, on this interesting occa- 
sion, is mingled with regret, that in the discharge of this duty I 
cannot equal your just expectations. The infirm state of my health, 
during the nine months last past, has necessarily occasioned some 
deficiency in the performance of Episcopal duties. Early in August, 
a tour was commenced with the intention of visiting the northern 
parts of the Diocese; but for particular reasons, respecting the 
Churches in Vermont, I was requested to postpone my visit to that 
State till the next Spring. It is now more than twelve months since 
I have been desirous of visiting the Churches in the eastern parts ; 
but it has been judged expedient to delay this journey also, until the 
new Church, now nearly finished in Gardner, in the State of Maine 
should be ready for consecration." 

" On the Friday next following the day of our last Biennial 
Convention in Greenfield, Joel Clap was ordained Deacon. The 
Sunday after I passed in Guilford, in Vermont. A number of 
people, actuated by a laudable zeal for promoting God's holy wor- 
ship, had erected a neat and very convenient edifice, in which I 
was invited that day to officiate. The congregation was respect- 
able, and very attentive ; and though there were then no Episco- 
palians in that town, a number of the principal people expressed a 
desire to become acquainted with the doctrines and worship of our 
Church ; and invited Mr. Baury, a student in theology, and since 



172 JOURKAL-1820. 

a caadldate for Holy Orders, to perforin Divine Service for a few 
weeks in tlieir church. Mr. Baury, who has continued with them 
to the present time, has devoted himself, with great diUgence and 
pious zeal, to all the duties allowed to those who are not ordained 
to the ministry ; and his labors have been remarkably blessed. " 

" Oq the 18th of November, I was present at the State Conven- 
of Massachusetts, which met in Salem. Confirmation was admin- 
istered ; and the Rev. Calvin Wolcott, Deacon, was admitted to the 
Order of Presbyters. yVnd on the 19th of December following, at 
Bristol, in Rhode Island, Carlton Chase and Patrick H. Folker, 
were ordained Deacons. 

" Early in the next year I again visited Guilford, in Vermont, 
being invited by the proprietors of the new church, and others, 
who had formed themselves into a society: and on the 18th of 
February, 1819, the house, by their unanimous request, was dedi- 
cated, according to the Canons and Usage of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church. Twenty-one persons, including some children, were 
baptized. Thirty-two received confirmation, apparently with a very 
deep sense of the nature and solemnity of the ordinance. The 
next day I preached in the Congregational meeting-house, about 
four miles from the Church, and near the center of the town. 
And on Sunday, the 21st. again ofiiciated in the Church, baptized 
four adults and five children, confirmed eleven more, and adminis- 
tered the Lord's Sapper to forty-two, very devout communicants ; 
of whom about thirty, then for the first time, received that Sacra- 
ment. On no occasion have I ever witnessed more pleasino- evi- 
dence of sincere piety and religious reverence; or felt more 
sensibly the presence and goodness of God, who, in His great 
mercy, as there is reason to believe, was pleased to bless that visi- 
tation to the comfort and edification of His people. In Auo-ust of 
the same year, I made a third visit to that parish : on the 20th 
preached and administered baptism in the meeting-house ; and on 
the 21st preached in the Church, baptized three adults and two 
children, confirmed nine persons, and gave the Communion to about 
forty-five. Another society has, for convenience, been organized in 
that town, and Divine Service is performed alternately in the 
meeting-house, and in the Church : and on every Lord's Day a third 
service is held in the latter place." 



JOURMJ.L-1820. 173 

"At an ordination held in Providence September 2d, 1819, 
Patrick H. Folker and George Taft, Deacons, were admitted to the 
order of Priests : and Addison Searl, Jasper Adams, and Edward 
Lippitt, were ordained Deacons." 

*'From Providence, I proceeded to Boston, and on the fourth 
assisted in the interesting ceremony of laying the corner stone of a 
new Church in that town. The next day, being Sunday, I officia- 
ted in Dedham ; and on Monday proceeded on a tour which 
extended through New Hampshire and a part of Vermont. In the 
course of it, on the 15th, I assisted in the Institution of the Rev. 
James B. Howe into the Parish of Union Church in Claremont, and 
administered Confirmation and the Lord's Supper. The next day 
we had Divine Service and Confirmation in the morning at Cornish : 
and in the afternoon prayers and a sermon at Windsor, in Vermont. 
On the l7th, in Windsor, assisted by my Reverend brethren, 
Abraham Bronson, James B. Howe, George Leonard and Titus 
Strong, I gave Priests Orders to the Reverend Joel Clap, and to 
Rhodolphus Dickenson the order of Deacon. Confirmation was 
administered, and the Communion of course given. The audience 
appeared deeply interested in the solemnities, and I have rarely 
known the services of our Church, of ordination especially, eff"ect, 
in a congregation, a more serious impression. It is sufficient to 
observe, that with some few exceptions, when others perform the 
duty, my general practice is to preach in the Churches visited. 
In this tour I visited sixteen parishes." 

" From January to May of the present year — 1820 — I was visit- 
ed with sickness, and able to perform but few official duties. The 
people of my parish in Bristol, without curtailing the stipend 
allowed me, generously engaged the Rev. Mr. Taft to aid in the 
ministry ; and he still continues my assistant." 

"June the 30th, assisted by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Brownell, of 
Connecticut, and several Clergymen from various parts, I conse- 
crated St. Paul's Church in Boston. The erection of that elegant 
edifice, by the very liberal exertions of a few respectable individ- 
uals ; the chaste style of its architecture ; the particulars of its 
dedication, and the Institution of the Rev. Samuel F. Jarvis, D. D. 
the following week, are things so generally known in the Diocese, 
that it is unnecessary now to repeat them. But it is highly 



174 JOURJfAL-1820. 

fitting and very much our duty to render united and unfeigned 
thanks to the Father of mercies for an acquisition so valuable to 
our Churches, and to our Clerical body." 

" Besides the Institutions already noticed, the Rev. Mr. Ten 
Broeck has been inducted into the parish in Portland ; the Rev. 
Joel Clap into the Church in Shelburne, Vermont ; and the Rev. 
George Leonard into the Church in Cornish, Xew-Hampshire." 

" At an ordination holden in Providence on the 4th of August 
last, the Rev. Jasper Adams and the Rev. Lemuel Burge were 
ordained Presbyters. Also in Bristol, on the 9th day of the 
present month, the Rev. Addison Searle, Deacon, was admitted to 
the order of Priesthood. The whole number ordained Presbyters, 
since you last convened, including the Rev. Mr. Chase this day 
admitted to that holy older, is nine. Eleven have been ordained 
Deacons, three hundred and twenty-four persons have been con- 
firmed : six only have been received as Candidates for holy orders, 
to wit : Alfred L. Baury, Stephen H. Tyng, Henry C. Knight, 
Samuel B. Shaw, Joseph Muenscher and Jordan Gray. The total 
number of Candidates at present on the list is eleven." 

" The Rev. James Nichols, having by his letter, dated at Man- 
chester, in Vermont, July 2d, A. D. 1819, declared his resolution 
to renounce the Ministry of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and 
in future not to exercise any of its functions : in consequence, 
agreeably to the provisions of the 2d Canon of the General Con- 
vention of 1817, he, the said James Nichols, on the 2d day of Sep- 
tember, 1819, in the presence of the Rev. Mr. Crocker and other 
Clergymen, was declared to be, and is suspended from his grade 
of the Ministry in said Church." 

" Since our last Biennial Convention, the district of Maine has 
become a State, and now holds a respectable rank in the union 
which forms this rising empire. It became proper of course, and 
was judged expedient, that the few Churches in this new State 
should form a state Convention. Accordingly a meeting of Dele- 
gates, from the two Churches in Maine, took place in Brunswick, 
on the 3d of May in the present year. They acceded to the 
Constitution of the General Convention and formed a Constitution 
for that State. Their Delegates, sent to the last General Con- 
vention, were received, and their proceedings recognized and 



JO URjYA L-1 82 0. 1 75 

approved ; ami agreeably to their request, they are annexed to 
this Eastern Diocese. Whether any and wliat alteration in our 
Diocesan Constitution may in consequence be necessary,' will 
claim a place in your deliberations." 

"The Church in Maine, though small, is a just subject of 
gratulation and praise. Three years ago we had but about twelve 
Communicants in that district; there are now about one hundred. 
Most laudable have been their efforts and liberality in making 
provision for the decent performance of Divine Worship, and the 
regular administration of the Christian Ordinances. In Gardner 
they have erected a new and very handsome Church, excelling, in 
the purity of taste displayed, and perfection of the Gothic style, 
any edifice perhaps in the United States. If the Lord permit, it 
will soon be solemnly dedicated to His holy worship. The parish 
in Portland are second to none in their pious liberality: 'for to 
their power, — I bear record — yea, and beyond their power they 
are willing,' — and generously endeavour to render the situation 
of their worthy pastor comfortable and happy. I have supposed 
it my dnty to give them some little aid from our Easter contribu- 
tions. They have obtained a bell for their Church. May the 
Lord remember them for good, and visit them with His salvation." 

"The Church in New-Hampshire has not materially changed 
from the state reported at your last Convention. The Rev. 
Daniel Barber has left the Diocese, and also, it is reported, the 
communion of the Protestant Episcopal Church. The Rev. Mr. 
Howe has succeeded him in the Church in Claremont, where his 
labours are much blessed." 

" In no part of this Diocese is the change for the better, during 
the last two years, more apparent, than in Vermont ; though even 
there, but little, we fear of what we ought to do, has been effected . 
Mr. Chase has succeeded Mr. Chapman at Bellows Falls. The 
Church in Shelburne, under the care of Mr. Clap, has very much 
increased. New parishes might easily be formed, had we mission- 
aries to feed them with the Bread of Life, and rear them up to 
strength and maturity. Some promising young men, in that State, 
are now prosecuting their studies, with a view to the sacred minis- 
try. In Manchester a new Church is now in building ; and 
another in Windsor. In February next, it is expected that the 



176 JOVEJ^AL-1820. 

very important law question, respecting their Church Lands will 
be decided." 

" The sums collected at our Easter contributions I have en- 
deavored, with the advice of our Standing Committee, to apply to 
the purposes intended, with the utmost frugality, and according to 
the best of my judgment. This fund is annually diminishing. 
The collections of the present year are from a few churches only, 
and amount to about two hundred and forty dollars. The greater 
part of our Churches have no such contributions. Whether you 
will judge it expedient and just, still to call on those few, seeing 
it is not made, as our Convention recommended, a general thing, 
may be worthy of consideration. The apology, which is usually 
made, for not asking the people to contribute is, that the parishes 
are poor, and their burdens already heavy ; facts which we well 
know, and sensibly feel. But this excuse, as I conceive, is founded 
on a misapprehension of what is required. It is not enjoined upon 
any parish or individual to contribute anything but what can be 
given with convenience, and with a willing mind. It is required 
only that our people may all have a suitable opportunity to give. 
In the poorest parish there may be a few persons who are able, 
and willing, and desirous, to contribute something to this most 
important and charitable object." 

" We know well that among Christians of other denominations, 
handsome collections are made in parishes much poorer than some 
of ours who contribute nothing ; and we know too that many of 
our people contribute to the propagation of the Gospel by other 
sects, who would more gladly give, if, with even less importunity, 
they were called on by the clergy of our own communion. Should 
it by any be said that the sum like to be collected will be so small 
they are ashamed to present it, let such reflect on the impiety 
of thus dishonouring our Divine Master, and neglecting His work, 
through fear of bringing discredit upon ourselves ! Is it thus we 
take His Cross, and bear His reproach ? Permit me, my clerical 
brethi'en, to ask, whether we, are not the chief delinquents in this 
thing ! — we who ought to lead in every measure which will spread 
the faith of the blessed Saviour, and build up His kingdom. Are 
not the people more ready to give for this noble purpose than we 
to ask ? Are we duly mindful of our Lord's command, doing all 
in our power to preach His Gospel to every creature V 



JO VBKA L-1 820. VTl 

" It was resolved by the last General Convention to establish an 
Institution, to be designated, ' The Protestant Episcopal Mission- 
ary Society in the United States, for Foreign and Domestick 
Missions.' This Institution, in my judgment, is much to the 
honour of the General Convention ; and ought, by every Diocese, 
and every friend of our Church, to be encouraged." 

" Let lis also be careful to manifest a spirit of candour, charity, 
and Christian love. The best evidence that we are Christians, is 
our loving those who love our Lord Jesus. We had never surely 
more occasion for the exercise of forbearance. Though we are 
reviled, let us revile not again ; but, as much as lieth in us, live 
peaceably with all men." 

"That He, who alone is able, will give us success; that the 
business of this Convention may be conducted with harmony and 
wisdom ; and our hearts and lives be devoted to the building up 
of the Redeemer's Kingdom, is my humble prayer," Gospel 
Advocate, vol. i, pp. 9 — 18. Boston, Jan. 182L 

It was proposed at this Convention of the Eastern Diocese, in 
1820, so to amend the Constitution, as to admit Maine, and to 
have an Annual Meeting of the Convention to be composed of all 
the Clergy in the Diocese and a Lay Delegate from each Church. 
Gospel Advocate, vol. ii, p. 357. 



In the Fall of this year, the Legislature passed the followinf 
"Act appropriating a sum of money for the purpose therein 
mentioned." 

"Ji! is hereby enacted ly the General Assembly of the State of Ver- 
mont, that the sum of three hundred dollars be, and hereby is 
appropriated for the defence of a suit in favor of the society for the 
propagation of the Gospel in foreign parts against the town of 
New-Haven and William Wheeler, now pending in the Supreme 
Court of the United States, in addition to the monies heretofore 
appropriated, for that purpose ; and the Treasurer of this State is 
hereby directed to pay the same, out of any money in the Treasu- 
ry not otherwise appropriated, to the order of David Edmond of 
Vergennes, in the county of Addison, Agent of the State for the 
defence of said suit. Passed Nov, 16, 1820," Acts of the Legis- 
lature of Vermont 1820, p. 32. 



178 JOUBKAL-1821. 

1821. 

Bellows Falls, June 27th, 1821. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the State of Vermont met according to appointment in 
Immanuel Church Bellows Falls at half past 8 o'clock, a. m. 
Present : 

The Rt. Rev. Alexander V. G-riswold, President. 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
The Rev. George Leonard, 
The Rev. Carlton Chase, 
The Rev. Joel Clap, 
The Rev. Alfred L. Baury. 
The following Delegates presented their Credentials and 
took their seats, viz. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD: 

Dana Hyde, M. D., John Phelps, Esq., 

Guy Bridgeman. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS: 
Alexander Fleming, Esq. 

SANDGATE : 

Mr. Jordan Gray. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE : 

Joshua Isham, Esq. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL : 

Mr. Carolus C. Brainard. 

The Rev. Joel Clap was appointed Secretary. 

On motion by the Rev. George Leonard, Resolved, That 
Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church who may 
be in this vicinity during the Session of this Convention 
who are not members of the same, be invited to seats in 
Convention. 

Agreeably to the above resolution the Rev. Titus Strong, 
Rector of St. James' Church, Greenfield, appeared and took 
his seat. 



JOURKAL-1821. 179 

In conformity to the 45th Canon of the General Conven- 
tion, the following Parochial Keports were presented and 
read, to wit : — 

BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 3 ; Communicants, 92. 
ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 1 ; Marriages, 1 ; Communicants, 52. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

THE REV. CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 10 ; Marriages, 4 ; Deaths, 4 ; Communicants, 20. 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

THE REV. GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 7; Marriages, 3; Burials, 5; Communicants, from 
35 to 40. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

THE REV. GEORGE LEONARD, MINISTER. 

Baptisms 9 ; Marriages, 1 ; Confirmed, 34 ; Communicants, 50. 
TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 7; Burials, 5; Communicants, 66; Sunday School 
Scholars, 20. This Church has suffered a great loss the last year 
in the death of Mr. Anson Bradley. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms 7 ; Marriages 1 ; Funerals 2 ; Communicants, 51 ; 
Sunday School Scholars, 15. 



180 JOURJ^J.L-1821. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 3 ; Funerals, 1 ; Confirmed, 4 ; Communicants, 17. 
TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 2, infants 11) — 13 ; Funerals, 3 ; Communi- 
cants, 40. 

BERKSHIRE. 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (adults 12, infants 7) — 19 ; Marriages, 1 ; Communi- 
cants, 39. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY, 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (adults 4, infants 5) — 9 ; Communicants, 24. 
CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

THE REV. ALFRED L. BAURY, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 14 : Marriages, 2 ; Funerals, 4 ; Communicants, 75 ; 
Sunday School Scholars, from 50 to 60. 

SANDGATE. 

MR. JORDAN GRAY, LAY READER. 

Baptisms, 2 ; Burials, 5 ; Communicants, 28. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Churches reported, 13; Baptisms, 101; Marriages, 14; 
Burials, 32; Communicants, 592. 

Mr. Jeremiah Stratton, Zion Church, Manchester, and 
Noble Hard, Bethel Church, Arlington, presented their 
Credentials and were admitted to seats in the Convention. 

The Kecord of the Proceedings of the last Convention 
was then read. 



J0VRKAL-189A. 181 

On motion, resolved, That this Convention now proceed 
to the choice of a Standing Committee. The following gen- 
tlemen were duly elected, viz. The Eev. George Leonard, 
the Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Carlton Chase, the 
Rev. Joel Clap. 

The following gentlemen were elected Delegates to the 
Diocesan Convention for the year ensuing, viz. The Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Carlton Chase, the Rev. Ste- 
phen Beach, and the Rev. Joel Clap — Clerical. George 
Cleveland, Esq., Joshua Isham, Esq., Dana Hyde, M. D. 
and Alexander Fleming, Esq. — Lay. 

The following Deputies to the General Convention were 
duly chosen, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. 
George Leonard, the Rev. Carlton Chase, and the Rev. Joel 
Clap — Clerical. The Hon. J. H. Hubbard, Joshua Isham, 
Esq., Clement Trowbridge, Esq. and Alexander Fleming, 
Esq. — Lay. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Bronson, resolved. That in 
case either or any of the above mentioned Delegates or 
Deputies should not be able to attend the Conventions to 
which they are chosen, they shall have power to appoint 
Substitutes, subject to the Constitutional provision. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a Prudential 
Committee for the year ensuing, viz. The Rev. Abraham 
Bronson, John Phelps, Esq., Hon. J. H. Hubbard, Hon. 
Daniel Chipman and George Cleveland, Esq. 

Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to take into 
consideration the expediency of establishing a Missionary 
Society in this State. The following gentlemen were ap- 
pointed said Committee, viz. The Rev. George Leonard, 
the Rev. Carlton Chase, the Rev. Alfred L. Baury, Dana 
Hyde, M. D., Joshua Isham, Esq. 

On motion, resolved. That a Committee consisting of 
three Clergymen and two Laymen, be appointed to consult 
with the Rt. Rev. the Bishop, and report this evening 
whether any, and if any, what measures, it is expedient to 



182 JOUBJ^AL-1821. 

adopt relative to the discipline of the Church. Whereupon 
the following Committee was appointed, viz. The Rev. 
George Leonard, the Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. Joel 
Clap, Mr. Guy Bridgeman and Mr. Noble Hard. 

Resolvedj That this Convention will attend Divine Ser- 
vice this Evening at 4 o'clock. 

The Convention then adjourned for the purpose of attend- 
ing Divine Service. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. Joel Clap. An 
appropriate Sermon was delivered by the Right Reverend, 
the Bishop, who, also, administered the Holy Communion. 
The Convention then proceeded to business. 

Martin Robberts, Esq., a Delegate from Zion Church 
Manchester, presented his Credentials and took his seat 
in Convention. 

The Convention adjourned until 3 o'clock P. M. 

Three o'clock, p. m. The Convention met pursuant to 
adjournment. 

The Rev. George Leonard on behalf of the Committee 
appointed to consult with the Rt. Rev. the Bishop and re- 
port this evening whether any, and if any, what measures, 
it is expedient to adopt relative to the ditrcipline of the 
Church ; made the following report : 

Your Committee have not found it expedient, at this 
time, to recommend any measures to be adopted relative to 
the discipline of the Church, and beg to be excused from 
any further consideration of the subject. 

The Report was accepted and the Committee discharged. 

The Committee appointed to take into consideration the 
expediency of establishing a Missionary Society in this Dio- 
cese made the following report : — 
To THE Convention OF the 

Protestant Episcopal Church now sitting : 

The Committee to whom was referred the question of the 
expediency of establishing a Missionary Society in this 



J0TJRKAL-18^L 183 

Diocese, beg leave to report, That it is their unanimous 
opinion measures should be taken, before the rising of this 
Convention, to effect an object so desirable. 

ALFRED L. BAURY, Chairman. 
Bellows Falls, June 27. 1821. 

The foregoing report was accepted, and, on motion, the 
following gentlemen were appointed a Committee to draw 
up a Constitution of a Missionary Society, viz. The Rev, 
George Leonard, the Rev. Alfred L. Baury and Joshua 
Isham, Esq. 

The Convention adjourned for the purpose of attending 
Divine Service. 

Evening Prayer was read by the Rev. Titus Strong, 
Rector of St. James' Church, Greenfield, Mass., and a 
Sermon was delivered by the Rev, Mr. Baldwin of the 
Diocese of New York. 

Immediately after Service, the Convention proceeded to 
business. 

The Committee, appointed to draw up a Constitution for 
the Missionary Society, reported the following form : 

CONSTITUTION 

OF THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
IN VERMONT. 

Art. L This society shall be known by the name of the 
Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
Vermont. 

Art. II. There shall be an Annual Meeting of this 
Society on the day following the stated annual meeting of 
the Convention of Vermont at the place where the said 
Convention is held. 

Art. III. The Officers of this Society shall be a Pres- 
ident, two Vice Presidents, a Secretary, a Treasurer and a 
Board of Managers to consist of three, to be chosen at the 
Annual Meeting of the Society. 



184 JOUEMJ.L-1821. 

Art. IV. It shall be the duty of the President to pre- 
side in the Society, and to call Special Meetings of the 
same at the request of the Board of Managers. 

Art. V. The Vice Presidents, by seniority, shall, in the 
absence, or at the request of the President perform the 
duties of President. 

Art. VI. The Secretary shall keep the Kecords of the 
Society and conduct the necessary correspondence. 

Art. VII. The Treasurer shall receive and account for 
all monies, and pay them over by order of the Board of 
Managers. 

Art. VIII. The Board of Managers, under the direction 
of the Bishop, shall appoint Missionaries, and superintend 
their missionary labours, and authorize them to receive such 
compensation for their services as may be deemed adequate. 

Art. IX. Persons shall be appointed in the various 
sections of the State to solicit such aid for the support of 
Missionaries as the pious and charitable may be disposed 
to contribute, and transmit the same to the Treasurer 
together with the names of the contributors. 

Art. X. Each person whose subscription may amount 
to one Dollar annually shall be considered a Member of this 
Society. Ten Dollars shall entitle a subscriber to Member- 
ship for Life. 

Art. XI. This Constitution may be altered, or amend- 
ed by a vote of two thirds of the attending Members of 
the Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the 
State of Vermont. 

Art. XII. The Members attending shall always con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 

This Report was accepted, and the Constitution of the 
Missionary Society, as above written, was adopted by the 
Convention. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention be returned 



JOUBJfAL-1821. 185 

to the Rt. Rev. the Bishop of the Eastern Diocese for his 
services in presiding over its present Session, and, also, for 
his excellent Sermon this day delivered before the same. 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Convention be returned 
to the Rev, Mr. Baldwin for his Sermon this day delivered. 

On motion resolved. That the Constitution of the Mis- 
sionary Society be printed, accompanied with a suitable 
Address. 

Resolved, That the Rev. George Leonard be requested to 
prepare an Address to be printed with the Constitution of 
the Missionary Society, and that he be requested to super- 
intend the printing of the same. 

Resolved, That this Convention understand with satis- 
faction that a publication ha's been commenced in the East- 
ern Diocese under the name of the Gospel Advocate, which 
appears calculated to promote the interests of Religion and 
the Chuich, and do recommend to the friends of the Church 
in this State to use their influence to promote its circulation. 

Resolved, That the next Annual Convention of this Dio- 
cese be holden in Zion Church, Manchester. 

The Rev. Joel Clap was appointed to preach the Sermon 
at the opening of the next Convention : The Rev. Carlton 
Chase was appointed his substitute. 

The Convention adjourned, without day. 

Attest, JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



In the Summer of 1821, Bishop Griswold visited the Churches 
of Vermont. The following passages from his Address to the 
Convention of the Eastern Diocese at Portsmouth, N. H. in 182 2 
are the official record of that Visitation, and properly belong to 
the foregoing Journal. 

"On the 28th of May, 1821, I commenced a long journey, in 
which were visited the Churches in Vermont, and in the western 
parts of Massachusetts and New-Hampshire." 



186 JOURJfJ.L-1821. 

" In Bennington, Vermont, I preached ; but such is the preju- 
dice aci-ainst the Episcopal Church, in that part of. the State, that 
no preaching of its ministers among them is likely at present to 
have much good effect. From one respectable family, attached to 
its worship and interests, I experienced, as on several former occa- 
sions, very much kindness and hospitality. " 

'' In Arlington, the Church continues to profit by the zealous 
labours of its pious pastor. " 

" In Sandgate, a town adjoining, a few Episcopalians have organ- 
ized a parish, with not unfavorable prospects. The parish in Man- 
chester has built a Church, and is in a flourishing condition. " 

" It was no small comfort to find in Rutland, a few names, yet 
steadfast, under all their discouragements, and very desirous that a 
Missionary should be sent them. Painful are a parent's feelings, 
when his children ask for bread, iind he has none to give them. 
May God in His mercy open our hearts and fill our hands to con- 
tribute to their relief. " 

" The parish in Middlebury continues very much as it has been 
for years past, faint, yet pursuing ; suffering much under the depri- 
vation of Christian ordinances ; wishing, and asking, and striving, 
to obtain a minister ; but remaining destitute. In Vergennes, on 
the contrary, they seem to have relinquished all effort, and to have 
abandoned the Church in despair. Yet I met there a serious and 
very attentive congregation ; and even yet, the labors of a faithful 
Missionary would probably be blessed among them. " 

" In Shelburne, the state and prospects are happily xevj differ- 
ent. Through the blessing of God, we succeeded in finding a 
Clergyman to labor there, and his labors have been greatly blessed. 
The little Society, which, two years before, contained but eight or 
ten families, was now increased to a respectable congregation. I 
preached in Burlington, and was much obliged by polite atten- 
tions there received. " 

" By setting off from Burlington at an early hour, and hard 
travelling in heavy roads, we arrived in St. Albans, in season for 
services in the afternoon. In the evening again we had Prayers 
and a Sermon. A pious, active Missionary, stationed in that place, 
and officiating alternately there, and at Swanton, might apparently 
labour to much profit. The Churches in Sheldon and Fairfield 



JOURJfAL-1821. 187" 

were likewise in a thrivinjr slate. But an unhappy state of things 
commenced about that time, and still continues. Some reports 
and accusations, affecting the moral character of their Rector, have 
rendered a discontinuance of his labours expedient, till the cause 
shall have a canonical investigation. " 

"On the 15th" of June, '' I visited anew parish in Berkshire, 
and was highly gratified in finding there much piety and zeal, and 
attachment to the Episcopal Church. Its friends were then mak- 
ing preparation for erecting a House of Prayer ; manifested a will" 
iugncss, to the utmost of their abilities, to procure and supoort an 
Apostolic ministration of the Christian Ordinances. The services 
of that day were unusually interesting and impressive. There be- 
ing no building sufficiently capacious to contain the congregation 
expected, with the timber collected for the new Church, on a beau- 
tiful rising ground, where it is to be erected, shaded bv a small 
and very pleasant grove of sugar maples, the people prepared seats 
and other accommodations for Divine Service. Our Altar was built 
as it were ivith unhewn stones; we consecrated those materials by 
anticipating their use. The thought that they were to be fitly 
joined together, in one beautiful temple, dedicated to God, natu- 
rally caused the very interesting and serious reflections, that the 
congregation present were, or ought to be, materials in preparation 
'as lively stones,' to be ' a spiritual house,' a 'building not made 
with hands, eternal in the heavens.' Many circumstances conspired 
to heighten the interest of the scene and the occasion, and make ira" 
pressions upon a serious mind not soon to be forgotten. Surveying 
the one, and reflecting upon the other; beholding a large assembly, 
collected from many miles of the country around, waiting, like 
Cornelius and his friends, and seeming to say, 'we are all here 
present before God, to hear all things that are commanded thee of 
God,' with the additional consideration, that their immortal well- 
being might, in some degree, depend on my knowledge and fidel- 
ity, feelings were excited, which language cannot easily express. On 
such occasions, and to the preacher of the Gospel similar occasions 
often recur, well may we exclaim 'who is sufficient for these things !' 
It is among the wonderful counsels of God's unerring wisdom, that 
His strength should be manifest in weakness ; that such a 'treasure' 
as the Gospel Ministry should be given us * in earthern vessels :' 



188 JOURJ^J.L-1821. 

that sinful creatures, themselves ' scarcely saved, ' and some of 
them, we may well fear, not saved, should be made the instru- 
meuts of saving others. Divine wisdom, however, is sure to adapt 
the means to the end ; and in the hands of omnipotence, any 
means are effectual. The Lord ' can satisfy men with bread ' in 
the most dreary wilderness. What seems to us impossible, with 
Him, is without difficulty : by the foolishness of preaching. He can 
save them that believe." 

I was assisted in the services by my Keverend Brethren Leon- 
ard and Clap, who, to my great comfort, and no small assistance, 
accompanied me more than two hundred miles of this journey. 
After the second Lesson, seven young persons, with the appear- 
ance of much piety and sincere devotion, presented themselves to 
be baptized. The Sermon was heard with attention worthy of a 
better discourse; and, it being ended, thirty-five persons received 
Confirmation ; and they received it, there was good reason to be- 
lieve, with a just and deep sense of its nature and design. And 
finally, the Lord's Supper was administered to a respectable num- 
ber of Communicants, " 

" The next morning, we proceeded to Montgomery, where we 
had the pleasure of meeting with another newly formed Society, 
and where the services were very similar, and not less interesting. 
The tears of many, evinced how much awakened was their sense 
that the Lord is good, and they sinners. " 

" Montgomery is a town but recently settled. The Rev. Mr. 
Clap, yet a young man, was the first child ( savages excepted ) 
born within its limits. The soil in that part of the State is rich 
and productive, and the country rapidly rising into importance. A 
new stage road, from Boston to Montreal, was expected soon to 
pass through Montgomery and Berkshire ; which, with their vicin- 
ity to Lake Champlain, and easy access to a good and sure market 
for their abundant and valuable productions, must render that, at 
no distant period, a wealthy part of the State. But to the pious 
mind, it is far more pleasing to find them increasing in 'the true 
riches.' I have been in no place, where there appeared a more 
serious and awakened desire to know and do the will of God ; nor 
where the people are so generally disposed to receive the doctrines 
of the Church, and to delight in its worship. In no part of this 



JOUBMAL-1821. 189 

Diocese, and I verily believe, ia no part of the United States, can 
our Missionaries labour more profitably, than in Franklin County, 
and some of the towns adjoining, eastward. Our young Clergy- 
men, whose circumstances will reasonably admit of it, who desire 
to do good in the service of their Divine Master, rather than to 
honor themselves, and live at ease, can no where bestow their 
labours more profitably than in the northwest part of Vermont. " 

" Montgomery was the farthest extent of my tour in that direc- 
tion. In the afternoon of the same day we returned back through 
Berkshire to Sheldon. The next day, Trinity Sunday, we spent in 
Fairfield, where I preached but twice; so long were our services, 
and so far from their homes were the most of the people, that a 
third service was not convenient. It was pleasing,, and an evi- 
dence of their sincere desire to hear the Word, and receive the 
Ordinances of Christ, to observe the distance which the people, 
in that and other parts of Vermont, will travel, and many of them 
walk, to attend publick worship, and share in the ministrations of 
the Sanctuary. How unfaithful and without excuse would be 
the Stewards of God's mysteries — the Pastors of His Fold — if 
they who hunger and thirst after righteousness, should ever, 
unnecessarily, be sent empty away ! Such zeal in the people, 
was felt as a strong, though silent reproof of my own remissness 
in the Saviour's cause." 

"On the morning of the 18th, we took our leave of kind and 
much beloved friends, and shaped our course for crossing the 
mountain to the eastern side of the State, by a route which I had 
never before taken. In Richmond, we were joined by a respecta- 
ble gentleman, a Lay Delegate from Shelburne, who, in company 
with his daughter, was on his way to the Convention ; — an acqui- 
sition to our little company, which rendered the journey more 
pleasant." 

" On the 20th, we reached Randolph, where we were received 
with much politeness, and were entertained by a gentleman of 
high respectability. The Church has some valuable friends, 
though no parish in that town. Being in a very friendly manner 
invited by the Congregational Minister and others of his society, 
we had Divine Service and a Sei'mon in their meeting-house. 
There, too, I had the pleasure of becoming acquainted with a 



190 JOVRKAL-1821. 

worthy Presbyterian minister, and a part of his interesting family. 
One or two of his sons are pursuing studies with a view to Holy 
Orders." 

'•The next day, for the first time, I had the pleasure of meeting 
with a respectable number of Episcopalians, in Bethel, who have 
been too much neglected. I had not, before that visit, supposed 
that the number of those attached, or at least, favourable, to our 
Communion in that place, was so considerable. Though the 
rains fell abundantly, a large congregation assembled, and ap- 
peared to be much interested in all the services. The number 
confirmed was much greater tlian I had expected. They appeared 
to be thankful for the Sermon, and refreshed by the visitation ; 
and it was a subject of no small regret, to myself certainly, that 
previous appointments at Windsor and other places, made it 
necessary to leave them soon and pursue our journey." 

" The parish in Windsor continues to merit the ' praise of all 
the Churches.' They were building a new and elegant house for 
Divine service, which is now nearly finished, and is soon to be 
consecrated. Considering that the parish is but small, their pious 
liberality, prudent conduct, and united zeal in this noble work, 
are deserving of the highest praise. Long may the house remain 
to them and their children, through remote generations, a happy- 
Bethel." 

" On the morning of the 23d, we crossed the Connecticut River 
into New-Hampshire, and had services in Cornish. There I first 
learned, that the parish in Claremont, having enlarged their old 
Church, and put it in complete repair, requested that it might, 
that day, be consecrated. With some little difficulty, and the 
utmost diligence in making the best use of our scanty time, this 
was done in the afternoon. The services being ended, we pro- 
ceeded three miles farther to the village, where the parish have 
purchased and put in good repair, a large, new, and convenient 
Church. In it, was a handsome pair of chandeliers, generously 
presented to the Church by a gentleman in Boston." 

*' Our Services the next day — Sunday the 24th, being also, St. 
John's day — were well attended. In consequence of a polite 
invitation, our third services were held in the Congregational 



JOURJ^AL-18^1. 191 

Meeting House. At Drewsvlllc, the next day, the congregation 
was small, and the people appeared to be discouraged." 

"On Wednesday, the 27th" of June, "I met with the Conven- 
tion of Vermont, at Bellows Falls. It was well attended : so 
many Clergymen of our order had never before been together in 
that State. After the exercises usual on such occasions, the 
business of the Convention was conducted and finished with great 
unanimity, and much to the satisfaction of the members. Nothing 
was transacted of more importance, than the forming of a Mis- 
sionary Society, which it is hoped may prove to be highly 
beneficial." 

"By travelling expeditiously, we reached Guilford in season 
for services in the Meeting House on the 2Sth. In the morning 
of the day following, we met in the Church, distant four miles; 
and in the afternoon pursued our journey to Greenfield. And 
thus was finished the tour through Vermont, having, in the course 
of it, visited every Church or Episcopal Society in the State. 
Those of Sandgate met us in Arlington ; and the few of our 
Communion in Pawlet and Wells have the benefit of the visit- 
ations of the Bishop of New- York. In every parish I preached 
once ; in several twice ; and in some three times. And in almost 
every one, I confirmed and gave the Communion. In this jour- 
ney, which almost compassed the whole State, I noticed, with 
awakened attention and great pleasure, much improvement, which, 
in the last few years, has taken place. There appears certainly 
to be an increasing respect for the doctrines of Christ and the 
worship of God. Pious, regular, orthodox, and well educated 
Ministers of the Gospel are more respected, and better received ; 
and those of a contrary character, less countenanced and supported. 
This, as we may of course suppose, is attended with improvement 
in morals ; and accordingly there appears less idleness and dissi- 
pation ; and the consumption of ardent spirits is evidently dimin- 
ished. In agriculture, more neatness, order, and industry are 
visible. ' Godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise 
of the life that now is.' What reason and the Word of God 
teach, does experience confirm, that a due regard for religious 
institutions, and especially for the regular and decent worship of 
Almighty God, is productive, not of good morals only, but of 
good economy, and of all the blessings of civil and social life." 



192 J0UBJ{AL-1821. 

"Sumlay, the 14th of October, I passed in Claremont ; preached 
three times to very large and unusually attentive congregations, 
and administered baptism and confirmation. In the eleven years 
of mv ministry in this office, I have held confirmation in Clare- 
mont nine times, and have administered the rite in that parish 
to two hundred and sixty-seven persons. In no place, perhaps, 
are the Ministers of Christ more cordially received ; nor treated 
with affection more truly Christian." 

" On my way into Vermont, I preached at Bellows Falls ; on 
the evening of the 16th, arrived at Manchester ; and on the 17th, 
assisted by my Reverend Brethren, Bronson, Beach, Chase, Hum- 
phrey, and Baury, consecrated the new Church in Manchester, 
called ' Zion Church.' The house was much crowded through all 
the services, by people, who listened as those who have ' ears to 
hear.' They remained during the Communion Service ; and, 
with the exception of one denomination, all the Communicants 
of various Churches present, including several Congregational 
Ministers, received with us the Lord's Supper. It seemed as a 
pleasing foretaste of that happy time, when 'all the faithful people 
of God' shall unite in His adoration and praise. May ' His king- 
dom come;' and that we may be prepared for its unspeakable 
joys, ' His will be done on earth as it is in heaven.' " 

•'Zion Church is neat and commodious; and though small, its 
erection was a noble work for a still smaller parish. On this oc- 
casion, my thoughts were led to some serious reflections, whether 
it might not be chiefly my own fault that of the Churches in this 
Diocese, the most inconvenient and least worthy of the abilities 
and generous spirit of those who worsljip in it, is that of my own 
parish in Bristol." 

" On the 18th, we had services in Arlington, where a few were 
confirmed ; and Jordan Gray was admitted to the Order of 
Deacons. On my way from thence to the General Convention in 
Philadelphia, I had leisure to remain a few days in Troy, in the 
Diocese of New-York ; which, both on account of my then declin- 
ing health, and the politeness and very kind attentions I there 
received, proved a providential blessing." Gospel Advocate, vol. 
ii, pp. 330—340. Boston, Nov. 1822. 



JOUBJfAL-1822. 193 

1822. 

Manchester, June 26tb, 1822. 

This being the clay prescribed by the Constitution of the 
Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont for the Annual Meeting of said Conven- 
tion, a number of the Clergy and Lay Delegates from 
several Churches in the State assembled in Zion Church, 
Manchester, at nine o'clock, a. m. 

The following Clergymen and Delegates were present : 
The Kev. Abraham Bronson, The Rev. Joel Clap, 
The Rev. Stephen Beach, The Rev. Carlton Chase, 
The Rev, George Leonard, The Rev. Jordan Gray. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 

Mr. Jeremiah Stratton, Mr. Truman Purdy, 
Mr. William Benedict. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD: 

Dana Hyde, M. D. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Mr. Carolus C. Brainard. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD; 

Mr. Nathan Lobdell, Mr. Abijah Hawley. 

' GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 

Mr. Charles B. Wesson. 

MIDDLEBURY : 

Mv. George Cleveland. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE: 

Mr. Joshua Isham. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS : 

Mr. George Caldwell. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALMNS: 

Mr. Samuel A. Wilkins. 

BETHEL CHURCH. ARLINGTON: 

Mr. Moses Hard, Martin C. Deming, 

Anson Canfield. 



194 JOURJfAL-1822. 

The Kev. Abraham Bronson was appointed President, 
and the Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

The following Parochial Reports were then presented and 
read, viz. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 4 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 5 ; Communicants, 57. 
BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

THE REV. ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 3; Marriages, 1; Funerals, 3; Communicants, 87. 

These parishes, on the whole remain much as usual, though 
deaths and removals, together with one suspension from each 
Church, have somewhat lessened the number of Communicants. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 4 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 4 ; Communicants, 70. 
GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

THE KEV. STEPHEN BEACH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 5 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 2 ; Communicants, 47. 
UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

THE REV. STEPHEN BEACH, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 2; Funerals, 1; Communicants, 18. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

THE EEV. GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (in St. Paul's Church 6, one in Bethel) — 7; 
Marriages, 3 ; Burials, 4 ; Communicants, 35. 



JO UBKAL-1 822. 1 95 

IMMANUEL CnURCn, BELLOWS FALLS. 

THE REV. CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 5 ; Burials, 2 ; Marriages, 1 ; Communicants, 25. 

It may be proper to mention, that during the past year the 
Parish has been favored with a bequest of one thousand dol- 
lars, by a Lady lately deceased in the City of Kew York. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

THE REV. JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 9, children 8) — 17 ; Funerals, 3 ; Marriages, 2 ; 
Communicants, 47 ; Families, 56. 

BERKSHIRE. 

THE REV. JORDAN GRAY, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 5 ; Marriages, 2 ; Burials, I ; Communicants, 28 ; 
Families, 16. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

THE REV. JORDAN GRAY, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 7 ; Burials, 2 ; Communicants, 27 ; Families, 14. 
ENOSBURGH. 

THE REV. JORDAN GRAY, MINISTER. 

Communicants, 11; Families, 6. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

THE REV. ALFRED L. BAURY, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 6 ; Marriages, 3 ; Burials, 5 ; Communicants, 75. 

MIDDLEBURY. 
Baptisms, 8 ; Marriages, 2 ; Communicants, 30. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

MR. CAROLUS C. BRAINARD, LAY READER. 

Service has been performed in this Church regularly since the 
sitting of the last Convention by Lay Reading, and the attention 
and rubrical responses given by the congregation show the ardour 



196 J0UB:N'J.L-1822. 

and seriousness of their attachment to the primitive and Scriptural 
faith of our Apostolic Church. Our little society has been 
favoured with but two days preaching the year past, nor has the 
Communion been administered but once ; yet our faith and num- 
bers increase, and most earnestly do we pray the Lord of the 
harvest to send forth among us a faithful Labourer. 

During intermissions on Sunday much pains has been taken to 
instruct children and youth to the number of about twenty in the 
Common Prayer and Bible, with a degree of success that reflects 
much honour on said youth for their unwearied diligence and 
perseverance in attending upon the instructions of their Catechist. 

The number of Communicants is forty-two. There are seven 
candidates for Baptism. 

Considering the sickening aspect of this Society in a spiritual 
point of view at the time of the re-organization of this Church in 
April 1S21, and the very little Clerical aid they have received, 
strangers as they were to each other and in many instances stran- 
gers to true religion and the Church, we have great reason, and 
it is our bounden duty to return humble and hearty thanks to the 
great Head of the Church for granting in so special a manner 
the continual dew of His blessing to this insulated branch of His 
Catholic Church. It may be proper to remark that during the 
winter past service has not been performed in consequence of the 
absence of the Reader. This Church and society are able and 
willing to advance one hundred dollars annually for the support 
of a Clergyman among them any part of the time. 

The Convention adjourned for the purpose of attending 
Divine Service. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. George Leonard, 
and a discourse was delivered by the Rev. Joel Clap. The 
Holy Communion was administered by the Rev. Carlton 
Chase, assisted by the Rev. Jordan Gray. 

Public services being ended, the Convention proceeded to 
business. 

On motion, the Convention adjourned till 3 o'clock, p. m. 

Three o'clock, p. m. The Convention met according to 
adjournment. 



J0UBJ{AL-1822. 197 

On motion by the Kev. Carlton Chase, the Convention 
proceeded to election of Standing Committee by ballot. 

Voted, That the Standing Committee shall consist of 
four Members. 

The following gentlemen were duly elected the Standing 
Committee. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. George 
Leonard, the Rev. Carlton Chase and the Rev. Joel Clap. 

On motion by the Rev. Stephen Beach, the Convention 
proceeded to the choice of a Prudential Committee. The 
following gentlemen were chosen. Hon. Daniel Chipman, 
George Cleveland, Esq., Hon. Jonathan H, Hubbard. 

On motion, by the Rev. Jordan Gray, the Convention 
proceeded to the appointment of Deputies to the General 
Convention, The following Clerical and Lay Deputies were 
duly chosen, viz. The Rev. Abraham Bronson, the Rev. 
George Leonard, the Rev. Carlton Chase, the Rev. Joel 
Clap, Joshua Isham, Esq., George Cleveland, Esq., Elisha 
Sheldon, M. D. and Mr. Alexander Fleming. 

The Convention proceeded to the appointment of Dele- 
gates to the Diocesan Convention. The following Clerical 
and Lay Delegates were duly appointed, viz. The Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, the Rev. George Leonard, the Rev. Joel 
Clap, the Rev. Stephen Beach, Mr. Samuel A. Wilkins, 
William Barber, Esq., Richard D. Parker, Esq. and Mr. 
John Bellendy. 

On motion by the Rev. Carlton Chase, resolved. That in 
case any or either of the Delegates appointed by this Con- 
vention to attend the General and Diocesan Conventions 
should not find it convenient to fulfil their appointment 
they shall have power to choose Substitutes, subject to the 
constitutional provision. 

The following communication from the Secretary of the 
General Convention was read : 

"At a meeting of the General Convention of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, 



198 JOURJfAL-1822. 

held in the City of Philadelphia in the month of May, 1820, 
Kesolved, That it be made known to the several State Con- 
ventions of the Church, that it is proposed to consider at 
the next General Convention, and if deemed expedient, 
finally to ratify, the following alteration of the first Article 
of the Constitution — by striking out so much of the first 
Article as relates to the time of holding the G-eneral Con- 
vention, and by inserting after the words, ' United States of 
Anerica' in the said article the words, ' at such time in every 
third year,' and by inserting after the word 'Convention' 
the following clause — 'and in case there shall be an epidemic 
disease or any other good cause to render it necessary to 
alter the place fixed for any such meeting of the Conven- 
tion, that the Presiding Bishop shall have it in his power 
to appoint another convenient place, as near as may be to 
the place so fixed on, for holding such Convention.' " 
Extract from the Journal of the General Convention. 

ASHBEL BALDWIN, Secretary 
of the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies." 

On motion, resolved. That this Convention does not 
approve of the foregoing proposed amendment. 

The Rev, Abraham Bronson was nominated by the Con- 
vention as a Trustee of the General Theological Seminary 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of 
America, agreeably to the provision of the third Article of 
the Constitution of the aforesaid Seminary. 

On motion by the Rev. Stephen Beach, the Convention 
adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Evening Prayer was read by the Rev. Jordan Gray, and 
a Sermon was preached bj' the Rev. Carlton Chase. 

After the conclusion of Service, the Convention again met 
for business. 

On motion, resolved. That the Clergy of this State be 
requested to preach on the subject of Domestic Missions, in 
their respective Churches and to solicit contributions once 



JOURJ{AL-1822. 199 

or more in the year, for the benefit of the funds of the 
Protestant Episcopal Missionary Society of this State. 

Resolved, That the Clergy of this Church be requested 
to perform similar services in the several vacant Parishes m 
this State, 

On motion, resolved. That the Pcv. Carlton Chase and 
the Rev. Joel Clap be a Committee to make an Abstract 
of the proceedings of the Convention of this State for the 
three years last past, and to superintend the printing of the 
same, together with the Constitution and Canons of the 
Church in this State. 

On motion voted, That the next Annual Meeting of this 
Convention be held at St. Albans, except it shall be reason- 
ably ascertained that the Church now building in Berkshire 
will not be consecrated about the time of said Meetmg, in 
which case the President shall have it in his power to ap- 
point it at Middlebury by giving timely notice of the same 
to the several Churches in the State. 

The Convention adjourned until 5 o'clock to-morrow 
morning. 

Thursday June 27th, 5 o'clock, a. m. The Convention 
met pursuant to adjournment. 

The Rev. Carlton Chase was appointed to preach the 
Sermon at the opening of the next Convention, and the 
Rev. George Leonard as his substitute. 

The Convention adjourned, sine die. 

Attest, JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



Some portions of the Address of Bishop Griswold to the Con- 
vention of the Eastern Diocese assembled at Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire September 25, 1802, of a general and statistical charac- 
ter are here subjoined as properly forming a part of the Journal of 
this Diocese for that year. The major part of what in this Address 
related to Vermont was for reasons given put into the Journal of 
last year, 



200 JOUBKAL-1822. 

" Rev. Brethren and Friends, 

highly and justly esteemed : 
Through the indulgence of a kind Providence, we are here 
assembled as watchmen in Zion, and constituted guardians of 
that portion of God's Vineyard committed to our care ; to con- 
sult respecting its interests ; and, as the Lord shall give us means 
and wisdom, to promote its prosperity. It is necessary, to the 
good result of our deliberations, to know the state and wants of 
our Churches ; and it is my duty to make to you a report of my 
official transactions during the last two years ; and to add such 
remarks and suggest such measures as may seem just and ex- 
pedient." 

"On the 18th of October 1821, the new, commodious, and very 
beautiful edifice, called Christ Church, Gardner, was dedicated to the 
worship of Almighty God. The Morning Service was performed by 
the Rev. Mr. Morss ; and the Rev. Dr. Jarvis delivered an appro- 
priate Discourse. On the 19th was a Confirmation and other servi- 
ces. My intention is with the Divine permission, again to visit 
those two Churches in Maine, immediately after the adjournment 
of the present Convention. It is decidedly my opinion, that the 
spiritual interest and prosperity of our Churches require that every 
parish should be annually visited by its Diocesan : but the very limi- 
ted and scanty funds of this Diocese, and the extent of country 
over which our few Churches are scattered, render such frequent 
visitations, at present, impracticable. My intention is, and with 
few exceptions, my practice has been, to visit all the parishes at 
least once in two years ; and a large proportion of them twice, or 
oftener. It requires no great wisdom to foresee, what experience 
will probably soon verify ; that our present practice of making a 
State, however large, but one Diocese may be very pernicious to 
the cause of true godliness, and the best interest of the Churches. 
Thirty, or at most forty parishes are enough for one Diocese ; 
unless their location is very compact. And though the number in 
this Diocese, excepting some very small, does not much exceed 
forty, it is desirable that as soon as it can with propiety be effected, 
this Diocese should be divided. Vermont, especially, however 
reluctantly I might relinquish the happiness of my present very 
interesting connexion with its Churches, ought, as soon as cii'cum- 
stances will admit, to have a Bishop wholly its OAvn." 



JO UBJ{AL-1 822. 201 

" On my return from Maine, I passed Sunday, the 22d, in Ports- 
mouth, whore I preached three times, and confirmed thirty persons. 
What the state of this Church is and what the politeness and hos- 
pitality of its members, we all have the pleasure, of seeing." 

" The 24th, I preached and confirmed in Newburyport. In the 
evening we had a second service, when the Rev. Dr. Jarvis preached 
to a large, and very attentive congregation. The solemnity of the 
services, and, in all human appearance, their good effect, evinced 
more forcibly than many arguments, the expedience and utility of 
occasionally opening our Churches in the evening and, when prac- 
ticable, of doing it at regular and stated seasons. In towns, and 
large villages especially, where the people may easily assemble, the 
salutary effect of such extra services is very manifest. Many will 
attend these meetings, who cannot, with convenience, and some 
who cannot consistently with what they suppose their duty, 
attend our religious worship at other times. A third service is pe- 
culiarly beneficial on Sunday evenings, when the minds of people 
are less engaged with temporal cares, and more disposed to spirit- 
ual things. Very many, of young people, especially, who would 
otherwise spend the evening of the Lord's Day in idle parties and 
vain conversation, are drawn to the house of God, and their atten- 
tion called to things which concern their immortal welfare. " 

" My last information from those parts " — the northwestern part 
of Vermont — "which is quite recent, states, that the prospects are 
still brightening. Since my visit there, a parish has been formed 
in Enosburgh. Mr. Gray, the Minister now officiating in those new 
parishes, has preached in several other towns in the vicinity. Large 
congregations assemble to hear the Word ; many are desirous to 
obtain Prayer Books ; and, in all human probability, several other 
societies might be easily formed. There are already between sixty 
aad seventy Communicants, where, a short time since, we bad 
none. The call there for missionary labours is still increasing." 

" The General Convention in October last, as is well known, was 
specially called on the business of the Theological Seminary. The 
result was happier than perhaps any of the members, under exis- 
ting circumstances, had dared to hope. To avoid the dreadful 
evils of strife and litigation, it was judged expedient to yield, 
almost wholly, to the high claims of the Diocese of New-York. 



202 JO JJBKAL-l 822. 

The Constitution adopted, gives tLe Gener^^l Convention some 
control in the concerns of the Seminary : but in its operation, it 
will no doubt be managed chiefly by that Diocese. It is not my 
intention, however, to insinuate that the management is placed in 
improper hands. Its location in the most populous, commercial 
and frequented city of our country, will necessarily exclude a large 
part of our theological students from the school ; and is, in my 
judgment, on other accounts, injudicious." 

During the last two years, every parish in this Diocese, except 
some very recently organized, has been visited. In almost all of 
them Confirmation has been once administered, and in many of 
them twice. The whole number confirmed is six hundred and fifty • 
two : a number certainly not large for so many Churches. But it 
should be considered, that the greater part of our parishes are yet 
very small; and also that I have not thought it my duty to encour- 
age any to make that solemn profession of their belief and devo- 
tion to God, except they are sufficiently instructed in Christianity, 
and receive the ordinance from pious, conscientious motives. The 
practice, which we may well fear has not been uncommon, of ad- 
mitting to confirmation, and even urging to be confirmed, those 
who have no serious sense of religion, nor real intention to devote 
themselves to God, through Christ, is injurious to Christianity, and 
to our Church in particular : it has caused confirmation to be light- 
ly esteemed, and much neglected. And we may add, as a further 
reason, why there are in this Diocese so few confirmations, that a 
great proportion of our largest parishes are on the sea-board; in 
which, it is painful to state, there are fewer males who receive the 
Christian ordinances. In a visitation to one of our principal 
Churches, there were fifty females confirmed, and not one male. 
In our country Churches the men are little enough attentive to 
spiritual things; but they are still less so in commercial towns. 
If ' one goes his way to his farm,'' rather than his Saviour; still 
more frequently does "another to his merchandize. " 

" To the list of candidates have been added, Seneca White, 
Wm. T. Potter, Benjamin C. Cutler, Lot Jones, Charles H. Alden, 
George Griswold, and George Richardson. The number is small, 
as is also that of the ordinations. Alfred L. Baury, John J. Robin- 
son, Samuel B. Shaw, Silas Blaisdale, Stephen H. Tyng, Jordan 



J0UBJfAL-lS22. 203 

Gray, Charles H. Alden, Alexander Jones, Junior, and Benjamin 
C. Cutler, have been received to the Order of Deacons ; and the 
Rev. Isaac Boyle only has been ordainad a Presbyter. " 

" Mr. Shaw and Mr. Tyng have had Letters Dimissory to the 
Southern States. " 

"There is one subject, which, in every Address, and on every 
occasion ; in season and out of season ; I think it my duty to keep 
constantly in view, and which I scarcely need add, is that of assist- 
ing our small poor parishes. In addition to what ; at sundry 
times and in diverse manners ; I have said upon this point, permit 
me to call your attention to the hard case of those who, from a 
conscientious preference for the doctrines, worship, and discipline 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, have withdrawn from other 
denomintions, and from whom, they have been accustomed to re- 
ceive much attention, and enjoy great privileges, and have formed 
themselves into societies, according to our order and discipline ; 
and now find themselves, in a great degree, or altogether, neg- 
lected. They have none to encourage, none to instruct them : 
they rarely, if ever, hear the words of life from the lips of our 
Ministers; they become at length disheartened, and discontinue 
their efforts. Were they suitably and in season cherished, others 
would be encouraged to follow their example. But as the case is, 
the contrary is the effect. Many whose faith and hearts are with 
• us, are deterred from making an effort so hopeless." 

"In no one thing as I conceive, can we better promote the 
interests of religion, than in selecting, encouraging, and aiding 
pious young men, of suitable qualifications, to labour as Mission- 
aries in the remote parts of this Diocese. Or, if there be any one 
duty of still greater importance, it is, that all the members of our 
Churches should be more frequent, and more earnest in our 
prayers to Almighty God, and the adorable Head of the Church, 
that He will send Labourers into His Harvest — Pastors after His 
own mind; and that he will direct and prosper those who are now 
engaged in the sacred ministry. It is much to be feared that 
there is among us a very great deficiency in this duty, without 
which, you well know, all we do else is to little purpose. Our 
blessed Lord has particularly commanded us, as the most effectual 
means of obtaining labourers for His work, to apply directly, by 



204 JO URKAL-1 823. 

prayer, to Him, '■the Lord of the Harvest.'' That he may inspire, 

direct, and hear our prayers, God mercifully grant through Jesus 

Christ." 

The whole Address from which the foregoing paragraphs are 

copied may be found in the Gospel Advocate, vol. ii. pp. 330-340. 

Boston Nov. 1822. 

The alterations in the Constitution of the Eastern Diocese 
proposed at the last Meeting of the Convention — in 1820 — were 
unanimously adopted. By these alterations, Maine became a 
member of the Diocese, the Meetings of the Convention Annual, 
and all the Clergy and a Delegate from each Church, members of 
the Convention. 

The following alterations in the Constitution were proposed in 
the Convention of 1822, and ordered to lie over for consideration 
at the next meeting of the same, viz. in the second Article, that 
the words, "each of the States by rotation," be erased, and the 
words, " such place as shall be agreed upon at the preceding Con- 
vention," be inserted ; also, that after the words, "lay delegate," 
the words, " or delegates, not exceeding three," be inserted. In 
the tenth Article, that the word annual be substituted for the 
word lieunial. Gospel Advocate, vol. ii, p. 357. 



1823. 

MiDDLEBURT, June 24th, 1823. 

This being the day appointed by the Constitution for the 
Annual Meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in Vermont, several Clergymen and Lay Del- 
egates, assembled in the Church at Middlebury, at half 
past nine o'clock, a. m. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was elected President and 
the Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

The following Clergymen were present : 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, The Rev. Carlton Chase, 
The Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, The Rev. Samuel B. Shaw, 
The Rev. Joel Clap, The Rev. Elijah Brainard. 



JO TJEMAL-1 823. 205 

The following Delegates presented Certificates of their 
appointment and took their seats : 

BETHEL AND BETIIESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON: 

Noble Hard. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 

Jesse Hard, Truman Purdt. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE : 

Joshua Isham, Nehemiah Saxton. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 

Abu AH Hawlet. 

UNION CHURCH. ST. ALBANS: ' 

John Richardson, Samuel A. Wilkins. 

grace church, SHELDON: 

John S. G-allup. 

calvary church, BERKSHIRE: 

Amherst Willoughbt. 

ENOSBURGH: 

William Barber. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY: 

John L. Clap, 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

B. Cotton. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD : 

Cyprian Stevens. 

On motion resolved, That the Rev. Moses Burt, from the 
Diocese of New- York, be invited to an honorary seat in this 
Convention. 

■ On motion, adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine 
Service. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. Samuel B. Shaw 
and a Sermon preached by the Rev. Carlton Chase. The 
Holy Communion was administered by the Reverend the 



206 JOUR^AL-1823. 

President, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Shaw. After which, 
the Convention met according to adjournment. 

The Hon. Daniel Cliipman, Middlebury, exhibited his 
Credentials and took his seat. 

Cotesworth P. Bronson, having satisfied the Convention 
of his appointment, as a Lay Delegate from St. Matthew's 
Church, Sandgate, was admitted to his seat. 

On motion, the Convention adjourned until 3 o'clock, . 

p. M. 

Three o'clock, p. m. The Convention met according to 
adjournment. Samuel B, Booth, Lay Delegate -from Ver- 
gennes, presented his Credentials and took his seat. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a 
Committee of three be appointed to revise the Canons of 
the Church in this State. 

The following gentlemen were appointed the Committee ; 
The Rev. Carlton Chase, the Rev. Benjamin B. Smith and 
the Hon. Daniel Chipman. 

The following Parochial Reports were presented and read : 

BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

Marriage, 1 ; Funerals, 11 ; Communicants, 80. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, MINISTEE. 

Baptisms, 5; Marriage, 1; Funerals, 5; Communicants, 57. 
These Churhes, for the last year, have suffered much from deaths 
and removals, and but one Communicant has been added to each. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS, 

CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR, 

Continues in a flourishing condition. Nothing worthy of particu- 
lar notice has taken place during the past year. Marriage, 1 ; 
Deaths, 8 ; Communicants, 26. It is expected, that a considerable 
number of children will soon be baptized. 



JOURNAL— 1823. 207 

The parish in Middlebury has been called to contend with 
numerous difficulties and discouragements. It is long since they 
have enjoyed the ministrations of a stated Pastor. And the faith 
and hope of its friends have been tried to the utmost. They have 
been discouraged by the removal and death of some of their 
warmest supporters ; and they have, in some instances, been for- 
saken by their firm friends, who were finally discouraged by the 
low prospects of the Church. But a new impulse appears now to 
be felt. Very active exertions are making to render the small 
house where they worship more commodious, and to provide a 
fixed maintenance for a permanent Minister. Encouraging hopes 
are now entertained that they will see days of prosperity accord- 
ing to the days wherein they have seen adversity. And it is 
hoped that fervent prayers are ascending, and will continue to 
ascend, for God's special blessing upon those exertions which are 
making for the advancement of His kingdom in the midst of us. 
The number of Communicants has been greatly diminished by 
death and removal. It is now only twenty-seven. The number 
of Baptisms the last year has been only three— one by the Rev, 
Mr, Bronson, and two, by the present Pastor. 

Benjamin B. Smith. 



TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD, 

E. BRAINARD, MISSIONARY. 

Communicants, 60 ; Deaths, 2. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

E. BRAINARD, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms, 3 ; Communicants, 42. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

E. BRAINARD, MISSIONARY. 

Births, 3 ; Baptisms, 2 ; Communicants, 11 ; Removals, 7. 



208 JO URJfAL-1 823. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 7, children 10) — 17 ; Marriages, 3; Funer- 
als, 6 ; Communicants, 62. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

Communicants, 24. 

ENOSBURGH. 
Communicants, 12. 

BERKSHIRE. 

Baptism, 1 ; Communicants, 27. 

These Parishes have sustained a very great loss, in the sudden 
death of their worthy and much beloved Minister, the Reverend 
Jordan Gray, whose clerical labours were peculiarly acceptable to 
the people of his charge, and the unblemished holiness and piety 
of his life had endeared him to a numerous circle of friends 
among whom, the prospect of his future usefulness was continually 
brightening, until the Great Head of the Church, in His holy 
providence, removed him from his labours, on the 7th of April 
last, while attempting to cross a small stream swollen by the rains. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms (adult 1, children 12) — 13 ; Communicants, 56. 
CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

SAMUEL BRENTON SHAW, MINISTER. 

Baptism, 1 ; Marriages, 2 ; Deaths, 5 ; Communicants, 45. 
As many as seventy-five, according to the last year's report, have 
communed in this Church, but not more than the above number 
consider themselves Episcopalians. Families, 65 ; Sunday Schol- 
ars, 50. This Parish was destitute of clerical services during a 
great part of the past year. 



JO URJfAL-1 823. 209 

ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH, SANDGATE. 

C. P, BRONSON, LAY READER. 

Funerals, 2; Communicants, 22; Families, 30. The prospects 
of this Church are somewhat encouraging ; there is a Sunday 
School established here which is quite promising, in which are 
taught every Sabbath from thirty to forty scholars. 

The whole number of Baptisms, 45; Burials, 34; Communi- 
cants, 551. 

The following gentlemen were elected the Standing Com- 
mittee, for the ensuing year : The Eev. Abraham Bronson 
the Eev. Carlton Chase, the Kev. George Leonard, the Rev' 
Benj. B. Smith and the Rev. Joel Clap. 

The following gentlemen were appointed the Prudential 
Committee : Hon. Daniel Chipman, Hon. Jonathan H 
Hubbard, Dorastus Wooster, Joshua Isham, and George 
Cleveland, Esqrs. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved. That in case 
there should be a Special Meeting of the General Convention 
withm the ensuing year, the Delegates appointed by this 
Convention, at their last annual meeting, be authorized to 
represent this Convention in that body. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the 
Agents and Attorneys of the "Incorporated Society estab- 
lished in London for the Propagation of the Gospel in For- 
eign Parts,'' be requested to lay before this Convention 
such information as they possess in relation to Lands which 
they have in charge for said Society, and what the Church 
m this State may reasonably expect from the avails of said 
Lands. 

The following extract from the Journal of the General 
Convention, received from the Secretary of the House of 
Clerical and Lay Deputies, was laid before the Convention • 
"Resolved, That in order that the contingent expenses of 
the General Convention may be defrayed, that it be rec- 



210 JOVRMAL-1823. 

ommended to the several Diocesan and State Conventions 
to forward to the Secretary of the House of Clerical and 
Lay Deputies at each meeting of said Convention, the sura 
of seventy-five cents for each Clergyman within said Dio- 
cese and State." 

Whereupon, on motion of the Rev. Mr. Smith, Eesolved, 
That this Convention highly approve of the method pro- 
posed by the Secretary of the General Convention with 
regard to the mode of defraying the incidental expenses of 
that body ; and that it holds itself in readiness to comply 
with said resolution. 

On motion of the Hon. Mr. Chipman, Eesolved, That 
the Secretary be directed to deliver over to the Clerk of the 
Agents of " The Incorporated Society established at Lon- 
don for the Propagation of the Grospel in Foreign Parts," 
all the papers and documents in his possession relating to 
the Lands in this State belonging to said Society. 

The Rev. Mr. Chase proposed the following amendments 
to the Constitution : after the word "Convention," in the 
second line of the 4th Article in the printed copy, to strike 
out the words, " and when there is to be a session of the 
General Convention within the ensuing year," and insert 
the word "also :" After the words "delegation shall," in 
the 4th line, to insert the word "' annually." Also, in the 
5th line, after the words " this State in" to strike out the 
words " that body; also as long as this State shall belong 
to the Eastern Diocese, a delegation shall be appointed to 
attend each Diocesan Convention, or at some meeting 
specially warned for that purpose," and insert the words 
"the General Convention." Also, in the 11th line of said 
Article, to strike out the words " or Diocesan." 

Adjourned, until 8 o'clock, to-morrow morning, 

Thursday, June 25th, 8 o'clock, a. m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

Hannibal Hodges, Lay Delegate from Trinity Church, 
Rutland, presented his Credentials and took his seat. 



JOVRKAL-18^3. 211 

The Hon. Daniel Chipman, in behalf of the Agents and 
Attorneys of " The Incorporated Society established at 
London for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," 
made a verbal report, in answer to the request contained in 
a resolution adopted by this Convention yesterday. Where- 
upon, Resolved, That the said Agents be requested to reduce 
said Report to writing, aud the Secretary is directed to 
publish the same with the Journal, together with such 
remarks on the same, as may be useful to the members of 
the Church in this State ; and that the Rev. Benj. B. Smith, 
George Cleveland and Dorastus Wooster, Esqs. be, and are 
hereby appointed a Committee to carry the object of this 
resolution into effect. 

On motion, adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine 
Service. 

Morning Prayer was read by the Rev. Joel Clap, and a 
Sermon preached by the Rev. Benj. B. Smith : After which 
the Convention met according to adjournment. 

On motion, by the Rev, Mr. Smith, Resolved, That the 
next Annual Meeting of this Convention be held in Christ 
Church, Bethel. 

The Rev. Benjamin B. Smith was appointed to preach 
at the opening of the next Convention, and the Rev. Sam- 
uel B. Shaw, his Substitute. 

The Rev. Mr. Chase, in behalf of the Committee appoint- 
ed to revise the Canons, presented a report which was 
accepted ; and after the adoption of sundry amendments 
to the second Canon as reported, the following Canons were 
adopted by the Convention : 

CANON I. 

OF THE MODE OF TRYING CLERGYMEN ACCUSED OF MISDE- 
MEANOR. 

Whenever the Standing Committee shall have reason to 
suspect any Clergyman ot this Church to be guilty of in- 
fidelity, heresy, vice, or irregularity of any kind', it shall be 



212 JOTJRKAL-1823. 

their duty to inquire into the circumstances of the case ; 
and if, upon such inquiry, they are convinced, that there 
exists sufficient cause of complaint, they shall represent the 
same to the Bishop, at the same time stating specifically 
whereof the party is accused ; whereupon, by order of the 
Bishop, a council of Presbyters, consisting of not less than 
three, shall be convened, who under the direction of the 
Bishop, shall proceed in due time to try the party accused ; 
a copy of the accusation or accusations, and twenty days 
notice of the time and place of trial being communicated 
to such party. And furthermore, it shall be the duty of 
the Standing Committee at such trial, to lay before the 
Bishop and his Presbyters, such evidence as they may be 
able to obtain relative to the case under investigation. 

CANON II. 

OF THE FORMING AND ORGANIZING OF CHURCHES. 

Whenever any number of persons in this State shall form 
themselves into a regular Society, of the Protestant Episco- 
pal faith, in such manner, as that they will become a body 
corporate according to law, and their proceedings shall be 
sanctioned by the Bishop of the Diocese and the Standing 
Committee of this State, or in case of a vacancy in the 
Episcopal Office, by the state Convention or its Standing 
Committee, they shall be admitted to all the rights and 
privileges of a regular Church, subject at all times to the 
authority and discipline of said Bishop, or in case of a 
vacancy in the Episcopal Office, of said Convention or its 
Standing Committee. 

Voted, That the money in the hands of the Secretary be 
appropriated towards defraying the expense of printing the 
Journal of the Convention. 

The Rev. Benj. B. Smith and the Hon. Daniel Chipman 
were appointed a Committee to report to the next annual 
meeting of this Convention, a uniform mode of election of 



J0URJ{J.L-1823. 213 

Lay Delegates from the several parishes in this State, and a 
form of certificate of said election. 
Adjourned, without day. 

Attest, JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

REPORT OF THE AGENTS. 

To the Convention of the Episcopal Church of the State of 
Vermont, now convened at Middlebury, the undersigned, Agents 
and Attorneys of the Incorporated Society established at London 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for recovering 
the possession of their Lands in the State of Vermont, and appro- 
priating the avails thereof for the support of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in said State, in compliance with the request con- 
tained in your resolution of the 24th inst., cheerfully give to the 
Convention the following information relating to said lands : 

By the Charters of most of the Townships in this State issued by 
the Governor of Nfew-Harapshire, one Right in each Township was 
granted to the Incorporated Society established at London for the 
Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. Soon after the issuing 
of the Charters, and before the Towns were generally settled, the 
Revolution intervened, by which the Territory became indepen- 
dent of Great Britain. Soon after the Treaty of Peace, to wit, 
on the 20th of May, 1785, the Society, knowing they were vested 
with property in the late American Colonies, and that their title 
thereto was secured to them by the Treaty of 1783, passed the 
following resolution : " Resolved, That the Secretary do write to 
some one or more members of the Church of England in each of 
the States of America, in which the Society has any property, to 
take proper care in securing said property, and further inform such 
persons, that it is the intention of the Society to make over all 
such property to the use of the Episcopal Church in that Country, 
in whatever manner or form, after communication with the several 
Governments, shall appear most effectual for that purpose." A 
copy of the foregoing resolution having been transmitted to the 
principal Episcopalians, in the United States, measures were im- 
mediately taken by the Church in New-Hampshire, to procure the 



214 JOURKAL-1823. 

lands belonging to the Society in that State, consisting of a Right 
in most of the towns, granted in the same form as were the Town- 
ships in this State. And they soon after procured from the Soci- 
ety, a conveyance to Messrs. Adams and Sheaf, or rather procured a 
Power of Attorney to thera, authorizing them to recover possession 
of the Lands in the name of the Society, and to appropriate the 
Reati and Profits to the support of the Church in that State. Suits 
were afterwards commenced by said Agents, to recover possession 
of the Lands in the State Courts, and in the Court of the United 
States, and recoveries had in both. It does not appear by the 
Journals of the Convention in this State, that any thing was done 
by the Church, towards procuring the Lands from the Society un- 
til the Month of September, 1794, when the Convention appoint- 
ed a Committee to make application to the Society for the Lands, 
consisting of the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. Daniel Bar- 
ber, the Rev. J. C. Ogden, Messrs. Eleazer Baldwin, Truman 
Squier, Matthew Lyon and Ebenezer Marvin. It appears that 
this Committee made application for the Lands to the Society 
throuo-h their Agent, Col. John A. Graham, but were unsuccessful. 
It does not appear that any further step was taken by the 
Church, to obtain said Lands, until the meeting of the Convention 
at Arlington, in the year 1805, when the Convention directed 
their Standing Committee to take further steps to obtain the 
Society Lands in Vermont ; and appointed on said Committee 
the Rev. Bethuel Chittenden, the Rev. Abraham Bronson, Daniel 
Chipman, Truman Squier, Martin Roberts and Anson J. Sperry, 
Esqrs. This Committee also made application to the Society for 
their Lands in this State, but failed in their application as appears 
by a letter from the Secretary of the Society to Bishop Moore, 
throuo-h whom the application was made, bearing date Nov. 30, 
1808. The reason why this application was unsuccessful, is 
perfectly obvious from the following extract from said letter : 
"There have been indeed a variety of applications from the 
State of Vermont, so different in their object and design, that 
the Society could not comply with any of them, desirous 
as they are to extend the cause of religion to the utmost of 
their power." No further steps were taken to obtain the Lands, 
until the year 1811, when the Rev. Abraham Bronson and Anson 



JOTJBKAL-1823. 215 

J. Sperry, Esq. delegates from this State, to the General Conven- 
tion of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States, 
holden at New-Haven, in Connecticut, in the month of May, ob- 
tained a resolution of the Convention, directing Bishop White, 
the Presiding Bishop of the House of Bishops, to write to the 
Society in London, in behalf of the Convention, and inform them, 
that the Church in Vermont was regularly organized and under 
the care of the Bishop of the Eastern Diocese, and that a Board of 
Trustees of Donations to the Church had been incorporated iu 
Massachusetts, and that it vvas the opinion of the Convention that 
their Lands in Vermont might be safely conveyed to such Agents 
and Attorneys as might be recommended by said Board of 
Trustees, and approved by the Convention of Vermont. In pursu- 
ance of the above resolution, such a letter was written by Bishop 
White, and on the recommendation of the leading Church people 
in Vermont, the said Trustees in Boston on the 5th day of June 
1815, recommended the present Agents, and this recommend- 
ation was approved of by the Convention of this State holden at 
Arlington on the 28th of the same June. The Agents thus appoint- 
ed, by order of the Convention, immediately transmitted all the 
papers and documents relating to the application to the Society 
for the Lands, to the Hon. and Rev. Charles Stewart, who then 
resided in the Province of Canada, and was about to visit London. 
This extraordinary man was one of the Scottish Nobility, who had 
taken orders in the Church, and whose piety and zeal in promoting 
her interests, had prompted him to cross the ocean, and to place 
himself in that part of the Province of Lower Canada which bor- 
ders on this State, and there spend his time and his income in 
forming Churches, and in visiting families in that new settled 
country and giving them moral and religious instruction. The 
influence of such a man, the Agents were sure, would remove that 
jealousy and suspicion, which the Society had imbibed, in relation 
to the Church in Vermont. In this they were not disappointed. 
A power of Attorney was executed by the Society bearing date 
the 5th day of December, 1816, authorizing the Agents and At- 
torneys, "to sue for and recover possession of said Lands, and for 
and in the name of said Society to lease them or any part of them 
to such person or persons, and for such term or number of years 



216 JOURJ^AL-1823. 

and at and under such yearly and other rent, as they, or a majority 
of them should think fit and proper, and also to sue for, recover 
and receive all rents, incomes and profits which then were or 
should hecome due and owing to said Society." 

The power given to the Agents to appropriate the rents and 
profits is as follows, to wit : There shall be appropriated such 
parts and shares of such incomes and profits as the Agents and 
Attorneys shall judge just and proper to the use and benefit of 
such person as may be elected and canonically consecrated to the 
office of Bishop over the State of Vermont, and to the use and 
benefit of his successor in the office of Bishop in said State, and 
the remaining incomes and profits of said Lauds to be appropriated 
to the use and support of a Clergyman and his successors of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in each of said Townships, when a 
Church shall be formed therein, and the worship of God performed 
according to the Liturgy of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the United States of America. And in such towns where no 
Church shall be established as aforesaid, the remaining income, 
rents and profits to the support of Clergymen, building of Churches, 
defraying the expense of suits for the recovery of said Lands, and 
the incomes and profits thereof, and for such other uses and pur- 
poses as the said Agents and Attorneys shall judge will best con- 
duce to the welfare of the Church in said State of Vermont, and 
to do all other acts and things concerning the premises, as fully, in 
every respect, as the said Society can or could do. And one or 
more Attorneys under them for the purposes aforesaid, to make, 
and again at their pleasure revoke." 

After the receipt of the foregoing power of Attorney, the Agents 
waited until well advised respecting the title of the Society, be- 
fore they commenced any suit for the recovery of the Lands. 
When satisfied that the fee of the Land was in the Society, and 
that they must recover possession of them in a Court of Law, the 
Agents caused an Action of Ejectment to be commenced before 
the Circuit Court of the United States, against the town of New- 
Haven, and William Wheeler, their tenant, on a lot laid to the 
Society Right in that Town. The object of the Agents in com- 
mencing the suit against the Town of New-Haven, in preference 
to any other Town, was, that they were sure the suit would be 



JO VRKAL-1 823. 217 

defended to the utmost, and carried to the Supreme Court of the 
United States for a final decision, that all further litigation might 
be prevented. In this they were not disappointed. The Town 
of New-Haven employed counsel to defend the suit, and while 
pending in the Circuit Court, made application to the Legislature, 
who appointed an Agent to defend the suit and made a liberal 
appropriation of money to defray the expense. The counsel for tho 
Society and the counsel employed by the State on the part of the 
defendants, united in taking such a course with the suit, that a 
final decision might be had therein by the Supreme Court of the 
United States, which should satisfy all parties in relation to the ti- 
tle of the Society to these Lands, and thus prevent further litigation. 
With this view it was agreed that a special verdict should be drawn 
up embracing all the material facts ; and it was further agreed, 
that, if, on the argument of the case, before the Supreme Court, it 
should appear that any material facts on either side<»liad been 
omitted, they should be added to the special verdict. Mr. Hop- 
kinson of Philadelphia, argued the cause for the Society, and Mr. 
Webster of Boston, for the defendants, and both were satisfied that 
the special verdict embraced all the material facts in the case. 
The cause was argued in the winter of 1822, and taken under con- 
sideration by the Court until the last term of the Supreme Court, 
when judgment was rendered for the plaintiffs by six Judges, one 
Judge dissentinaf. 

The Agents are therefore confident that all further litigation 
would be useless, and that it will not be necessary to resort to any 
further actions of Ejectment. 

On the 30th of April last, the Agents met at Middlebury, to 
take measures for leasing the lands, and althoiigh satisfied that they 
could recover all the prior rents which had been paid to the towns, 
yet under all the circumstances it was unanimously agreed to lease 
them to the present tenants, without requiring the payment of the 
rents which had become payable before the decision of the Supreme 
Court was made known. That the buildings and betterments made 
on the lands by the tenant, should be considered as his, and the 
land leased to him at a rent proportioned to the value of the land, 
without reference to the buildings aud betterments made by him; 
but this on condition that the tenant surrender his lease from the 
Town, so as to cut off all claim of his ao-ainst the town. 



218 JOUBJfAL-1823. 

Ao-ents were also appointed in the different counties authorized 
to execute leases in the name of the Society, and it is confidently 
believed that leases will be taken of the lands, and no further sum 
expended in hopeless litigation. 

In relation to the probable income of the lands, the Agents can 
not at present give any satisfactory information. We believe that 
the annual income will amount to Four Thousand, and that it will 
not exceed Five Thousand, Dollars. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, 
DANIEL CHIPMAN, 
ANSON J. SPERRY. 
Middlebury, June 26, 1823. 

Note. It is necessary to remark that the only remaining Agent, 
the Rt. Rev. Alexander V. Griswold, was unable to attend the State 
Convention, and that his signature is therefore necessarily wanting. 

REMARKS OF THE COMMITTEE. 

The resolution of the Convention, in which the Agents of the 
Society's Lands were called upon to furnish such statements, with 
regard to their proceedings, and the history and present state of 
those Lands, as they should deem proper to appear upon the 
Journals, of the Convention, did also constitute a Committee " to 
make such remarks on the same as may be useful to the members 
of the Church in this State." In conformity with that resolution, 
your Committee respectfully submit the following remarks : 

In addition to the facts contained in the body of this report in 
relation to the first grant, and succeeding history of these lands as 
drawn from papers in possession of the Agents, there exists a variety 
of others, which will sufficiently explain why such grants, and to 
so large an extent were made. Gov. Wentworth, under whose 
administration they took place, was himself an Episcopalian. But 
at that period the number who thought like him was very small. 
They were emphatically a minor sect. Congrcgationalists made 
up a vast majority of the Colonists. Indeed that denomination 
was by the Colonial Government considered and treated as the 
established religion. In pursuing the reigning policy of the age 
to promote the settlement of the new plantations, the government 
foresaw that they would be chiefly settled by the prevailing de- 



JOURJfAL-1823. 219 

nomination. Whatever encouragement, therefore, was necessary 
in those periods for the introduction and support of religion, was 
less necessary for the reigning sect, than for minor ones. Their 
numbers constituted an obvious and sufficient resource. But it 
was presumed that Episcopalians would not be easily induced to 
remove far back into the remote settlements, without some reason- 
able hope and strong encouragement that they would be able to 
maintain the ministry and services to which they were so strongly 
attached. What expectations were wanting from their numbers, 
needed to be supplied in some other way. Accordingly, whilst 
only one right of land was given to the first settled minister, who, 
it was foreseen, would commonly be a Congregationlist, two rights 
were granted to Episcopalians, one, for a Glebe, and the other for 
the benefit of the Society for propagating the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts. 

The first right, in most cases, fell into the possession of the 
ruling denomination ; and as it became, in fee, the property of the 
first settled minister, appears to have answered the very purpose 
which the grantors expected and designed. 

And under the expectation that the other rights would finally 
enable them to support thier own ministers and services, several 
Episcopalians were induced to remove into the new Townships. But 
owing to a variety of causes, their hopes have been deferred, baf- 
fled and nearly destroyed. And the posterity of those persons 
who were induced to move into a region so remote from the field 
of Episcopal Ministrations are reduced to depend for the supply of 
them, upon their own exertions, and the small remnant of proper- 
ty which had at length been recovered. And it is presumed that 
no objections will be urged against their receiving possession of 
this property, since every other public right has been secured to its 
designated use and employment. 

But if any such objections should be raised, it is difficult to see 
what they can eftect. From the Report of the Agents it will be 
seen, that every arrangement was made to have the decision 
which has been given, a final one. The cause was carried to the 
highest tribunal, was advocated by the most able counsel, and 
decided, after a full investigation, by a court, the very constitution 
of which, places its Judges far above all personal or State infln- 



220 JOURMAL-1823. 

ence. And in tliis case it is in vain to look for any sectarian 
prejudices, for not only the same Court, but the same Judges 
decided the Glebe case against the Church, by which she is for- 
ever deprived of the use of those lands, which have now given 
judgment in favour of the Society for propagating the Gospel. 

It is presumed that no persons would be disposed to urge objec- 
tions against the recovery of the Propagation Lots, if they could 
be made to believe that the benefits which will be derived from 
them in future, will be far greater than any which have been 
hitherto realized. 

It is confidently expected that this position will appear clearly 
and abundantly supported by a comparison of the nature and 
extent of the former and future good effects resulting from the 
application of the avails of these lands. 

No attempt will be made to undervalue or depreciate the bene- 
fits of education. Here the language of the most extravagant 
eulogy is scarcely the language of truth. The invaluable effects 
of a good education, and of the widest possible diffusion of it, are 
far beyond all human calculation. They are not to be made mat- 
ter of cool mathematical calculation. They cannot be taken hold 
of, and counted and weighed. At the same time they are known 
by effects too mighty to be overlooked, and are felt with an 
energy and a blessedness which cannot be mistaken. Parents 
cannot see how education blesses their offspring, but they can feel, 
that under its influence, they are growing up to make glad their 
hearts. Children cannot feel the hand which is moulding their 
characters and their hearts, but they find themselves growing up 
bold in thought, proud in feeling, aspiring in hope, and vigorous 
in enterprise. The secret influence of general and good education 
is noiseless and unnoticed in its progress, but its results are too 
mighty and too glorious to pass unregarded. The community is 
blessed by it, through all its limits. And our homes are made 
the pure, contented and happy abodes which we find them, in a 
great measure, by means of the education which has exalted their 
inmates. 

But are these blessings to be compared with those which flow 
from the diffusion of Christian knowledge and piety ? Separate 
the ingredients of a nation's knowledge, from the ingredients of 



JOURJfAL-1823. 221 

a nation's morality, and what is their real estimation ? They will 
prove the materials of rnin and desolation. Clear heads are 
dangerous pioneers to bad hearts. Religion alone can sanctify 
knowledge, and make her the handmaid of happiness. Politicians 
are mistaken when they refer our civil and social advantages 
chiefly to the diffusion of knowledge. It is much more fairly 
ascribed to the influence of religion. It is this which has pre- 
vented the curses which are inseparable from a state of intellect- 
ual culture, if moral culture does not keep pace with it. Intelli- 
gence elevates the character, but religion preserves it when thus 
elevated, pure and refined, and pre-eminently happy. 

Other securities were provided for the diffusion of the less val- 
uable of these blessings. The lands in question were consecrated 
to the higher and better purpose. For many years they have 
been diverted from their designated and proper channel, and it is 
highly satisfactory to the friends of the Church, that although 
they have not been suffered " to make glad the city of our God," 
they have been watering a fair garden, and maturing valuable 
fruits. And on the other hand they cannot be brought to believe 
that good men will resist, the application of these lands to the 
high uses of Christianity upon the pretence that it will be rob- 
bing the State of a great benefit. Surely the good sense and the 
happy experience of the people of Vermont will not suffer their 
schools to languish because lands to which they had no legal right 
are withdrawn from them. They cannot be so ungrateful and 
unreasonable as to charge upon Episcopalians the fault of any 
injury which Schools may suffer from giving up an income to 
which their claim was unrighteous and illegal ? 

We are bound, therefore, to believe that new efforts will be 
made in behalf of Schools, and in addition to the blessings which 
the State will derive from their increased prosperity, it will find 
its moral and religious character very much elevated and improved 
by the labours of those Clergymen, whom these funds will sup- 
port. The sum of good will thus be greatly increased ; and the 
community will receive unexpected benefits from a decision which 
some affect to believe will be a great disadvantage to it. 

The grantors of the public rights appear to have been impressed 
with a very correct sense of the general advantages of both these 



222 JOURJfAL-1823. 

methods of diffusing knowledge, and to have given no very equiv- 
ocal expression of their estimate of the value of the one method 
above the other, when they assigned one right to schools, and 
three to the support of religion. In the course of events, two of 
these have been secured for the benefit of schools, and one for the 
use of a minister. Now if it were a que.stion with the community 
at large how the remaining right should be disposed of, we can- 
not conceive that it would completely reverse the decision of those 
excellent men, by giving three rights to the less valuable object, 
and one only to religion; more especially as the doing of this 
would divest one denomination of Christians of two portions of 
land intended for them. It would surely seem to your Committee 
that all may rest contented in the present equal division of these 
rights, between these invaluable objects. 

These hopes may be rendered less sanguine, by the objection 
that the prejudices and partialities of the people are such that 
they will not attend the ministrations of the Episcopal Clergy. 
Still there are some few individuals scattered in almost every 
town, who decidedly prefer that mode of discipline and worship. 
And in a region which, boasts of perfect toleration, it ought cer- 
tainly to give general satisfaction and pleasure, that any part of 
our population will at length have it in their power to worship 
God, according to the dictates of their own consciences. But 
your Committee are unwilling to believe that the alleged preju- 
dices are so strong. They would deem it highly uncharitable, 
and would be exceedingly sorry to believe, that a Church whose 
doctrines are so Scriptural and pure, whose government is so 
excellent and ancient, whose services are so devotional and sub- 
lime, can be the object of such extreme dislike that people will 
not attend upon its ministry ! They are persuaded, that the more 
the services of the Church are known, the better her doctrines are 
understood, and the oftener her ministry is attended, the less will 
prejudice have to say against it. They cannot help thinking and 
maintaining that the Episcopal Church in this country and in 
England, possesses, on the ground of learning and piety of their 
Clergy, and the abundance of their zeal and good works, in the 
Bible and Missionary cause, a claim upon the good feelings of 
Christian people, which will forbid them to avoid or oppose the 
Clergymen who may minister in Vermont. 



JOVRJ^AL—1823. 223 

But it may still be insisted that such are the existing partialities 
and prejudices in the State, that the Episcopal Clergy will not 
find congregations. If we are conijielled to believe it, who are in 
fault? If the people will not allow themselves to be relieved 
from a part of the expense of supporting Clergymen — if they 
refuse to hear those who are sent among them by means of the 
avails of the Church lands, are Episcopalians to blame ? Is the 
opprobrium to be cast upon them of depriving the State of great 
and extensive benefits ? Most assuredly if the people of the State 
do not derive the greatest benefit from the expected application 
of the property, which has hitherto gone to the support of Schools, 
it will be owing to a cause which Episcopalians, more than any 
other persons will have reason to deplore. 

It is very natural to presume, that amongst the variety of 
remarks which the recovery of the " Propagation Lots" will call 
forth, the motives and designs of Episcopalians will be subjected 
to animadversion and censure. It becomes their duty, therefore 
if they are able, to vindicate their motives and intentions. And 
nothing can be easier than to set them above the reach of reason- 
able suspicion or reproach. 

It surely can scarcely be objected against a man that he has 
been endeavoring to secure what he really believed was his honest 
right! Episcopalians have all along been persuaded that their 
claim to the use of these lands was unquestionable. The most 
eminent jurists advised them to prosecute those claims, confidently 
predicting ultimate success. And the Society in England gladly 
relinquished to them their title, and delegated to them their 
powers. Is it surprising then, or blame-worthy, that they have 
made an attempt at securing such a valuable extent of property ? 
Would they have been doing their duty either to themselves or 
posterity, if they had suffered these rights to have fallen into 
neglect and forgetfulness ? And especially when the condition 
and relative circumstances of Episcopalians are regarded — when 

it is recollected that they are a scattered and opposed people 

that they can seldom collect numbers sufficient to support a min- 
ister — that they are warmly attached to very peculiar rites and 

observances, which none but their own Clergy can administer 

can it excite surprise, or incur blame, that they have exerted 



224 JOURJVAL-1823. 

themselves to secure a provision for their Ministers, which will in 
some degree obviate the difficulties resulting from their small 
numbers, and scattered situation ? In such a case, is there a man 
living, or a society existing, that would not have been as active 
and energetic as the Episcopalians are stated to have been ? 

Again, certain views have been presented of the benefits which 
not only Episcopalians, but the community at large, it is hoped, 
will derive from the recovery of these lands. Now Episcopalians 
are fully persuaded of the correctness of these views. And there 
can be no doubt but their conceptions of the extent of these ben- 
efits are quite as glowing as they should be. It may safely be 
granted that they are highly exaggerated and extravagant — that 
imagination has outstripped the pace of sober calculation — and 
that the good which will actually be secured will not be, by any 
means, commensurate with their sanguine expectations. 

But however false and visionary these views may prove to 
be, they certainly form a perfect exculpation for Episcopalians. 
Benevolence, consistency, and religion alike call upon them to 
exert themselves very actively in securing benefits which they 
believe to be exceedingly great. But their views cannot certainly 
be considered altogether visionary. And far from being blamed 
for labouring to send abi'oad the services and ministrations of a 
Church, which they honour and love, and regard as a peculiar 
safeguard to the most precious doctrines of the Protestant faith, 
they should be highly commended for it. 

But this point is capable of being placed in a light still more 
convincing. From the report of the Agents, it will be particu- 
larly observed, that the first movement towards securing the 
Society Lands in the United States to the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, did not originate with the members or friends of the 
Church, but with the officers of the Society. The Secretary was 
ordered to correspond with Episcopalians in this country, and to 
offer them for the support of their Clergy, the possession and use 
of all the property which was vested in that Society before the 
Revolution. It appears that they were ignorant of the extent of 
property which had been vested in them, but felt confident that 
they should still hold it, whatever might prove its amount, under 
the treaty of 1783. This important fact will serve several valua- 



JO TJRMA L-1 823. 225 

ble purposes. It will shew that the right of the Society to the 
lands which have recently been recovered, appeared very obvious 
to its officers long before it had excited any controversy. And it 
will exculpate the Church from any blame which might be sup- 
posed to attach to her, for prosecuting the claim which was so 
freely and generously resigned to her. What else could her 
friends have done ? If they had refused the generous offer, it 
would most probably have been of no benefit to the State ; for the 
Society would have prosecuted its claims in some other way, and 
the lands lost to the Church would not have been gained by the 
community. But they were not so unwise and ungrateful as to 
disregard the noble propositions of the Society. They thankfully 
received the gift, and set themselves diligently at work to derive 
the utmost benefit from it. And to expect that they would have 
done otherwise, or to impugn their motives for doing so, is very 
unwarrantable, and surprising. 

Your Committee cannot fail to regard the principles adopted 
by the Agents in relation to leasing the lands, and which they 
have announced in their report, as highly accommodating and 
liberal, calculated to leave a very favourable impression upon the 
minds of the people, and to quiet any needless fears by which the 
Tenants or Selectmen may have been excited. And they gladly 
embrace this opportunity of expressing their unanimous and very 
cordial approbation of the zeal and fidelity of the Agents in the 
whole management of this important business. And if their 
motives or proceedings are called in question, or aspersed by 
others, it is hoped that it will perfectly satisfy them to be assured 
that Episcopalians not only confide most perfectly in their integ- 
rity, but feel greatly indebted to their judicious, active, and 
disinterested exertions. 

And your Committee, cannot close their remarks without ad- 
ding a few words of caution. It is very much to be feared that 
the hopes which are raised by the recovery of these lands will be 
far too high ; and that much more will be expected from the Agents 
than they can possibly perform. Their avails will not prove, 
by any means, as great as has been supposed and represented. 
The Parishes must not expect to be relieved altogether from tax- 
ation for the support of the Ministry. And they should be cau- 



226 JO URJfAL-1 823. 

tious not to reduce it too far ; for more injury is done by raising 
taxes ever so little, than good, by sinking them too low, or remit- 
ting them altogether. It will be expected therefore, that the 
Parishes will continue to contribute to support their Ministers 
about in the proportion of their neighbours. And every assistance 
which can hereafter be afforded, the Agents will readily grant. 

It is feared that expectations have been mised that the Agents 
will apply monies to the erection of Churches. But a moment's 
reflection will be sufficient to convince the friends of the Church 
that no appropriations can be more exhausting and ruinous. If 
new Churches are built, parishes who have recently erected them, 
may fairly expect remuneration. If they are built in one town 
where there are lands, the inhabitants of other towns, whether 
Episcopalians or not, will raise a clamour for the same privilege. 
And thus a fund of ten times the extent of that entrusted to these 
Agents, would soon be exhausted. 

Each Town which settles a Minister, will have an unalienable 
right, after deducting expenses, to the rents of the lands in that 
Town for his use. If the inhabitants of such Town will erect 
a building for themselves, and settle a Minister, they will doubt- 
less receive assistance, in proportion with the older parishes, and 
whilst they are building, perhaps in larger proportion. 

Whilst, then, the members of our Communion are admonished 
not to suffer themselves to be deceived by any extravagant and 
unfounded expectations, they are called upon to exert themselves, 
with new and increased ardour in promoting the prosperity of the 
Church of their Fathers. Can we receive into our hands so rich 
a token of the zeal and disinterested piety of the grantors of these 
lands, and not feel excited to imitate them in their work of faith 
and labour of love ? Shall we receive at the hands of a merciful 
God so great and such timely assistance, and not feel constrained 
to show our gratitude, by new and unwonted exertions in the 
cause of His Church? 

Every noble sentiment, every grateful emotion forbids that we 
should do otherwise ! And your Committee, therefore, would 
unite with you in earnest and continual prayers, to Almighty God, 
that He may bless and prosper us, that He may enable us to im- 
prove the means put in our hands for the advancement of His 



JO URMAL-1 823. 227 

Church, and that He may dispose the hearts of all men to assist 
and rejoice in her prosperity, till our Zion shall become the joy 
and the praise of the whole earth. 

B. B. SMITH, 
D. WOOSTER, 
G. CLEVELAND. 

The following passages from the Address of Bishop Griswold 
to the eighth Convention of the Eastern Diocese, at Windsor, in 
Vermont, September 25, 1823, properly form a part of the Journal 
for this year : 

" Once more. Christian Friends, does the Lord's goodness, in 
permitting the Convention of this Diocese to assemble, under 
circumstances of continued prosperity, and increasing hopes, de- 
mand the renewal of our gratitude and praise. The Lord's work 
in our hands, in a general view, is yet advancing ; and the portion 
of His Vineyard, committed to our oversight and care, still enjoys 
the smiles of His kind protecting providence. The general state 
of the Churches, however, differs so little from what it was last 
year, that, in discharging this duty which our Canons assign me, 
it is not necessary to be so particular as on some former occasions. 
The changes, whether calamitous, or favourable, which have occur- 
red, and those of my official transactions more generally interest- 
ing, it will be proper to notice. " 

" During the last year the number confirmed in our Churches 
has been unusually small. We have frequent cause, and never 
more than on the present occasion, to notice and lament the too 
general neglect among our people to avail themselves of those 
comforting testimonials of God's mercy and salvation so graciously 
offered in the ordinances of Christianity. The evil originates, no 
doubt, in a want of regard for its holy doctrines; in too great 
indifferency respecting the one thing needful. At the present 
season, there is, generally speaking, less appearance of pious zeal 
and concern for the spirituality of religion, than at some former 
seasons ; but the Lord, we trust, has yet among us a faithful, 
praying people. " 

"A few only have been ordained to the sacred ministry. 
Messrs. Elijah Brainard, Lot Jones, John West, Theodore Edson, 
and William T. Potter have been admitted to the order of Dea- 



228 JOVRXAL-18^3. 

cons; and the Rev. Alfred L. Baury has been ordained a Presby- 
ter, To the list of Candidates for holy orders have been added 
the names of Daniel L. B. Goodwin, Benjamin C. C. Parker, 
Charles Dresser, Joseph S. Covell, Ethan Allen, and Henry W. 
Ducachet." 

"In November last, Trinity Church, in Claremont, and St. 
Paul's, in which, through the Lord's goodness, we are now con- 
vened were dedicated to the service of Almighty God. The day 
after this Church was consecrated, the Rev. Mr. Leonard was 
instituted into the Parish. The services were well attended ; and 
the kind hospitality of the people of the place added much to the 
satisfaction, which all seemed to enjoy. We have rarely, if ever, 
seen more laudable efforts of pious liberality and united zeal, than 
that which has added to the number of our Churches this beauti- 
ful edifice." 

"The present situation of the Church in Vermont is critical, 
but, we trust, not unhopeful. The much lamented death of our 
Rev. Brother Jordan Gray, was a calamitous event. His talents 
seemed peculiarly fitted for building up the Redeemer's kingdom 
in that part of the Diocese ; and in no part could his labours be 
more needed. Unerring wisdom has seen it most fitting to 
remove him from his labours, and from the world. The Rev. Mr. 
Beach has removed from his parishes in Franklin county, into the 
Diocese of Connecticut. The Rev. Mr. Brainard has officiated 
some time in St. Albans. Three Clergymen are much wanted in 
that county, and parts adjacent." 

" The Parish in Berkshire have finished their Church, and, with 
Divine permission, it will soon be consecrated to the holy purpose 
for which it is erected. The parish in Bethel, also, much to their 
praise, have erected, and almost finished, a house for the same 
sacred use. The Rev. Mr. Shaw has officiated in Guilford, since 
November last. It gives me pleasure to add, that the Rev. Mr. 
Smith has taken the pastoral charge of the Church in Middlebury ; 
and that little flock, we humbly trust, after so long struggling 
with adverse circumstances, will find, from happy experience, it is 
good to wait the Lord's time. The Rev. Alexander Jones has 
left the Diocese." 



JO URJ^J.L-1 823. 229 

" It is of much importance that, where it is practicable, we 
obtain and establish parochial and missionary funds, and provide 
other means of giving a competent maintenance to those who 
labour in the Ministry. And it is equally important, that what- 
ever means or funds of this nature, through the Lord's goodness, 
we already possess, be managed with the utmost prudence and 
good economy, and applied to the best effect. Whatever has 
been o-iven for any religious purpose or charitable use, should be 
most conscientiously applied, according to the will and mtent of 
the pious donors. It is lamentable that even Christians, in a late, 
and often the last solemn act of their lives — the bequeathing of 
their estates to posterity ; declaring to what purpose and to whose 
benefit those good things, which a bountiful God has committed 
to their stewardship, shall be applied, should so generally forget 
to honour their Divine Benefactor; that by so few anything 
should be demised to religious use. Some honourable exceptions 
there are of names which will long shine among the best benefac- 
tors of mankind ; though dead, they yet live to do good on earth, 
and enjoy the fruit of it in heaven. Is it not strange, or rather 
extremely inconsistent, that God's people, who should honour 
Him with their substance, and with the first fruits of all their 
increase, should forget Him in that awful moment — its last distri- 
biition? — that so many Christians had rather that their large 
fortunes should be spent in luxury and dissipation, than in admin- 
istering to famished souls the bread of life ! — that their estates 
should be applied to the ruining, rather than to the saving man- 
kind. Certainly the cases are not few to which these reflections 
may justly be applied ; and are more numerous, we may well fear, 
in our Church, than in any other." 

" Our business is, however, not to judge others, but to take 
heed to ourselves. Let us cherish a grateful remembrance of 
those who have remembered Zion. There are more than one or 
two places in this Diocese in which Churches exist and flourish, 
in consequence of the pious benefactions of individuals. But the 
highest praise we can bestow upon their memories, is a faithful 
discharge of our trust, applying the avails of their liberality to 
the honour of God, and to the promotion of pure and undefiled 
religion." 



230 JOURKAL-18^3. 

" In this State, in which we are now convened, a trust of no 
inconsiderable importance (far less, indeed, than report has de- 
clared, but yet something considerable,) and, of course, of no 
small responsibility, is likely to devolve on some of us. This 
property, if carefully managed, and justly and conscientiously 
applied, according to the intention for which it was reserved, will 
be a very great blessing to the publick ; to the people generally. 
For their temporal wants mankind are sufiSciently careful and 
diligent in making provision." 

"But money may be given with pious liberality, and for the 
best of purposes, and yet, through carelessness, or ill management, 
the noble intention of the donor be defeated. And there is too 
much reason for fearing that the improper uses sometimes made 
of money given for religious use, and the selfishness, and avari- 
cious cupidity which it excites, have deterred, and continue to 
deter, others from the like liberality. Such misapplication of 
funds given for religious use is more than unjust; it is sacrilegious. 
Let it by us be religiously avoided. What may be our temporal 
interest, or what we may most desire or approve is of no consid- 
eration. Conscientiously and in the fear of God, we are to con- 
sider ourselves as stewards to whom a trust is committed, never 
forgetting that * it is required of stewards that a man be found 
faithful.' Whatever of this nature may be intrusted to our care, 
let us, as the Lord shall give us wisdom, manage and apply with 
all possible prudence and fidelity, and with a sacred regard to the 
donor's intention ; to the honour of God and to the best good of 
mankind." 

" Though the care and appropriation of the lands given for the 
benefit of the Church in this State, do not properly appertain to 
this Convention, it is a subject in which we are all, as Churchmen 
and Christians, concerned ; and it is evidently fitting that the 
subject should be mentioned on this occasion. So far as the 
providence of God, and the laws of our country shall intrust the 
avails of these lands to our management, let us faithfully discharge 
the trust. Due regard should be had to the equitable claim of 
individuals : whatever rents may be realized, should, with the 
utmost prudence and economy, be appropriated for the benefit of 
the people of this State ; and, as far as practicable, to the use of 



JOVRKAL-IS'BS. 231 

the people in the towns where the lands are. No part of the 
funds should be used for erecting houses for publick worship ; for 
houses will decay, and funds/so expended, will, in most cases, be 
lost. To which we may add that there is no part of religious 
expenses, which the people can with more convenience, and do 
more willingly, take upon themselves, than building their own 
Churches. So far as my advice and influence will avail, these 
funds will be employed in teaching the doctrines, and administer- 
ing the holy ordinances of the blessed Redeemer. The doctrines 
which we teach are not, and our manner of teaching should show 
that they are not, the doctrines of a sect, or of any popular re- 
former. Except we depart from the standards of our Church, we 
will preach no other faith than that which was 'once delivered to 
the saints,' and has since by Christians been most generally 
received. We adhere to that order of church government, which 
we verily believe to be primitive and apostolick ; and which has 
most generally prevailed in all the ages of Christianity. Our 
Liturgy, in its language, its sentiments, its doctrines, its adapta- 
tion to social worship, and its suitableness to inspire and express 
rational and fervent devotion, is, to say the least, as near perfec- 
tion as human effort has ever yet arrived. With such advantages, 
great and without excuse must be our negligence, if the funds 
intrusted to our care, do not, to the utmost of their amount, confer 
the greatest of blessings upon the people of this State." 

" And let us lift up our hearts in prayer, and unite our voices 
in praise and thanksgiving to Him, whose preserving mercy has 
conducted us in safety through the perils of another year ; whose 
good providence has caused us to assemble again in this place ; 
and under circumstances how different from those in which we 
met here seven years ago !" 

" To Him, to the God of our salvation, be rendered glory and 
eternal praise. " Gospel Advocate, vol. iv, pp. 9 — 19. 



The following amendments of the Constitution of the Eastern 
Diocese were made by the Convention at Windsor, Sept. 24th. 
1823. As these amendments will affect the action of the Conven- 
tion in this State ; they should be here noticed : 



232 JOURJfAL-1823. 

'•'■ Voted, That the alteration in the second Article of the Con- 
stitution, that the words ' in each of the States by rotation ' be 
struck out, and the words ' such place as shall be agreed upon at 
the preceding convention ' be inserted, which alteration was pro- 
posed at the last meeting of this Convention, be, and the same is 
hereby adopted." 

" Voted, That the alteration proposed at the last meeting of 
this Convention in the same Article, that after the words ' lay 
delegate ' the words 'or delegates not exceeding three,' be in- 
serted, be, and the same is hereby adopted." 

" Voted, That the alteration of the 10th Article of the Consti- 
tution, proposed at the last meeting of this Convention, that the 
word ' biennial ' be struck out, and the word ' annual ' inserted, 
be, and the same is hereby adopted." Gospel Advocate vol. iii, 
p. 345. 



As the case of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 
Foreign Parts vs. the Town of New-Haven and William Wheeler 
has been so often referred to in the foregoing Journal of the Con- 
vention, it may be well to give here some account of it and a syn- 
opsis of the Opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States, 
delivered in February 1823 by Mr. Justice Washington. 

This case came before the Court upon a certificate of a division 
in opinion of the judges of the circuit court for the district of Ver- 
mont. It was an action of ejectment brought by the plaintiffs 
against the defendants, in that court. The material facts, upon 
which the question of law arose, were stated in a special verdict, 
and are as follows : 

By a charter granted by William III., in the thirteenth year of 
his reign, a number of persons, subjects of England, and there re- 
siding, were incorporated bj' the name of " The Society for the 
Propagation of tha Gospel in Foreign Parts," in order that a bet- 
ter provision might be made for the preaching of the Gospel, and 
the maintenance of an orthodox clergy in the colonies of Great 
Britain. The usual corporate powers were bestowed upon this 
society, and, amongst others, it was authorized to purchase estates 
of inheritance to the value of two thousand pounds, per annum, 



JO UEJ^AL—1 823. 233 

and estates for lives or years, and goods and chattels, of any 
value. This charter of incorporation was duly accepted by the 
persons therein named ; and the corporation has ever since exis- 
ted, and now exists, as an organized body politic and corporate, 
in England, all the members thereof being subjects of the king 
of Great Britain. 

On the 2d of November, 1761, a grant was made by the gov- 
ernor of the province of New-Hampshire, in the name of the 
king, by which a certain tract of land, in that province was 
granted to the inhabitants of the said province, and of the king's 
other governments, and to their heirs and assigns, whose names 
were entered on the grant. The tract so granted was to be in- 
corporated into a town, by the name of New-Haven, and to be 
divided into sixty-eight shares, one of which was granted to 
" The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts." The tract of land thus granted, was divided among the 
grantees by sundry votes and proceedings of ft majority of them ; 
which, by the law and usage of Vermont, render such partition 
legal. The premises demanded by the plaintiffs, in this ejectment, 
were set off to them in the above partition, but they had no 
agency in the division, nor was it necessary, by the law and 
usapfe of Vermont, in order to render the same valid. 

On the 30th of October, 1794, the legislature of Vermont 
passed an act, declaring that the rights to land in that State, 
granted under the authority of the British government, previous 
to the Revolution, to " The Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts," were thereby granted severally to the 
respective towns in which such lands lay, and to their use forever. 
The act then proceeds to authorize the selectmen of each town, 
to sue for and recover such lands, if necessary, and to lease them 
out, reserving an annual rent, to be appropriated to the support 
of schools. Under this law, the selectmen of the town of New- 
Haven executed a perpetual lease of a part of the demanded 
premises, to the defendant, William Wheeler, on the 10th of 
February, 1800, reserving an annual rent of five dollars and fifty 
cents; immediately after which, the said Wheeler entered upon 
the land so leased, and has ever since held the possession thereof. 
Similar donations were made, about the same time with the above 



234 J0URMAL~1823. 

grant, to the plaintiffs, of lands lying within the limits of Ver- 
mont, by the governor of New-Hampshire, in the name of the 
king ; but the plaintiffs never entered upon such lands, nor upon 
the demanded premises, nor in any manner asserted a claim or 
title thereto, until the commencement of this suit. 

Upon this special verdict, the judges of the court below were 
divided in opinion upon the question, whether judgment should 
be rendered for the plaintiffs or defendants, and the question was 
thereupon certified to this court. 

Mr. Hopkinson argued the case for the plaintiffs, and Mr. Web- 
ster for the defendants. 

The following is a synopsis of the opinion of the court: 
A Corporation for religious and charitable purposes, which is 
endowed solely by private benefactions, is a private eleemosynary 
corporation, although it is created by a charter from the govern- 
ment. 

The capacity of private individuals, British subjects, or of cor- 
porations, created by the Crown, in this country, or in Great 
Britain, to hold lands or other property in this country, was not 
affected by the Revolution. 

The proper courts in this country will interfere to prevent an 
abuse of the trusts confided to British corporations holding lands 
here to charitable uses, and will aid in enforcing the due execntion 
of the trusts; but neither those courts, nor the local legislature 
where the lands lie, can adjudge a forfeiture of the franchises of 
the foreign corporation, or of its property. 

The property of British corporations, in this country, is pro- 
tected by the sixth article of the Treaty of peace of 1783, in the 
same manner as that of natural persons ; and their title, thus 
protected, is confirmed by the ninth article of the treaty of 1794, 
so that it could not be forfeited by any intermediate legislative 
act, or other proceeding for the defect of alienage. 

The termination of a treaty, by war, does not divest rights of prop- 
erty already vested under it. 

Nor do treaties, in general, become extinguished, ipso facto, by 
war between the two governments. Those stipulating for a perma- 
nent arrangement of territorial, and other national rights are, at 
most, suspended during the war, and revive at the peace, unless 



J0UR:^J.L-1824. 235 

they are waived by the parties, or new and repugnant stipulations 

are made. 

The act of the Legislature of Vermont, of the 30th of October 
1794, granting the lands in that State, belonging to " The Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," to the respec- 
tive towns in which the lands lie, is void, and conveys no title 
under it. 6 Curtis, 483-494. (8 Wheaton, 464.) 

The General Assembly of Vermont, at the session thereof in the 
Fall of 1823 passed the following Resolution, having respect to the 
foregoing decision, and to what further means the ingenuity of 
counsel could devise to impoverish the Church : 

» Resolved, That the Governor and Council concurring herein, 
that his excellency, the Governor of this State be requested to 
make satisfactory inquiry of the counsel, employed by the State, to 
defend the suit against New-Haven, lately determined before the 
supreme court of the United States ; or in any other way, he shall 
deem expedient, to ascertain the true situation of the rights of land, 
originally granted in this State, ' for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts;' and if said determination settles the title to said 
rights, in every respect ; and to communicate the result of said 
inquiry to the next session of the Legislature.- Concurred Nov. 3. 
1823." Acts of the Legislature of Vermont, 1823, p. 31. 



1824. 

Bethel, Wednesday, June 23d, 1824. 
This being the day designated by the Constitution for the 
Annual Meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church, of the State of Vermont, the Kight Rev. 
Bishop of the Eastern Diocese, a number of Clergymen and 
Lay Delegates from several of the Churches in this State 
assembled at 9 o'clock, a. m. in Christ Church, Bethel. 

Present : 
Right Rev. Alexandek V. Griswold, President ex officio. 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Bethel and Bethesda 
Churches, Arlington, and Zion Church, Manchester. 



236 J0TJRKAL-182Jf. 

Rev. George LEONARD,Rectorof St. Paul's Church, Windsor. 
Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, 
Middlehury. 

Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelhurne. 
Rev. Elijah Brainard, Deacon, Missionary. 
Rev. Samuel B. Shaw, Deacon, Minister of Christ Church, 
Guilford. 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials as 
Lay Delegates, and took their seats : 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD : 
Dana Hyde. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Dudley Chase, , Thomas Russel, 

Salmon C. Cotton. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY : 
Cteorge Cleveland, Dorastus Wooster. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 
James Hawley. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

Luke Dewing. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY : 
RuFUS Smith. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 

Philo Hosford. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET: 
Daniel Fitch. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS : 

Raymond Hotchkiss. 

The Rev. Joel Clap was appointed Secretary, 
On motion by the Rev. Mr. Bronson, Resolved, That vis- 
ting Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church, who 



JO TJBKAL-1 824. 22n 

may be present during the session of this Convention, be 
admitted to honorary seats in the same. 

The Kev. Nathan B. Burgess, from the Diocese of Connec- 
ticut, and the Rev. Pahner Dyer, Deacon, from the Diocese 
of New- York, accordingly appeared and took their seats. 

The Parochial Reports being called for, the following were 
presented and read : 

BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

ABRAUAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 5 ; Marriages, 5 ; Funerals, 9 ; Communicants, 80. 
ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 1 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 5 ; Communicants, 35. 
ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH, SANDGATE. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, MINISTER. 

Communicants, 31. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET. 

PALMER DYER, MINISTER. 

This Parish was reorganized on the 9th of December, 1823. 
The number of Communicants is about fifteen. Within a fort- 
night after the Minister had the pleasure of assisting at the 
reorganization of this Church, he was called to mourn, with his 
brethren, over the grave of the Senior Warden, one of its foun- 
ders and supporters. 

The Church lands in this town are valuable. The town, how- 
ever, is yet unwilling to surrender its claims ; so that we do not 
at present derive any benefit from them. The avails of them are 
much wanted, and depended upon, by our few Churchmen, to 
enable them to support the administration of Christian and 
ApostoHc ordinances. 



238 JOURJrAL-1824- 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS. 

PALMER DYER, MINISTER. 

On the 27th of April in the present year, I had the pleasure 
to assist in reorganizing the Church in Wells, named St. Paul's, 
as will appear from the Certificate this day presented by the Lay 
Delegate. Burials, 1 ; number of Communicants about 20. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

S. BRENTON SHAW, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 2 : Marriages, 2 ; Funerals, 5 ; Communicants, 46 ; 
Families which regularly attend Church about 70 ; Sunday 
Scholars, in both Churches, 52. 

This Parish has suffered during the past year from removals, and 
feels severely the pressure of the times. Its trust, however, being 
in the Great Head of the Church, and continuing firm "in the 
unity of the faith and in the bonds of peace," its prospects are 
by no means discouraging. The congregation at the West 
Church has materially increased during the past year, while none 
have withdrawn from the East, except those who have removed 
to other places. Arrangements have been made to procure a 
parsonage house during the present season. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

From June, 1822 to June 1823, 7 Baptisms; 2 Burials; 1 
Marriage. From June, 1823 to June, 1824, 3 Baptisms ; 1 Bur- 
ial ; 2 Marriages, and two persons confirmed. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, WEATHERSFIELD. 

GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

One Baptism. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

BENJAMIN B. SMITH, RECTOR. 

During the past year the external circumstances of this Parish 
have not essentially changed. It is hoped that a gradual and 



JOURJfAL-1824. 239 

permanent improvement has taken place ; precisely such as might 
have been expected in the ordinary course of Providence, though 
by no means as conspicuous and striking as has been earnestly 
implored as a special favour from God. Baptisms since the last 
report, but four; and Funerals only two. The number of Com- 
municants, by means of the addition of two new members, the 
return of several to the village, and the accession of others who 
had been elsewhere communicants, has increased to nearly forty. 
The Sunday School and Bible Classes excite interest and promise 
to be useful. One favorable indication ought thankfully to be 
noticed. It does not indeed relate, as devoutly could be wished, 
to the most important of all subjects, still it is gratifying to per- 
ceive an increased disposition to examine the claims, and prize 
the excellencies of the Episcopal Church. 

The demand for tracts, and for more elaborate works, in relation 
to its distinctive principles is very great, and has evidently in- 
creased ; and in the most unexpected quarters, au attachment to 
its Liturgy has been discovered. We have good reason therefore 
to hope, that God is beginning at least, to give us favour in the 
sight of the people, and we trust it will prove to have been in 
richest love to their souls. 

TEINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 5, infants 7) — 12 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 2 ; 
Communicants, 71. 

The state of this Parish presents no peculiarly interesting 
feature. The congregation has been gradually increasing, and 
it is hoped that God has, in some measure, blessed the means of 
grace, to the advancement of pure and undefiled religion among 
the people. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms (adults 2, infants 10) — 12 ; Funerals, 1 ; Communi- 
cants, 32. 



240 JO TJBXAL—l 824. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONART. 

Baptisms, infants, 2 ; Communicants, 29 ; 

CHURCH, ENOSBURGH. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Communicants, 10. 

These Churches have been destitute of the regular and stated 
services of a Clergyman since the much lamented death of the ' 
Rev. Mr. Gray. Divine Service has been regularly conducted by 
Lay Readers, in the two former, during the vrhole period, except 
when occasionally supplied by a Clergyman, and recently in the 
latter, and we have reason to believe that the Lord has in some 
degree blessed the same. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, MIS.SIONART. 

Baptisms, (adults, T, infants, 8) 9 ; Communicants, 68. 

With a very commendable zeal, the members of this Parish 
have, at the expense of very great exertion, completed the Church 
edifice in which we are now assembled ; in which the services of 
the Church are regularly performed, by a Lay Reader, whose 
labour of love has been richly repaid by the constant, though 
gradual increase of the Congregation, and as we fondly hope, the 
spiritual condition of the Parish is improving. 

The Rev. Mr. Brainard has occasionally officiated in this 
Church during the past season. 

The Rev. Mr. Burgess, from the Diocese of Connecticut, has 
kindly officiated two Sundays, and assisted on the third. 

The situation of these vacant Parishes presents a very powerful 
appeal to the missionary spirit of the friends of our Church in 
this State. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

JOHN RICHARDSON, WARDEN. 

Funeral, 1 child ; Communicants, 13. 



JOUBJ^AL-1824. 241 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

JAMES IIAWLEY, LAY READER. 

Communicants, 62 ; additions within the past year, 2, one hy 
removal. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

JOHN S. GALLUP, SOCIETY CLERK. 

The state of this Church is about the same as last year. 



The following Committees were appointed : 

STANDING COMMITTEE : 

Eev. Abraham Bronson, Kev. George Leonard, Rev. Carl- 
ton Chase, Rev. Benjamin B. Smith and Rev. Joel Clap. 

PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE: 

Hon. Daniel Chipman, Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard, Do- 
rastus Wooster and Joshua Isham, Esqrs. 

On motion, the following amendment to the Constitution, 
proposed at the last annual meeting of the Convention was 
adopted : 

After the word " Convention," in the second line of the 
fourth Article in the printed copy, to strike out the words, 
"and when there is to be a session of the General Convention 
within the ensuing year," and insert the word "also." After 
the words "delegation shall," in the fourth line, to insert 
the word "annually." Also, in the fifth line, after the 
words, "this State in" to strike out the words "that body, 
also as long as this State shall belong to the Eastern Diocese, 
a delegation shall be appointed to attend each Diocesan 
Convention at the next preceding annual Convention, or at 
some meeting specially warned for that purpose," and insert 
the words "the General Convention." Also in the 11th line 
of said Article, to strike out the words "or Diocesan." 



242 JOUBJ^AL-1824. 

The following Report was received, read and accepted : 
The Committee appointed at the last Convention "to report 
a uniform mode of election of Lay Delegates from the several 
Parishes in this State to its annual Convention, and also a 
form of certificate of said election," beg leave to report, 
Thai the Lay Delegates shall in all cases either reside in the 
Parish which they represent, or contribute to its funds, and 
be chosen at some regular meeting of the Parish or Society, 
or at least at some meeting of the Wardens and Vestry, 
of which previous public notice shall have been given ; and 
that the form of certificate shall run in the following words, 
or others of similar import : 

" This is to certify, That A. B. C. D. etc. have been duly 
appointed Lay Delegates to represent Church, (Par- 
ish or Society) of in the next State Convention to be 

holden in on the day of ." Which 

certificate shall be signed either by the Clerk of the Parish, 

Society, or Vestry, for the time being the Rector of 

the Parish or by one of the Wardens, All which is 

respectfully submitted. 

BENJAMIN B. SMITH, ) c„n,^ittee 
DANIEL CHIPMAN, \ Committee. 

The Convention adjourned for the purpose of attending 
Divine Service. 

Christ Church was then consecrated by the Right Rever- 
end Bishop. Morning Prayers were read by the Rev. Mr. 
Bronson. The Sermon was preached by the Rt. Rev. Bish- 
op, who proceeded to the administration of the Holy 
Communion, in which he was assisted by the Rev. Mr. 
Leonard. After which the business of the Convention was 
resumed. 

Adjourned until 4 o'clock this evening. 

Wednesday, 4 o'clock p. m. The Convention assembled 
for the purpose of attending Divine Service. Evening 



JOURJ^J.L-1824. 243 

Prayers were read by the Rev. Mr. Shaw, and a sermon 
preached by the Rev. Mr. Smith, after which the Conven- 
tion proceeded to business. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Bronson, Resolved, That the 
next annual meeting of this Convention be holden at 
St. Albans. 

The following Delegates to the General Convention were 
then appointed : The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Benj 
B. Smith, Rev. Joel Clap and Rev. Sam'l B. Shaw — 
Clerical. Daniel Chipman, Dudley Chase, Jonathan H. 
Hubbard, and Dana Hyde — Laymen. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That the 
Agents and Attorneys of the "Society for the Propagation of 
the Gospel in Foreign Parts," for the management of the 
Society lands in this State, be, and they hereby are reques- 
ted to report to the next Convention, a full and minute 
account of the condition of the business and funds at their 
disposal. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That a 
Committee be appointed to report to the next Convention 
the expediency of establishing a Contingent Fund to be at 
the disposal of the Convention, and the best mode of raising 
and proportioning said Fund. 

The following gentlemen were appointed upon said Com- 
mittee : Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, George Cleveland, and 
Rev. Joel Clap. 

The Rev. Samuel B. Shaw was appointed to preach before 
the next Convention, and the Rev. Abraham Bronson his 
substitute. 

On motion, voted. That the Secretary be directed to 
publish the Journal of the proceedings of this Convention. 

Adjourned, without day. 
A true copy. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



244 JO VRKAL-1 824. 

THE 4Tn ARTICLE OF THE CONSTITUTION AS AMENDED BY THE CON- 
VENTION ON THE 23d day OF JuNE, A. D. 1824. 

A President, Secretary and Standing Committee shall be chosen 
at every annual meeting of the Convention ; also the requisite 
Delegation shall be annually appointed to represent this State in the 
General Convention. 

Provided, however, That no person shall be a member of the 
Standing Committee, or shall represent this State in the General 
Convention, unless he be a regular Communicant in the Church. 
Provided, also, That when the Bishop of the Diocese shall be pres- 
ent in the Convention, he shall ex-officio, be President. 

The Convention may from time to time, if deemed expedient, 
appoint a Prudential Committee to superintend the prudential 
concerns of the Church. 



MEETING OF THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

The morning after the meeting of the Convention, a few mem- 
bers of the Missionary Society met in Christ Church, Bethel, for 
the purpose of electing officers, and transacting the annual busi- 
ness of the Society. 

With very mortifying and bitter feelings, it was observed that 
very few of the influential Laymen then assembled manifested 
sufficient interest in the Society, even to attend its hasty meeting. 
The business was transacted by so small a number that they did 
not presume to make the least change in any of its officers or 
arrangements. But the managers, affected to the heart at the 
total insensibility to this great and most desirable object, have em- 
boldened themselves to take this method of announcing the low state 
of this Association, and have presumed so far as to occupy a 
blank page upon the Journals, with this hasty appeal to the friends 
of the Church, in the hope of exciting some increased degree of 
attention to this neglected subject. And upon the pressure of the 
occasioi), they have resolved to adopt the following measures for 
carrying their purpose into effect. 

1. They propose to make provisions, that for the future a Ser- 
mon shall be preached before the Society at its annual meeting, 



J0UR:N'J.L-1824. 245 

the day after that appointed for the meetmg of the Convention, 
and for taking up a contribution at that time for its funds. 

2. They hereby appeal to their brethren in the Ministry, with 
the earnest request that they will take into consideration the vote 
of the Convention of 1822, by which they were desired to take up 
contributions in their several Parishes for Missionary purposes, 
after preaching upon the subject ; and beg leave further to suggest 
the expediency of having these collections at the communion sea- 
sons of Christmas and Whitsunday. And they are exceedingly 
desirous that every communicant in the Church will feel called up- 
on, either to save or earn a specific sum, to be consecrated more es- 
pecially to this holy purpose. 

3. And they hereby further intimate to the Agents of the 
Society in the several Parishes that they are preparing a Circular 
to be addressed to them, in the confident hope that they will be 
prevailed upon to procure a much larger number of subscribers, 
than has yet, from any Parish, been reported. 

The Managers are impressed with the vast importance and in- 
creasing interest of the Society whose concerns they superintend, 
as it regards the influence which it is capable of exerting in the 
immediate state of our infant Church. And they would be want- 
ing in their duty to this Society and the Church at large, if they 
did not earnestly call upon Episcopalians, now if ever, to exert 
themselves in its behalf. By prompt and vigorous exertions— by 
frequent and liberal contributions, the Managers will be empow- 
ered to supply the wants of many of our people, whom it would be 
exceedingly unfeeling to neglect. They therefore submit the 
case to the friends of the Church, with humble prayers that their 
hearts and hands may be opened on this pressing and important 
occasion. 

Middlebury, June 29th, 1824. 



The following paragraphs in the Address of Bishop Griswold, 
delivered before the Convention of the Eastern Diocese held at 
Portland, Maine, Septemper 29th, 1824 have respect to the Church 
in Vermont and belong to the Journal of this year : — 



246 JO UBMAL-1 824. 

" My Friends and Brethren : 

The rapid course of revolving time, has again, and thus soon 
brought about the season most interesting to this Diocese ; the 
meeting of its annual Convention. Once more are we called to 
unite in thankful acknowledgements to the Father of Mercies, that 
we have been preserved through the vicissitudes and perils of 
another year, and are permitted to assemble at this, the appoint- 
ed time and place. 

" My labours, of which it becomes my duty now to render you 
some brief account, have been no less abundant than in former 
years. Almost the whole of our Churches have been visited within 
the year ; and in my visitations, I have preached from once to four 
times, and in the greatest part of them have administered Confirma- 
tion, and the Lord's Supper. A short statement of what is most 
singular or necessary for information, will be all that it is expedient, 
or that you will desire. " 

"After the adjournment of our last Convention, at Windsor, in 
Vermont, I pursued my journey to the northern boundary, and 
through all the western parts of that State, ' confirming the 
Churches.' Excepting a few families in Pavvlet and Wells, who 
attend the ministrations at Granville, in the State of New- York ; 
a few also in Sandgate, who met us at Arlington, and the Church 
at Guilford since visited, my tour was then extended to every 
Parish, however small, in that State. I received much kindness 
and aid from my clerical brethren, one or more of whom accom- 
panied me. all the way, and often took a part of the services; and 
by the people in every Parish, and indeed, throughout the Diocese, 
have I been received, and treated with much kindness and hospi- 
tality. May the Lord remember them for good." 

"Saturday, the 27th of September, 1823, we reached Bethel, 
where I preached in the evening. The next day I preached 
twice; confirmed twenty-two, and gave the Communion to about 
sixty ; which, considering how recently they had been organized 
as a Parish, and how shortly before there had been a Confirmation 
in the same place, was highly encouraging. Owing to sickness 
among the workmen, their new Church was not sufficiently finished 
for consecration ; but this disappointment, as a wise and good 
Providence has overruled, has, we have good reason to believe, 



JO URJfAL-1 82 A. 247 

'turned out for the furtherance of the Gospel ;' — it caused a post- 
ponement of the consecration till the meeting of the Vermont 
Convention at Bethel, when we had one of the most interesting 
seasons that I have ever witnessed. Great praise is due to the 
liberality and pious zeal of that people, in building a house to 
God's honour, and for the love they uniformly manifest for His 
holy worship." 

" In the evening, we proceeded to Randolph, where I delivered 
a third discourse. We had a large congregation, and a very 
hospitable reception." 

" In pursuing our journey, we passed through Jericho, where I 
was for the first time informed, a Mr. Garlic, an Episcopal minis- 
ter, once officiated. A remnant of his parish, it was said, yet 
remains; but the appointments which I had previously made, 
would not admit of my staying, as my desire was, to obtain more 
certain information." 

" In Cambridge I found a few Episcopalians ; spake to them 
the word of God, and administered Confirmation and the Lord's 
Supper. In Enosburgh, also, I was invited to preach; and there 
too are a few attached to our Church, from conviction of its supe- 
riour excellence. This was my first visit to the two last named 
places ; a missionary's labours in them would be well bestowed. 
In no part of this Diocese, do I find the people more generally 
disposed to receive the pure doctrines of Christ, and to reverence 
the ordinances of His religion. Those ministers of Christ, whose 
chief desire is to build up His kingdom, and to be instrumental in 
the salvation of their fellow men, cannot find a more promising 
field for their labours, than the north-western parts of Vermont." 

" On the 2d of October, the new edifice in Berkshire was 
consecrated, with all the services appropriate and usual on such 
occasions, by the name of Calvary Church. Here, as, also, in 
Montgomery, are a pious, zealous people, who, since the lamented 
death of the Reverend Mr. Gray, have been almost wholly desti- 
tute of the Christian Ordinances. The Reverend Mr. Clap, to 
whose active zeal, we are much indebted, officiates a small part of 
the time in these, and some other vacant parishes." 

"The divisions and discouragements resulting from the late 
unhappy difBculties in Sheldon and Fairfield, still in some degree 



248 JOUBJfJ.L-1824. 

remain ; but we hope they are gradually subsiding. The Parish 
in Sheldon, have given a very pleasing evidence of returning har- 
mony, by uniting, at the present time, in building a Church ; but 
unhappily the parish in Fairfield, are also destitute of a minister." 

" In St. Albans there is a pleasing prospect that the erection of 
a Church will soon be commenced. For the first time, I visited 
Swanton, which is but a few miles distant from St. Albans. The 
few Episcopalians there, have united with Christians of three other 
denominations, in building a house for religious worship, each 
denomination to have the use of it one- fourth of the time. Such 
a union, through the corruption of our nature, too naturally tends 
to disunion : God grant that this case may be an exception. These 
two places are also destitute of any one to 'labour in word and doc- 
trine.' Where we should have four Clergymen constantly officiat- 
ing, we have not more than one. Let us at least continue our 
prayers to ' the Lord of the harvest that He will send labourers 
into his harvest' in those parts." 

"The increase of the Church in Shelburne, both in numbers and 
zeal gave iis reason to ' thank God and take courage.' Twenty- 
seven presented themselves for Confirmation and a large number at 
the Lord's Table. Mr. Clap, had kindly accompanied me all the 
way from Windsor to this his Parish : but here other engage- 
ments called him another way." 

" In Middlebury, through the Lord's blessing on the labours of 
the Reverend Mr. Smith, the prospects of the Church are bright- 
ening. In Rutland I was happy in finding that its hopes are not 
wholly extinguished." 

" It was highly gratifying to find in Vermont, several pious 
young men whose views are to the sacred ministry. This is the 
more encouraging from the hope that they will bestow their labours 
in that State, where they are so much needed; aud not the less 
certainly from the fact, that a very considerable number of the 
most able, and zealous of our Clergy in the United States, have origi- 
nated from Vermont." 

" On the 15th of June, 1824, I comtnenced another tour. On 
the 16tb, I met, in Trinity Church, Boston, with the Convention of 
Massachusetts ; and on the 23d, in company with the Rev. Mr. 
Leonard, of Windsor, arrived again at Bethel, in Vermont, where 



JOUBiN-AL-lSU- 249 

we had the pleasure of meeting many friends and brethren from 
various parts. The 23d was one of the happiest days of my hfe. 
At the hour of nine in the morning, the Convention of Vermont 
met in the new Church, where already the people were assembling 
for the religious services which were appointed to commence at 
eleven. The congregation was very numerous ; nearly one-half 
of them could not enter the Church. After it was solemnly 
consecrated to Almighty God, to be henceforth sacred to His Holy 
worship, and a Sermon was delivered, prepared for the occasion. 
Confirmation followed ; after, which a very large number united 
in the Holy Communion. The people appeared to be deeply 
interested, and were unusually attentive ; and though the other 
services had been long, during which a great part of the people 
had stood, there were many more remained through the ministra- 
tion of this Sacrament than the Church could contain ; — a fact 
which authorized the belief, that something better than curiosity 
had detained them ; and that they did ' hunger and thirst after 
righteousness : ' mine chiefly was the fault, if they 'were sent 
empty away.' The Convention was adjourned to the hour of 
four in the afternoon, when Divine Services were again performed : 
Prayers by the Rev. Mr. Shaw, and the Convention Sermon by 
the Rev. Mr. Smith. Two couples were also joined in marriage. 
Bethel is one of our most important stations for a clergyman; 
where the labours of one duly qualified for that place, would, we 
may well hope, be exceedingly useful." 

" The general state of the Church in Vermont, though clouded 
by some serious difficulties, is such as calls for thankfulness to its 
Divine Head. Some new Parishes have been recently formed. 
Those who are already and decidedly Episcopalians, are generally 
and comparatively speaking, pious, exemplary Christians, and 
attached to the Church from sincere conviction and conscientious 
principles. The few ministers also, who are labouring among 
them are, in a large proportion, we may well believe of those, 
who, as St. Paul says, are 'worthy of double honour.' Where 
ministers and people unite in faith and zeal-in^ holiness and 
prayer, the Lord's work will pro.sper in their hands." 

""On the 26th I reached Guilford, and the next day which was 
the second Sunday after Trinity, assisted by my Reverend breth- 



250 JOURMAL-1824- 

ren, Bronson, Strong, Chase and Jones, admitted the Rev. Samuel 
B. Shaw, Deacon, to the Order of the Priestiiood, he having a 
title from tliat parisli. The services were such as are usual on the 
like occasions. A few only were confirmed; but a large congrega- 
tion appeared to 'rejoice in the Lord,' and many of them, it was 
hoped, were 'filled with good things.'" 

" On the 8th of August I held a confirmation in Newport and 
also an ordination, when Joseph S. Covell was admitted to the 
Order of Deacons. The day following that of his ordination, Mr. 
Covell set oflffor Vermont, where I suppose he has since officiated. 
On the 15th of the same month Henry W. Ducachet, M. D. was 
ordained, Deacon." 

"The Candidates admitted in the course of the year, are Thomas 
S. W. Mott, Carolus C. Brainard, Southerland Douglass and Louis 
M'Donald." 

" The whole number confirmed in the year is 552." 

" Let us carefully endeavor to cultivate peace among ourselves. 
It is when cemented together as a band of brethren ; when, ban- 
ishing pride and selfishness, all mean and narrow views, we are 
firmly united in whatever shall honour our Divine Master, and pro- 
mote true religion, that we may hope for God's blessing. Did we 
possess that Christian love, which ought to glow in our breasts, 
what would exceed the pleasure which we should feel in conversing 
together on these very interesting occasions ! Li all our delibera- 
tions and intercourse, at the present time and on all occasions, let 
us follow after the things which make for peace. Let nothing like 
party spirit be found amongst us. In order to exclude so baneful 
an evil, let us be very cautious how we use invidious epethets and 
distinctive appellations which engender strife. Let all be orthodox 
and all be evangelical." 

" May the Lord be with us, and so inspire our counsels with 
wisdom, and unite our hearts in love, that both now and ever, we 
may do His will and promote His glory." Gospel Advocate, vol. v, 
pp. 113—119, 150—162, 181—187. 



The subject of Church property was this year brought before 
the Legislature by Governor Van Ness in his inaugural Speech, 
and received much attention. 



J0UR^''AL-1824. 251 

" Under the Resolution respecting the rights of land originally 
granted to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in For- 
eign Parts, a correspondence has taken place with the Hon. Dan- 
iefwehster, the counsel employed on behalf of the State to de- 
fend the suit against the town of New-Haven, for one of those 
rights, which will without delay be laid before you. " Journal, 
1824, p. 14. 

November 1st, the following communication was received in 
the House from his Excellency, the Governor, viz. 

"MoNTPELiEH, Nov. 1. 1824. 
Sir, _ I herewith communicate to the General Assembly, cop- 
ies of' the correspondence with the Hon. Daniel Webster, on the 
subject of the land granted to the Society for the Propagation of 
the Gospel in Foreign Parts. I will also state for the information 
of the members, that the sum of nine hundred dollars has, at dif- 
ferent times, been appropriated to defray the expenses of the suit 
against the town of New-Haven ; and that of this sum, Mr. Ed- 
mond, the late agent of the State, has drawn from the Treasury, 
six hundred and fifty dollars; four hundred dollars of which have 
been paid to Mr. Webster, and two hundred and fifty dollars, re- 
tained by him. I find that two hundred Dollars were paid, by 
ao-reement, for the services of Mr. Webster, in attending the 
Circuit Court at Windsor, in May, 1820 ; and that he has received 
the same amount towards his fees for arguing the cause before 
the Supreme Court at Washington. 

The amount which Mr. Webster still seems to consider his due, 
is three hundred dollars ; and the sum remaining in the Treasury 
is two hundred and fifty dollars. 
I have the honour to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. P. VAN NESS. 
The Hon. George E. Wales, 

Speaker of the House of Representatives." 

The documents accompanying the above are as follows : — 



252 JOTJEKAL-1824. 

" Vermont Executive Department, 
Burlington, July 24, 1824. 
Sir, — I have the honour to enclose to you a copy of a Resolu- 
tion passed by the Legislature of this State, in relation to the 
lands originally granted to the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, and to request that you will have the 
goodness to communicate to me your opinion on the question pro- 
posed therein, as soon as your convenience will permit. It is im- 
portant for the State to ascertain, whether any further steps can 
be taken to defend, what it believes to be its rights, or whether 
by the decision which has been made, it is precluded from any 
further defence. 

Your absence from home, during almost the whole time since 
the last session of our Legislature, has been the cause of my not 
writing to you sooner on this subject. 
I have the honour to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant. 

C. P. VAN NESS. 
Hon. Daniel Webster. 

"Boston, July 31st, 1824. 
Sir, — I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your 
letter, of the 24th of this month, enclosing a copy of a Resolution, 
passed by the General Assembly of Vermont, in October last, re- 
questing you to make satisfactory inquiry of the counsel, employed 
to defend the suit against New Haven, etc. to ascertain the true 
situation of the rights of land, originally granted to the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts. 

You request of me my opinion on this question ; but the ques- 
tion is so general, that I cannot well understand what is requested. 
The decision of the Court has been published, and is no doubt, in 
the hands of the Assembly. I have no means of knowing the 
opinions of the Judges, farther than that decision contains, except 
some slight and occasional remarks, by some of them, such as 
would not authorize any important conclusion to be drawn. If 
there be any question, of a more precise nature, in regard to 
. which I can give any information, I shall have great pleasure in 
complying with your wishes. 



J0UBJfAL-18U' 253 

I take this occasion to say, that my last sundry letters to the 
Agent of the State, on the subject of this question, were none of 
them favoured with an answer. 

I am, Sir, with very great regard. 

Your obedient servant, 

DANIEL WEBSTER. 

His Excellency, C. P. Van Ness." 

"Vermont Executive Department, 
Burlington, Sept. 18, 1824. 
Sir —Your letter of the 31st of July, in answer to mine of the 
24th of the same month, was received some time since, and 
would have been before replied to, but for the delay occasioned in 
Tbtaining from the representatives of the late Mr. Edmond the 
letters t^ which you allude, as not having been answered, and 
which I wished to see before writing you agam. 

The Resolution of the Legislature of tins State, acopy o 
which was forwarded to you, in my first letter, requires that 
inquiry be made, as to 'the true situation' of the rights of land n 
question, and also, 'whether the decision which has been made 
settles tie title to said rights in every respect.' And I observed 
that it was important for the State to ascertam, whether any fur- 
ther steps can be taken to defend what it believes to be its ng^it 
or whether by the decision which has been made, it is precluded 
from any further defence. 

The particular object of my communication was to ascertain^ 
whether in your opinion, the decision of the Supeme Court con- 
clusively settled the principle, in relation to all tl-e righ s o 
Ld- or whether you could suggest any question, which had not 
been raised in the cause which has been tried, and on which you 
should think the State could place sufficient reliance, to justify the 
defence of another suit for a different right. Not being aware 
Sir, that I can propose any question 'of a more precise nature I 
ho^e you will consider the inquiry, with this exp anation, suffi- 
ciently definite, to admit of your favoring me with an answer 

'^I would likewise request that yon would have the goodness to 
forward to me your account against the State, that measures may 



254 JOLBJ^AL-1824. 

be taken for the payment of any balance that may remain due to 
you. The State having made, what it understood to be, tlie neces- 
sary appropriation, your claim was supposed to have been paid, 
until by an examination of your correspondence with Mr. Edmond, 
the fact appears otherwise. 

I have the honour to be, 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

C. P. VAX NESS. 
Hon. Daniel Webster." 

"Vermont Executive Department, 
MoxTPELiER, Oct. 20th, 1824. 
Sir: — As the session of the Legislature of this State commen- 
ced, some days since, I beg leave to request that you will have 
the goodness to favour me with an answer to my last letter as 
soon as practicable, 

I am, very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, \ 

C. P. VAN NESS. 
Hon. Daniel Webster." 

"Boston, October 26, 1824. 

Sir : — I am afraid that I cannot make any suggestions, at 
present, which would be essentially useful to the Legislature of 
Vermont, respecting the glebe lands. What the Court has decided 
appears from the case, as do also the grounds of that decision. 

It is now some time since the case was argued, and my atten- 
tion has not been particularly called back to it, until your com- 
munications. I wrote the former agent frequently without receiv- 
ing any answer. 

Upon reviewing the case, I do not find myself able to suggest 
any particular course, for which I would be responsible. Since 
the receipt of your letter, a month or two ago, I have not had 
suflScient leisure to consider the case maturely, and as it ought to 
be considered. My health has not been good, and I have spent 
much of the time, since my return from Washington, in travelling 
for its improvement. My general impression has been, that the 
State might adopt some mode, to assert its own right over the 



JOURJ^AL-1824. 255 

lands, or to control those who hold it. But what this mode should 
be, requires, to confess the truth, more consideration than I have 

g-iven the case. , . . ^ t e^-^ 

The jreneral idea which I entertain, is, that it is competent for 

the State autliority to try the question of forfeiture, for abuse, or 

non-user, or for any other sufBcient cause, and to pronounce a 

iudc-ment of forfeiture. , , t *• 

As to my account, the arrangement made, was, that I was to 
receive five hundred dollars for attending to the cause at \\ ash- 
ineton I received either two hundred or three hundred dollars, 
(I think the former, my receipt will show,) and although I believe 
I wrote for the rest, it was not sent. For the present I would 
not wish the balance sent to me. 

I shall endeavour to keep this subject in my mmd, and if any 
of your friends should be this way, before I go south, 1 will 
cheerfully give a day to a consideration on this subject. 
Yours, with very true regard, 

DANIEL WEBSTER. 

His Excellency C. P. Van Ness. 

Governor of Vermont. 



The foregoing letters being read, on motion of Mr. Stephen 
Haight, Monkton, they were referred to a Committee of four 
members of the House to join such committee as the Council 

should appoint. t. c iv 

The following gentlemen were appointed on the part ot tne 
House- Titus Hutchinson, Woodstock, Heman Allen, Milton, 
Stuart Brown, Washington, and Wolcott H. Keeler, Chittenden. 
Journal, 1824, pp. 108—110, 117. 

Nov. 17th, This Committee made the following report : 
"To THE General Assembly now sitting : 

Your Committee to whom was referred the communication ot 
his Excellency, accompanying certain communications from the 
Hon. Daniel Webster, concerning the rights of land, in this State, 
heretofore granted to the Society for the Propagation of the Gos- 
pel in Foreign Parts, respectfully recommend the passing of the two 

accompanying Bills, marked A and B. 

^ ^ ^ C. LANGDON, Chairman." 



256 JOUBJfAL-1824. 

These two Bills — the first entitled " An Act, in addition to an 
act directing the mode of taking forfeitures of grants and charters," 
and the second entitled, "An Act, appointing an Agent for certain 
purposes," had at once the first and second reading, and, during 
the next day, passed through the usual stages without opposition. 
Journal, 1824, pp. 209, 218, 224, 225, 230. 

The "Act in addition to an act directing the mode of taking 
forfeitures of grants and charters," specially designed to afiiect the 
Society lands, was the following : 

'■'■It is hcrely enacted ly the General Assembly of the State of 
Vermont^ That the provisions of the act aforesaid, shall, hereafter 
extend to all cases whatever relating to charters or grants of land 
lying in this State." Passed Nov. 18, 1824. Acts of the Legis- 
lature of Vermont, 1824, p. 26. 

The " Act, appointing an Agent for certain purposes," was the 
following : 

"■It is hereby enacted ly the General Assemlly of the State of 
Vermont^ That Titus Hutchinson he and hereby is appointed an 
Agent, with full powers to ascertain necessary facts, and procure 
necessary papers, to show the right this State has to take the 
forfeiture of the grants of the several rights of land in this State, 
originally granted to the Society in England for the Propagation 
of the Gospel in Foreign Parts ; and if he shall conceive there is a 
fair prospect of obtaining a decree of forfeiture of their rights, to 
commence and prosecute a scire facias for some one right of said 
land, in the name of the people of this State and prosecute the 
same to final judgment: and a sum, not exceeding the sum of one 
thousand dollars, is hereby appropriated to defray the expenditures 
of the same ; and the said Agent may draw upon the Treasurer 
from time to time, for the same, as may be necessary." Passed 
Nov. 18, 1824. Acts of the Legislature of Vermont, 1824, p. 32. 

On the same day that the foregoing Acts were passed, the 
following Resolution, introduced by Mr. Stephen Haight, Monkton, 
was also passed : 

"Resolved, The Governor and Council concurring herein. That 
His Excellency, the Governor be and he is hereby authorized and 
requested to appoint some suitable person to settle with the admin- 



J0VRKAL-1S25. 257 

istrator of David Edmond Esq. deceased, late Agent of this State 
in the suit in favor of the Society for propagating the Gospel in 
Foreign Parts against the town of New-Haven ; and to settle with 
the Hon. Daniel Webster, counsel in said cause; and the Treasurer 
of this State is directed to pay said Agent the balance of the 
appropriation heretofore made for that purpose : and the Agent, 
so to be appointed is hereby directed to make report of his doings, 
in the premises, to the next session of the Legislature." Journal, 
1824, pp. 225, 230. 



1825. 

Wednesday, June 23d, 1825. 
This being the day designated, by the Constitution, for 
the Annual Meeting of the Convention of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in Vermont, a number of the Clergy &,nd 
Lay Delegates, from several of the Parishes in the State, 
assembled at St. Albans, at 9 o'clock, a. m. 

Present : 
The Eev. Abkaham Bronson, Rector of Bethel and Bethes- 
da Churches, Arlington, and Zion Church, Manchester. 
The Eev, Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, 

Belloius Falls. 
The Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelhurn. 
The Rev. Joseph S. Covell, Deacon, Minister of Union 

Church, St. Albans. 
The Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rector of St. Stephen's 

Church, Middlehury. 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials and 
took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL : 
Thos. p. Russell^ Oliver Gtleason. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY : 
Abijah Williams. 



258 JO UMXAL-l 825. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDPLEBURY: 

George Cleveland. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN: 

Joshua Isham, Truman Palmer. 

Asa Lyon, 2d. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson, Samuel A. Wilkins. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 

Nathan Lobdell, John Hendrick, 

Abijah Hawley, Ezra Sturges. ^ 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 
Daniel Smith, Luke Dewing. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE : 

Amherst VVilloughby, 

« 

CHURCH, ENOSBURGH: 



William Barber. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY ; 
Roswell Catlin, Rufus Smith. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President, and 
the Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That Clergy- 
men of the Protestant Episcopal Church and Candidates 
for Holy Orders in the same, attending upon this Conven- 
tion, who are not members thereof, be admitted to honorary 
seats therein. 

The Rev. John J. Robertson, Professor of Languages in 
the University of Vermont, and Mr. John Bristed, a Can- 
didate for Holy Orders in this Diocese, appeared and took 
.their seats. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a 
Committee, consisting of three persons, be appointed, to 
confer with the Trustees, of the Church lands in this State, 



JOUBJfAL-1825. , 259 

or such of them as may be present, and make such report, 
to this Convention, as they shall deem expedient. 

Whereupon the following gentlemen were appointed a 
Committee : William Barber, Amherst Willoughby and 
Samuel A. Wilkins. 

On motion by Mr. S. A. Wilkins, Resolved, That two 
Clergymen be added to the Committee last appointed. 
Upon which resolution, the Rev. Carlton Chase and Rev. 
Benj. B. Smith were appointed members of said Committee. 

Adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Morning prayer was read by Rev. Joel Clap and a Ser- 
mon delivered by the Rev. Mr. Bronson, by whom the Holy 
Communion was administered, after which the Convention 
adjourned until half past 3 o'clock this evening. 

Wednesday, half past 3 o'clock, p.m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

On motion by the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That in the 
case of parishes, destitute of officiating Clergymen, the 
Wardens be requested to report, annually to this Conven- 
tion, the number of Baptisms, Marriages and Funerals, 
which may have taken place in the same ; also the number 
of Communicants, and to state any other matters, which 
may tend to throw light on the state and prospects of the 
same. 

The following Parochial Reports were then presented and 
read : 

BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 2, children 5) — 7 ; Marriages, 5 ; Funerals, 7 ; 
Communicants, 85. 

In this Parish, besides a regular Lecture on Sunday evening, 
the Rector has, for the winter past, statedly employed four eve- 
nings in each week in explaining the Scriptures to the youth, and 
Buch as chose to attend, and has become so convinced of the 



260 , JOUBJfAL-1825. 

usefulness of the exercise, that he intends resuming it again, when 
the evenings shall be of sufficient length, 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults) 2,; Marriages 1 ; Funerals 3; Communicants, 35. 

In this Parish are a few Sunday Scholars, and during the past 
winter, evening Lectures have been held, about once a week, for 
explaining the Scriptures. In order to induce a more full attend- 
• ance at these Lectures, as well as to diffuse useful information, 
a large stock of religious tracts was procured, which were distrib- 
uted among the youth, to be returned at the next appointment 
and distributed again. Some measures of this kind, it is appre- 
hended, might be useful in each of our Churches. 

ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH, SANDGATE. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, VISITING MINISTER. 

Communicants, 3L 

In this town there is a large field for usefulness, as a considera- 
ble portion of the people are friendly to the Church, and there 
is no resident preacher of any kind. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR. 

Since the last report, two years ago, there have been baptized, 
(adults 2, children 14) — 16 ; Marriages, 2 ; Deaths, 4 ; Commu- 
nicants, 30. Whole number of families within the parish limits, 40. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

S. BRENTON SIIAW, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 2, children 24) — 26 ; Marriages, 4 ; Burials 
(adults 8, children 7 ) — 15 ; Births, 19 ; Communicants, (added 
7, died 2, removed 2) — 49 ; Families that attend Church, about 
90 ; Sunday Scholars (in East Parish 50, West Parish 25) — 75. 



JOUBJ^AL-1825. 261 

The condition of the Church in this town, has experienced no 
essential change since the last report, if we may except a more 
general attendance of the people upon the Sabbath. Planted m 
the midst of the most inveterate opposition, she has to contend 
with numerous and powerful obstacles, but, amidst all her diffi- 
culties, has gradually increased in numbers and importance. And, 
while very perceptible additions have been yearly made to those 
who worship at her altar, we trust that she has also "grown in grace 
and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ." 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

B. B. SMITH, RECTOR. 

The resources and prospects of this Parish, have been blighted, 
in an uncommon degree, by the removal of several valuable and 
excellent families to a distance, and by the death of the^ late 
Daniel Henshaw, Esq., one of its confirmed and zealous friends 
and supporters. The depression of these deplored and afflictive 
visitations, is alleviated, not by the positive accession of numbers 
and resources, but merely, though to a very cheering extent, by 
the visible increase of the congregation, and the exhibition of 
candour and kind feeling towards the Church. Could we only 
have the happiness of possessing a large and commodious edifice 
for public worship, it can scarcely be questioned that the Parish 
would greatly increase. And the erection of such an house, is an 
object nearly as interesting to the Church generally, as to the 
Parish in particular. The visible increase of parochial calls and 
duties, will be manifest by comparing with former reports, the fol- 
lowing details of the annual reports, from the Parish Register. 

Baptisms, 9,— of which one was an adult ; Funerals, 8 ; Mar- 
riages, 4 ; Communicants ( 3 added, removed and deceased 6)— 
' 35 ; Families, 30 ; Sunday Scholars, 35. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Nothing of peculiar interest, has transpired, during the past 
year, in relation to this Parish. The number of Communicants 
has gradually increased, and although we have much reason to 



262 JO UBJfAL-1 825. 

take up the lamentation of the prophet, " who hath believed our 
report," still in humble dependence upon the blessing of God,> 
upon the appointed means of grace, we look forward in earnest 
expectation for the increasing prosperity of this portion of His 
Church. 

Baptisms (adults 9, infants 1) — 10; Marriages, 4; Funerals, 4; 
Communicants, 83. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 
Baptisms, 4 ; Marriages,!; Communicants, 31. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

Baptisms (adults 1, infants 2) — 3 ; Marriages, 3 ; Communi- 
cants, 32. 

CHURCH IN ENOSBURGH. 

Communicants, 10. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms (adults 1, infants 9 ) — 10 ; Communicants, 68. 

In each of these Parishes, excepting Enosburgh, the under- 
signed has officiated, during the past year, one Sunday in each 
two months. That under such circumstances, they should have 
experienced any material increase could not have been reasonably 
expected; still we have reason to bless God, that amid all the 
discouragement, resulting from a protracted painful deprivation of 
the regular ministrations of the Word and Sacraments of the Gos- 
pel, He has been graciously pleased to preserve them from 
declension. 

With undiminished anxiety they are looking, as we trust, both 
to the Ecclesiastical Authority in this Diocese, and to the Great 
Head of the Church, for a provision for their spiritual hunger and 
thirst for the ordinances and the graces of the Gospel. 

A very cheering evidence of increasing zeal in the service of 
God is exhibited in the recent organization of a Female Auxiliary 
Missionary Society in the Parish of Christ Church, Bethel, which 
has already contributed liberally to the funds of the Parent Society. 



JOVRKAL-1825. 263 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

JOSEPH S. COVELL, MINISTER. 

Baptisma (1 infant and one n.lult), 2 ; Funerals, 2 ; Communi- 
cants (added 2), 17 ; Families, 12. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

JOSEPH S. COVELL, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (infants), 2 ; Funerals, 2 ; Communicants (removed 4), 
42 ; Families, 27. 

CHRIST CHURCH, SWANTON. 

JOSEPH S. COVELL, MINISTER. 

Communicants, 5 ; Families, 8. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 
Communicants, 69 ; Deaths, 2. 

Mr. William Barber, in behalf of the Committee, which 
was appointed this morning, to confer with " the Trustees 
of the Church lands in this State," submitted the following 
resolution, which was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Prudential Committee annually ap- 
pointed by this Convention, be directed, and they are hereby 
directed, to inquire into and report, at the next succeeding 
annual Convention, the state of the pecuniary affairs of the 
Church in this State. And that said Committee be and 
are hereby directed, to confer with the general agents of the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, 
in relation to the funds or monies, for the benefit of the 
Church, arising from the rents of land in this State belong- 
ing to said Society, and that the said Agents be and are 
hereby requested to permit said Committee to have, at all 
reasonable times, access to their Secretary's and Treasurer's 
books, to obtain such information as may be thought useful 



264 JO URJfAL-1 825. 

to theni in making a report of the general State of the affairs 
of said Church. 

The Rev. Mr. Smith in behalf of the Committee appointed 
by the last Convention, to report to this Convention, " the 
expediency of establishing a Contingent Fund to be at the 
disposal of this Convention, and the best mode of raising 
and proportioning said Fund, presented the following report : 

The Committee beg leave to report, that they have care- 
fully considered the importance and expediency of providing 
a contingent fund, for defraying the expense of delegates to 
the different Conventions, and also the best way of appor- 
tioning and raising the said fund. The narrowness of our 
pecuniary means, and the number of Conventions, attendance 
upon which is to be provided for, suggested at the outset, a 
very formidable difficulty. They presumed however, that 
this Convention would not, at present, attempt to provide 
for the expenses, either of the State, or Diocesan Convention, 
but will feel reluctantly constrained to leave the former to bo 
borne, as heretofore, by the respective delegates in atten- 
dance, and the latter, by the parishes whose Clergy or Lay 
Delegates may consider it expedient or necessary to attend. 
Your Committee in their report, have respect therefore 
simply to a provision for defraying the expenses of delegates 
to the General. Convention. 

As to the propriety and importance of such an arrangement 
it is scarcely credible that difference of opinion can exist. 
The vast importance of the acts of the General Convention — 
the operation which they have upon the remotest States in the 
Union, and the differences of local feeling and circumstances, 
render it perfectly indispensable that every portion of the 
Church should be duly represented. Yet of the delegation from 
this State, it is well known that an exceeding small propor- 
tion has hitherto had, or is likely hereafter to have, the 
means of bearing for themselves the expenses of attendance. 
Upon the Clergy it is a tax, exceedingly disproportioned to 



JO VRKAL-1 825. 265 

their salaries, and upon the Laity, a contribution justly 
considered too oppressive. If it is any way important, 
therefore, that this portion of the Church should be consti- 
tutionally represented, it becomes necessary, and is indeed 
the dictate of common justice, to provide for defraying the 
expenses of the delegates. Other States have acted under 
the influence of these sentiments of justice and propriety, 
and have generously provided in such wise for the attendance 
of their delegates, that it is never deficient on pecuniary 
accounts. 

The expediency of adopting immediate measures for ef- 
fecting this reasonable and important object, has appeared 
to your Committee, a far more difficult point to decide. 
The general interests of the Church, and all our external 
relations, point out its high expediency. But reasons with- 
in ourselves are by no means as convincing. As yet we 
are scarcely able to provide for the unavoidable expenses 
of our local transactions. Whilst, therefore, the general 
councils of the Church are as well attended, and their de- 
liberations as wisely conducted, as at present, why should 
we be anxious to incur expense for the sake of bearing an 
unnecessary and responsible part in them.^ When the at- 
tendance of our delegation becomes indispensable, it may be 
said, it will be time enough to levy contributions upon our 
infant Parishes, to defray their expenses. 

Yet it has appeared to your Committee so important 
that our representation should be somewhat proportionate, 
and so very desirable to organize all our internal arrange- 
ments against the occurrence of possible and great exigences, 
that they beg leave to report favourably upon the expedi- 
ency of commencing immediately a contingent Fund. 

The ways and means of apportioning and raising the 
fund, present, after all, the most formidable difficulties. 
Shall it be raised by equal assessments upon the Parishes ? 
This will bear with undue severity upon the smaller and 
poorer Parishes. Shall we endeavor to apportion it accor- 



266 JOUBJfAL-1825. 

ding to numbers or pecuniary ability? Who shall become 
assessors, and will not divisions and dissatisfactions be 
promoted? But would there not then be reason to fear a 
deficiency? Shall the assessment be enforced by penalties ? 
What have we that we can inflict, which will not do greater 
injury to the Church than the fund will benefit it? All 
these difficulties, and many more, have occurred to your 
Committee. No course can avoid them all. In the reso- 
lutions which they have drawn up and with which this re- 
port will be closed, they have made what has appeared to 
them the most cautious and judicious selection of means, 
and after being weighed and discussed by the Convention, it 
will be competent in that body to determine whether these, 
or others in their stead, shall be employed. Some, we trust, 
it will not fail to consider indispensable. 

The above report having b'jen accepted, and the resolu- 
tions with which it was concluded having undergone several 
amendments, they were adopted as follows : 

Resolved, That immediate measures be set on foot for 
raising a Contingent Fund, primarily for the purpose of de- 
fraying the expenses of Delegates to General Convention. 

Resolved, That it be considered the duty of the Clergy, 
or Wardens of the respective Parishes, on some Sunday be- 
tween Easter and the second Sunday in June annually, to 
take up a publick contribution to constitute said fund. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of CoiiVention be the 
Treasurer of this Fund, which shall be controuled by vote 
of Convention and paid over by order of its President. 

Resolved, That the surplus monies in the hands of the 
Treasurer of this Fund, may be disposed of by vote of Con- 
vention for other necessary or benevolent purposes, than for 
that above primarily designated. 

The following gentlemen were elected as Standing Com- 
mittee for the year ensuing : 



jOURJfAL-1825. 267 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Carlton Chase Rev. Benj. 
B Smith, Rev. Joel Clap, andRev. Samuel B. Shaw. 

The Rev Mr. Bronson, one of the Agents for the Society s 
Lands, made the following statement, which was ordered to 
be entered upon the Journals of this Convention : 

The Agents are, as yet, unable to report such a full and 
minute account of the business at their disposal, as was 
called for by the resolution of the last Convention. Eight 
suits are now in Court for the recovery of lands, which were 
expected to be tried at the last term ; but in consequence 
of some unexpected difficulties, they are all continued. A 
considerable portion of the lands, probably more than one 
third have been leased and are now bringing rents, to the 
amount of something more than one thousand dollars a yean 
The Attornies' charge, for carrying the first cause through 
the Supreme Court, has been paid, and a part ot the ex- 
penses of the present suits. The Treasurer of the Ag nts 
has been directed to pay over to the different Parishes, 
which are supplied with Clergymen, the rents arising m 
their respective towns, for the time being ; ^^d ^t is hoped, 
that each Clergyman may receive at least fifty dollars after 
the next meeting of the Agents, in May next. At that 
meetino- the Agents presume they shall be able to give the 
PrudenUal Committee a full account of their agency. 

On motion, Resolved, That the next annual meeting of 
the Convention be held at Middlebury. 

The Rev S Brenton Shaw was appointed to preach be- 
fore the next Convention, and the Rev. Carlton Chase was 
appointed his Substitute. 

The following gentlemen were then elected the Pruden- 
tial Committee : Rev. Benj. B. Smith, Hon. Dudley Chase 
and Hon. Horatio Seymour. 

The following Delegates to the General Convention were 
appointed : Kev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Benj. B^ Smith, 
Rev Joel Clap and Rev. S. Brenton Shaw - Clerical ; 



268 JOLRJfAL-1825. 

Daniel Ghipman, Dudley Chase, Jonathan H. Hubbard and 
Dana Hyde — Laymen. 

The Convention adjourned until 6 o'clock to-morrow 
morning. 

Thursday, June 23d, 6 o'clock a. m. 
The Convention met according to adjournment. 
On motion, Voted that the Secretary be directed to pub- 
lish the Journal of the proceedings of this Convention, and 
to defray the expense of the same from the Funds of the 
Convention. 
Adjourned, without day. 
A true Record. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



The following paragraphs from the Address of Bishop Griswold 
to the Convention of the Eastern Diocese, delivered in St. PauJ's 
Church, Boston, September 28th, 1825, are here appropriate. 

"Brethren Beloved and Christian Friends: 

Through the Lord's patient goodness, we are advanced another 
year in the important work committed to our hands. The view of 
our labours, and the present state of the Diocese, which it is my 
duty to lay before you, may be comprised in few words ; for my 
principal journey in the visitation of our Churches has, for several 
reasons been postponed till after the meeting of this Convention. A 
considerable number of them, however, have been already visited, 
and a very few, seventy-two only, have been confirmed. Several 
of our Candidates have been dismissed to other parts of our 
country. Those admitted during the year are, Robert B. Drane, 
Henry H. Oliver, Joseph H. Coit, Alexander H. Codwise, More 
Bingham, John Bristed, Jared Rice, Frederrck C. R. Green, 
Gustavus A. Dewitt, and Henry Goodwin." 

" Three only, George Richardson, Thomas S. W. Mott, and 
Daniel L. B. Goodwin, have been admitted to the Order of Dea- 
cons; and the Rev. Joseph Muencher, Benjamin C. Cutler and 



JOVBKAL-1825. 269 

Theodore Edson, Deacons, have been ordained Priests. The Rev. 
Lot Jones, the Rev. Elijah Brainard, the Rev. Jasper Adams and 
the Rev. John J. Robertson have taken letters dismissory from 
this Diocese. " 

" It has pleased the Father of Mercies to continue His blessing 
to this portion of His people ; prosperity has generally attended 
our labours ; while some few occurrences of an unpleasant nature 
remind us of our sins and dependence." 

" There is a propriety in my observing, generally, that few 
things can be more injurious to the general interests of religion, 
or more hurtful to our Church in this Diocese particularly, than 
exciting sectional prejudices, and undermining that confidence 
which we ought to have in all our Christian brethren. Hitherto, 
considering that we are thinly scattered over many States, the 
union which a merciful God has given us, has been very remark- 
able, and demands our daily gratitude and praise. Let us not 
inconsiderately dash such a cup of blessing from our hands. Let 
us be sure that others have sinned against God, and that we are 
called to be their accusers, before we presume to cast the stone. 
Nothing is easier, if we will indulge a strong propensity of corrupt 
nature, from a difference of opinion in the most trivial things, 
than to blow up the devouring flame of a sectarian spirit. Al- 
ready are heard amongst Episcopalians, the discordant sounds of 
party distinctions, which every friend of our Church should ex- 
ercise his utmost prudence to oppose. Jealousy and crimination 
are the fuel which most fatally feed the flame of discord, and are 
the opposite of that charity which 'thinketh no evil.' So blessed 
are the fruits of 'a meek and quiet spirit,' we scarce need be told 
by the pen of inspiration, that it 'is in the sight of God of great 
price.' When we consider further, how powerful the citadel of 
the Christian faith is assailed, needless feuds among its defenders 
would seem as that infatuation which is the harbinger of ruin." 

" In Vermont, the Church has still powerful obstacles to con- 
tend with ; but the prospect continues to brighten, and true 
religion, we trust, to increase. Our Clergy are becoming more 
attentive to the wants of that part of the Lord's Vineyard. But 
nine years ago, there was not a Church edifice in that State, 
properly ours. Since, there have been seven already consecrated ; 



270 - J0UR:N'AL-1825. 

and two raore — in Sheldon and St. Albans — it is expected, the 
Lord permitting, will, within a few days lie added to their number. 
The Rev. Mr. Oovell has officiated at St. Albans during the 
most of the year last past. The Rev. Mr. Olney intends soon to 
leave the Church in Gardner in the State of Maine. With plea- 
sure I add, that in several parts of the Diocese are missionary 
societies, which merit much praise." 

" If we desire the blessing of God ; if we would see our Churches 
increase in numbers and piety, it is of immense importance that 
the forms of Religion be suitably regarded in our families. Our 
children should not only be early dedicated to the Lord in baptism, 
but brought up in His nurture and admonition. Family Prayer, 
which we fear is much neglected, should be generally performed. 
They who have been baptized, should never forget that the oath 
of God is upon them, and what mercies were sealed to their bene- 
fit ' by the washing of regeneration.' And they should desire above 
all things, ' the renewing of the Holy Ghost.' By a serious con- 
sideration of the nature of Baptism, through God's blessing, they 
may be prepared for Confirmation, which should never be incon- 
siderately received, nor too long delayed. Much injury has been 
done to religion, and much discredit brought upon our Church, by 
admitting, and even urging to Confirmation, those who have no 
true repentance or faith, nor any serious regard for religion. The 
ordinance itself which, when rightly used, is of inestimable benefit, 
has, in consequence of this laxity, ' become a hissing and a bye- 
word.' No one need be told that Confirmation is a voluntary 
ratification of the baptismal covenant, and is considered by the 
Church as preparatory to the Lord's Supper. Of course, what is 
necessary to qualify adults for Baptism and the Eucharist, is also 
necessary for receiving Confirmation." 

"The best we can do towards reforming the world, is to reform 
ourselves ; to endeavour more and more to be and do whatever God 
requires of those who would be saved in Christ forever. If we 
have the spirit of Christ; if we indeed possess and feel that love 
for all men, which He so positively requires of His disciples, we 
shall naturally manifest it by doing good, as we may have oppor- 
tunity, to all men, and e.specially to them who are of the House- 
hold of Faith." Gospel Advocate, vol. v, pp. 346 — 355. 



JOURJfAL-1825. 271 

The following communication, report and act close np, on the 
part of the State, the affair of New-Haven and William Wheeler. 
"In Council Chamber, Montpelier, Nov. 7, 1825. 
Sir: — I have the honour to transmit to the General Assembly 
a re})ort from the Agent appointed under a resolution of the last 
session, to settle the claims of the Hon. Daniel Webster, and of 
the estate of the late David Edmond, Esq. against this State. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

TuE Hon. D. A. A. Buck, C. P. VAN NESS. 

Speaker of the General Assembly." 

The report thus transmitted was as follows : 
" To His Excellency the Governor : — 

Sir : — In pursuance of my appointment as 
Agent to settle with the administrators, with the late Agent and 
with the counsel for this State in the suit in favour of ' The Society 
for propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, against the town of 
New-Haven and William Wheeler, I have settled with the adminis- 
trators of David Edmond, Esq. deceased, and found a balance of 
Thirty Dollars due to them. 

The account for the services and expenses of Mr. Edmond ac- 
companies this communication. 

By a reference to the correspondence of the Hon. Daniel Web- 
ster, published in the Journal of the last session of the General 
Assembly, it appears that there is due to him, as counsel in said 
suit, the sum of three hundred dollars. 

In 1819, there was appropriated to defray the expenses of the 
above named suit, $ 000.00 

In 1820, there was a further appropriation of . , . 300.00 

Amounting to . . $ 900.00 

The account of Mr. Edmond, including $ 400 paid to 

Mr. Webster, amounts to $ 680.00 

There remains due to Mr. Webster, SnO.OO 

Amounting to . . . 980.00 
From which deduct appropriation, 900.00 

Leaves abalance of .... $80.00 
due from the State, above the amount appropriated. 
I am, with respect, 

Your Excellency's obedient servant, 
Montpelier, Nov. V, 18:^5. NORMAN WILLIAMS. 



272 JOUBJ^J.L-1826. 

The foregoing report having been read was referred to the Com- 
mittee of ways and means. This Committee reported the following 
Bill Nov. 15th, which became a law Nov. 17. 1825. 

" It is herely enacted hy the General Assembly of the State of 
Vermont, That the sum of eighty dollars is hereby appropriated for 
the purpose of discharging the balance of the accounts of the counsel 
for the State, in the suit in favour of the Society for Propagating the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts against the town of New-Haven and William 
Wheeler, which sum, together with the balance of former appro- 
priations, remaining in the treasury, the Treasurer of this State is 
directed to pay to the Agent appointed to settle with the counsel 
in said suit." Journal 1825, pp. 146, 202, 213. 

Acts of the Legislature 1825, pp. 34, 35. 



1826. 

MiDDLEBURY, JuHG 28, 1826. 

This being the day designated by the Constitution of the 
Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont, 
for the annual meeting of said Convention, the Eight Kev. 
Alexander V. Grriswold, Bishop of the Eastern Diocese, a 
number of the Clergy, and Lay Delegates from several Par- 
shes in the State, assembled at Middlebury, at 9 o'clock, a. 

Present : 
Eight Rev. Alexander V. Griswold, D. D., President ex 

officio. 
Rev. Moore Bingham, Deacon, Minister of Grace Church, 

Sheldon, and Trinity Church, Fairfield. 
Rev. John Bristed, Deacon, residing in Middlebury. 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Bethel and Bethesda 

Churches, Arlington, and Zion Church, Manchester. 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows 

Falls. 



JOURJfAL-1826. 273 

Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Trinity Churchj Shelhurn. 

Rev. Louis M'Donald, Deacon, Minister of the Churches 
in Rutland. 

Rev. Sylvester Nash, Minister of Union Church, St. Al- 
bans. 

Rev. S. Brenton Shavt, Rector of Christ Church, Guilford. 

Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, 
Middlehury. 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials, and 
took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE: 

David Coburn. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 

Luke Dewing. 

CHRLST CHURCH, SWANTON : 

'•'Samuel Hoffman. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS; 

Orange Ferris. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN: 

Joshua Isham, George Clayes, 

Truman Palmer. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY : 

Daniel Chipman, George Cleaveland, 

Robert B. Bates. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Dudley Chase, Thomas P. Russell, 

Oliver Gleason. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK : 
*RoYAL Blake. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, RUTLAND : 

* Jonathan C. Thrall, 



* These Paiishes were received into connection with the Convention at 
this time. 



274 JOUR^AL-1826. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET 
Daniel Fitch. 



CHURCH, ENOSBURGH: 

John Frazer. 

l^Qv. Joel Clap was chosen Secretary. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That Clergy- 
men of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and candidates 
for Holy Orders in the same, attending on this Conven- 
tion, who are not members thereof, be admitted to honorary 
seats therein ; 

Whereupon, Rev George Leonard, Rev. Palmer Dyer and 
Mr. Jones, a candidate for Holy Orders, appeared and took 
their seats. 

On motion by Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a Committee of 
three be appointed, whose duty it shall be to nominate the 
Standing and Prudential Committees and a Delegation to 
the General Convention, and report to the Convention this 
evening. 

Adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Morning prayer was conducted by Rev. Joel Clap, and a 
Sermon preached by Rev. S. Brenton Shaw ; after which, 
the Holy Communion was administered by Right Rev. 
Bishop Griswold. 

The Convention resumed business according to adjourn- 
ment. 

Rev. Carlton Chase, in behalf of Rev. Palmer Dyer, pre- 
sented to the Convention three printed Journals of the Pro- 
ceedings of the Convention of the Diocese of New- York. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That the thanks 
of this Convention be and they hereby are returned to Rev. 
Palmer Dyer for the aforesaid donation. 

Adjourned until 3 o'clock, this evening. 

Wednesday, June 28th, 3 o'clock, p. m. 
The Convention met according to adjournment. 



JOVnKAL-182G. 275 

The following Parochial Keports were then presented and 

1*63,(1 * 

BETHEL AND BETHESDA CHURCHES, ARLINGTON. 

J. H. COIT, MINISTER. 

Communicants, 84, including thirteen additional members; 
Baptisms, 13, of which five were adults; P^unerals, 7. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 1 ; Funerals, 3 ; Communicants, 39. 

The prospects of this Parish are more encouraging than they 
have been for several years past. The Rector has lately removed 
his residence into it, and is now bestowing upon it his whole 
services. There is an increasing attendance upon public worship, 
and favourable indications as to the progress of real piety. There 
has been an addition of five to the list of Communicants ; and 
some others are expected to join soon. The Bible Class and Sun- 
day School are small, but are uniformly attended to in the 
intermission on Sundays. 

ST. MATTHEW'S CHURCH, SANDGATE. 

A. BRONSON, VISITING MINISTER. 

Communicants, about 30. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET. 

PALMER DYER, MINISTER. 

Communicants (added 12), 27. 

The members of this Society are firm and devoted Churchmen. 
The cause of Christ, and the concerns of our Apostolic Churchy 
are prosperous. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, CENTREVILLE, RUTLAND. 

LOUIS m'dONALD, MINISTER. 

Baptisms — infants 6, adults 4 ; Communicants, 12. 



276 JOURJ^AL-1826. 

The prospects of this Parish are somewhat disheartening, owing 
to its recent formation, and the comparatively small number of 
those who are firmly attached to its interests, and anxious for its 
prosperity. The Communion has been twice administered during 
the past year, and services kept up between this and the East 
Parish alternately since February last. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

S. BRENTON SIIAW, RECTOR. 

With the exception of sundry changes occasioned by deaths 
removals, and accessions, the two congregations which compose 
this Parish have experienced no sensible alteration since the last 
meeting of the Convention. It is worthy of note, however, that 
although one hundred and twenty-five persons, belonging to the 
Parish, have either removed or deceased within four years past, no 
perceptible diminution has taken place in our worshipping assem- 
blies ; and the inference is obvious, that the prejudices which 
threatened the extinction of this infant Church, are giving way, 
and that there exists among the people a growing attachment to 
our "form of sound words," and to the "faith once delivered to 
the saints." The Records present the following memoranda for 
the past year. 

Baptisms, ( adult 1 children 4 ) — 5 ; Funerals 9 ; Mar- 
riages 15 ; Births 16 ; Communicants (added 7, removed and 
deceased 4) 52. Families attending Church, between 80 and 90 ; 
Sunday Scholars in both Schools about 70. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

C. CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adult 1) — 10 ; Marriage, 1 ; Death, 1 ; Communicants, 
35 ; Sunday Scholars, 35. 

The Rector considers the condition of this Parish highly pros- 
perous. Important additions have been made to the Communion ; 
the Church has been much improved, and the choir furnished with 
an Organ. 



JOURXAL-1826. 277 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

There have been, since the last report was made, two yeais ago, 
7 Baptisms, 4 Marriages, and 5 Burials. Communicants, 35. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

B. B. SMITH, RECTOR. 

Immediately after the last Convention, efforts were made to as- 
certain the disposition and means of the people in reference to 
erecting a substantial church edifice. By the munificence of one 
individual, and the anticipated benevolence of distant friends, it 
was thought that a sum might be raised, in addition to the very 
limited means of the Parishioners themselves, sufficient for this 
purpose. An appeal to the liberality of Episcopalians, in several 
of our principal towns and cities, has accordingly been made, and 
about six hundred dollars have already been raised. The sum is 
not yet equal to our necessities. For the stone edifice, which is 
now in a state of considerable progress, will be far beyond the 
means of the few Episcopal families in the village, though no ways 
larger or more expensively finished than the peculiar circumstances 
of the place necessarily require. It is hoped that the considera- 
tions urged in our distant application, will still procure for us a 
sum sufficient for the end proposed. Before the meeting of an- 
other Convention I trust the building will be so far completed as 
to allow its being used for the purposes of })ublick worship. 

During a small part of the year past, some of the congregation 
committed to my charge have manifested a measure of that se- 
rious interest in divine things, which I pray may ever abound 
amongst them ; and the preaching of the word, for a while, was 
received with much solicitude. Seriousness, then first commenced, 
has since, in some few cases ripened, I trust, into real piety. 

To the Communion, 14 have been added, which, counterbalanced 
by some removals and other fluctuations, will leave the whole 
number of Communicants about 46. Of 16 Baptisms, 4 were of 
adults. There have been but 6 Funerals, and only 1 Marria e. 
The number of Families accountins: themselves settled Parish- 



278 . JOTJRKAL-1826. 

oners, is not known to have increased. And with regret I con- 
clude by representing the Sunday School as in rather a declining 
condition, 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

JOHN RICHARDSON, WARDEN. 

Baptisms (adults 4, children 3,) — 7 ; Funerals, 2 ; Commu- 
nicants, 18. 

* 

CHRIST CHURCH, SWANTON. 

SAMUEL HOFFMAN, WARDEN. 

Communicants, 7. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

MOOKE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Funeral,!; Communicants, 42 ; Families, 27. 

This Church cannot be considered in a very increasing state : 
It has however, less to fear from the zeal of its opposers, than 
from the coldness and indifference of its professed friends. A 
Sunday School has been commenced with about twenty-five Schol- 
ars, and promises the desired success of much usefulness to the 
children. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants 3; Funeral,!; Removal, I; Com- 
municants, 67. 

The members of this Church are very strongly and laudably at- 
tached to its services and all its peculiarities; but the remem- 
brance of former difficulties evidently continues to prevent its 
growth in numbers and in grace. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms — infants 6 ; Marriage, ! ; Communicants, 35. 



JO URNAL-1 824. 279 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants 2; Marriages, 2 ; Communicants, 35. 



CHURCH, ENOSBURGH. 



Baptisms — infant 1 ; Communicants, 12. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, MISSIONARY. 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants 9; Communicants, SO. 

The Female Missionary Society in this Parish continues to be 
a very efficient auxiliary to the Parent Society, and the weekly 
meeting of many of the females of this Church for devotional 
exercises, has been blessed as the means of increasing the piety 
and devout affection of those who attend the same. A Mite 
Society and Sunday School have been recently established under 
very favourable auspices. And the prospects of this Parish are 
upon the whole much more encouraging than even our most san- 
guine expectations had anticipated. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Divine service was performed in this Parish, for the first time, 
on Sunday, the 20th of November last. Since which time, our 
meetings for publick worship have been uniformly well and 
attentively attended. 'Arrangements are now making for the 
erection of a neat Church edifice ; and there are favorable indica- 
tions, that the Lord is rendering the humble administration of the 
Gospel effectual in leading souls to the knowledge of the Saviour. 

Baptisms — adults 5, infants 9 ; Communicants, 14. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants 4; Marriages, 2; Funerals, 4; 
Communicants, 83. 



280 JOVRKAL-1826. 

The following Committees and Delegates, nominated by 
the Committee appointed for that purpose, were appointed " 

Standing Committee, — Rev. Messrs. Abraham Bronson, 
Carlton Chase, Joel Clap and S. Brenton Shaw. 

Pkudential Committee, — Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, 
Hon. Dudley Chase, and Hon. Horatio Seymour. 

Delegates to the General Convention, — Clergy, 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rev. 
Carlton Chase, Rev. Joel Clap. Laymen, Dudley Chase, 
Alexander Fleming, George Cleaveland, Royal Blake. 

Rev. Mr. Chase proposed the following amendment to the 
Constitution': 

In article 2d, instead of the words, " The said Conven- 
tion shall meet annually on the fourth Wednesday in June," 
insert, " The said Convention shall meet annually on the 
last Wednesday in May." 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund made the follow- 
ing Report, which was accepted : 

The Treasurer of the Continqent Fund, 

In account with the Convention : Dr. 

To contributions this day received from the following Parishes: 

Zion Church, Manchester, .... $2.06 
Iramanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . . 9.33 

Christ Church, Bethel, 8.00 

St. Stephen's Church, Middlebury, . . 5.10 

Trinity Church, Shelburn, 5.56 

Trinity Church, Fairfield, .... 3.62 
Grace Church, Sheldon, 8.40 

To oblation taken at the Communion this day, .... 8.76 

"$45^ 

Per Contra : Cr. 

By balance due for printing Journals of the last Convention % 4.00 
" Cash on hand, . . • 41.83 

$45.83 
June 28, 1826. JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 



JOVRKAL-18^6. 281 

Rev. Mr. Smith, in behalf of the Prudential Committee, 
presented the following Report, which was accepted : 

The Prudential Committee in obedience to the instructions of 
the Convention, and by permission of the Agents of the Society 
for Propagating the Gospel, have inspected the hooks and papers 
in the possession both of their Secretary and Treasurer, and as 
the result of their examination, beg leave to report,— 

That the records in the Secretary's office furnish a clear and 
connected history of the proceedings in recovery of the lands, and 
a plain view of the tenure and circumstances under which they 
are holden, and the nses to which they are consecrated. But from 
these papers thev could make no selections which would contain 
any valuable information additional to what has already, on a 
previous occasion, been submitted to the Convention. 

The Treasurer's books and accounts are kept in a style of neat- 
ness and accuracy, and contain much valuable information, of 
which a condensed view will herewith be submitted. Returns 
have not yet been received from all the towns where lands were 
aianted— in some of which the recovery is retarded by suits not 
yet decided; and in many of which, no titles or no lands are to he 
found. As far as returns have been made, they furnish the fol- 
lowing results : 

Of the towns in which lots have been leased, there are in the 

County of &ir^ 11 

Windham, five towns, annual rent, $ lb4.ii 

Orange, three towns, " 101.71 

Washington, five towns, " 90-00 

Franklin, seven towns, " 185.08 

Chittenden, eleven towns, " 437.33 

Addison, twelve towns, " 428.76 

Rutland, six towns. " ^ J^8J6 

Total, $1,575.75 

From these towns considerable sums have been received, and 
still larger, reckoning back to the time of recovery, are yet due, 
as will appear from the following table : 



282 JOURJ^AL-1826. 

Counties. Amount received. Rents for three years. 

Windham, $278.77 $492.33 

Orange, 259.54 305.13 

Washington, 241.50 270.00 

Franklin, 318.40 555.24 

Chittenden, 850.33 1,311.19 

Addison, 827.72 1,286.28 

Rutland, 288.79 506.28 

Total rents, $4,726.45 

Am't received, 3,0(35.05 

Balance due, $661.40 

Of the number and value of the unleased lots, no satisfactory 
estimate can be made. 

The Agents have proceeded to adjust some of the claims upon 
the lands for expenses in recovery, and besides other small matters, 
have made the following appropriations : 

To Eev. A. Bronson, $ 1,200.00 

« A. Sperry, Esq 1,134.00 

" J. Hopkinson, Esq., 900.00 

" Daniel Chipman, Esq., 337.58 

Total, $3,571.58 

All which, with some other items, will appear by the following 
summary of the Treasurer's books : 

Treasurer — Debtor. 

For the following amounts received, exclusive of expenses in- 
curred in effecting leases, surveying lands, &c. 

In the County of Windham, $278.77 

" " Orange, 259.54 

" " Washington, 241.50 

" " Franklin, 318.40 

« " Chittenden, 850.33 

" " Addison, 827.72 

« « Rutland, 288.79 

$3,065.05 



JOUBJ^AL-1826. 283 

Treasurer — Credito r. 
Amount paid to Hon. D. Chipman * $1,657.76 

Paid A. J. Spcrry, Esq. toward appropriation in his favor, 330.00 

Episcopal Society in Middlebury, 160.00 

u « Guilfjrd, 160 50 

« " Shelburn 89-'^9 

Rev. A. Bronson, l^^-^^ 

Rt. Rev. Bp. Griswokl, 100.00 

For blank books for Treasurer and county Agents— for 
blanks for returns, &c. and for travelling expenses 
to adjust accounts with county Agents, .... 83.08 
Hon. Jona. H. Hubbard, and charged him in account, 50.00 

Now in the hands of the Treasurer, 63.62 

Now in the hands of county Agents subject to the 

order of the Treasurer, ^44^ 

$ 3,065.05 
June 28, 1826. 

From the foregoing statement it will be seen that greater difficul- 
ty and delay have attended the adjustment of this business than 
were at first anticipated ; and that the total amount of net an- 
nual income falls very far below the extravagant expectations of 
the public. 

It has afforded the Prudential Committee the greatest pleasure, 
however, to observe with what accuracy all accounts are kept, and 
with what wisdom and efficiency arrangements have been made for 
future collections, and what sure vouchers are required, and safe 
checks are provided in all money transactions. It would seem to 
them scarcely possible that the arrangements adopted, and now in 
actual experiment, should not make collections alike prompt, safe 
and economical. 

Whether more efficient measures might not be adopted for 
securing the rents of lots yet unleased, remains with the wisdom 
of the Agents. If no risk attends present delay, this certainly 

* Mr Chipman's account for monies expended in suits— for a sum here- 
tofore allowed him, and for cash paid to Mr. Hopkinson, is something 
larger than the amount received by him. 



284 JOURJfAL-1826. 

appears less important, since all rents can be recovered, back to 
the time of the first favoxirable decision of the Supreme Court, 
in February, 1823. 

The Prudential Committee, in conclusion, beg leave to express 
the high opinion which they entertain of ths care and integrity 
of the Agents in the discharge of their difficult and responsible 
duties. The efficiency of their measures is materially diminished 
by the remoteness of their residence from each other, and the 
consequent difficulty of effecting regular meetings, as well as by 
the distance of the various Agents to whom the business in the 
several counties is entrusted. But the confidence which this 
Convention has reason to place in their general faithfulness, may 
safely be unlimited. 

This Committee cannot but suggest, before closing, the vast 
importance of procuring the perpetuation of the powers, under 
which the present Agents and Attornies act, or rather such a mod- 
ification of them, as may render the conveyance irrevocable, and 
place the whole business more directly under the supervision of 
the Convention. 

All which is respectfully submitted, by the Prudential Commit- 
tee, through their Chairman, 

B. B. SiMITH. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That in view of 
the Report of the Prudential Committee respecting the pro- 
ceedings of the General Agents of the Church lands in this 
State, this Convention is fully satisfied of the wisdom and 
equity of the proceedings thus reported, and would express 
its thanks to the Prudential Committee for their laborious 
attention to the subject submitted to them. 

On motion. Resolved, That the Agents of the "Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel," &c. be and they hereby are 
requested to require of Parishes applying to them for assist- 
ance from their funds, a detailed account of the number of 
Parishioners, the amount of their Grand List, and also the 
amount of salary actually raised by said Parishes for their 
Rector or Minister. 



JOVUKAL-lSm. 285 

The following preamble and resolution, presented by Hon. 
Dudley Chase, were unanimously adopted : 

It being, in the opinion of this Convention, important that 
the clergy and people of our respective parishes be furnished 
with the means of sound and useful instruction, and that 
without access to books such information cannot be obtained ; 
and, as in the infant state of our Church, the moderate sala- 
ries of our clergy will not enable them to purchase books : 
it is therefore 

Kesolved, That this Convention recommend each parish in 
the State of Vermont to establish a Parochial Library for the 
use of the existing Clergyman and members thereof; and 
that the Minister or Wardens of each Parish be requested 
to return an annual report to this Convention of the condition 
of its Parochial Library. 

On motion, Voted, That the next meeting of this Conven- 
tion be held in Christ Church, Bethel. 

Rev. Sylvester Nash was appointed to preach before the 
next Convention, and Rev. Carlton Chase his substitute. 

The following resolution of the last Convention of the 
Eastern Diocese was submitted to the Convention : 

"Resolved, That the Secretary be requested to inform the 
Secretaries of the several State Conventions composing this 
Diocese, that the business of devising means for the more 
effectual support of the Episcopate is committed to the State 
Conventions, and that they are hereby requested to attend 
to that duty," which was referred to a committee of three to 
report to the next Convention ; upon which committee the 
following persons were appointed — Hon. Dudley Chase, Hon. 
Daniel Chipman, Rev. Benjamin B. Smith. 

Adjourned until 6 o'clock, to-morrow morning. 

Thursday, June 29, 1826—6 o'clock, a. m. 
Convention met pursuant to adjournment. 
Rev. Abraham Bronson was elected President. 



286 JOURKAL-18^6. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That the Treas- 
urer of the Contingent Fund be and hereby is directed to 
vest the balance of said Fund, after deducting the expense 
of printing the Journal of this Convention, in such manner 
as it may accumulate to the best advantage. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Smith, Voted, That the Secretary 
be directed to publish six hundred copies of the Journal of 
this Convention at the expense of the Contingent Fund. 

After prayer by the President, the Convention adjourned 
without day. 

A true record. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



The following passages from the Annual Address of Bishop 
Griswold to the Convention of the Eastern Diocese assembled 
at Bristol, R. I. Sept. 27, 1826, properly belong to the foregoing 
Journal. 

" My labours, in the year past, have not been less abundant than 
at former periods. Since our meeting last year in Boston, I have 
been able, through the Lord's goodness, to visit all the Churches 
in the Diocese, with the exception of three or four, which are 
not far distant, and which I should have visited, but for the diffi- 
culty of finding some one to fill my place here. But this cause 
of my failure in visiting these few — this circumstance that none 
of our Clergy were disengaged, gives us a pleasing idea of their 
diligence, and the state of our Churches." 

" And what is yet more encouraging, and demands our grateful 
acknowledgments to the Lord of the harvest, eight or ten Cler- 
gymen, or Candidates since ordained, respectable for their talents 
and pious zeal, have recently from other parts, come into the 
Diocese, where they are labouring with much success and appro- 
bation. This, we humbly trust, is an evidence that the Lord 
has not forsaken, but is still smiling upon us, and if we are faithful 
that He will continue to bless His Churches committed to our 
care. These our brethren who have kindly come to our help, we 



JOURJfAL-1826. 287 

are bound to receive, and I trust that they are received by the 
right hand of fellowship, and with the most sincere and cordial 
affection." 

" In these visitations, during the past year, I have travelled 
about three thousand miles, including one journey, which was 
extended into Lower Canada ; a journey, it is believed, not with- 
out use to the Churches in these States. A friendly intercourse 
between our Churches and those in the Canadas will evidently 
be of mutual benefit; and especially favourable to our brethren 
in Vermont. The kindness and cordiality with which I was 
received at Montreal and Quebec, especially by the Honourable 
and very worthy Bishop of those provinces, was an interesting 
proof of the politeness and hospitality of our brethren in those 
cities, and also of their Christian love and their readiness to 
co-operate in whatever shall best promote the cause which we 
all have in view. The recent appointment to the Episcopate 
there, of one so justly, and so universally respected and esteemed 
— of one so long and so very much devoted to the cause of the 
blessed Redeemer, and of the best good of mankind, causes the 
most pleasing anticipations of the future prosperity of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church in that part of America." 

" Vermont appears to be the most flourishing part of this Dio- 
cese. In my journey through it last October, I consecrated new 
Churches in Sheldon and Fairfield ; and at Middlebury admitted 
Moore Bingham and Louis M'Donald to the order of Deacons. 
The Rev. John Bristed, Joseph H. Coit, and Richard Peck, from 
the State of New-York, who have been ordained within the year 
past, are now labouring in Vermont ; and the Rev. Mr. Nash, 
from Virginia, is also added, and is a valuable addition to the 
number of their Clergy. Mr. Peck is labouring in Berkshire, 
Montgomery and Enosburgh ; Mr. Bingham in Fairfield and 
Sheldon ; and Mr. Nash in St. Albans and Swanton. And much 
cause have we of thankfulness that those Churches are at length 
supplied. Mr. Bristed, it is hoped, will officiate at Ferrisburgh — 
a new parish — and at Vergennes. The parish in Middlebury are 
now engaged in erecting a new stone edifice, which, if they succeed 
in obtaining means to finish, will be one of our best Churches. Mr. 
M'Donald has officiated in Rutland. The Rev. Mr. Bronson has 



288 JOURJfAL-1826. 

removed to Manchester. The Cliurcli in Arlington is under the 
care of the Rev. Mr Coit. 

In ray tour through Vermont in June last, accompanied by ray 
Rev. brethren Leonard and Clap, I visited for the first time a Par- 
ish newly formed in Woodstock, where I passed the fifth Sunday 
after Trinity, June '25th. The kindness and hospitality with which 
we were received and entertained, and still more the prospects of a 
good parish in that place, were highly gratifying. The people who 
have organized theraselves into an Episcopal Society, are respectable 
in point l)oth of numbers and character, and what is still more en- 
couraging, they appear to be united, prudent and zealous. In that 
beautiful village, they have selected a pleasant spot for erecting a 
Church, and had, it was said, already subscribed liberally for that 
purpose. We had the most pleasing proof of their being much in 
earnest, in the large number who assembled for worship, and the 
devout attention which they gave to the various services of the day. 

I preached three times, confirmed twelve, and, for the first time 
in that place according to our mode, the Communion was admin- 
istered. They who had been confirmed, with several others, devout- 
ly united in commemorating that adorable sacrifice which alone 
can expiate sin and give spiritual life. I have witnessed but very 
few occasions more interesting. May the Lord in His merciful 
goodness guide and bless them. In other places in that State are 
opening prospects ; and when, through the Divine blessing, they 
shall have obtained quiet possession of their lands, and the expenses 
shall be defrayed, we may hope for still greater increase."' 

"But two names have been added to the list of Candidates for 
Holy Orders — James M. Tappan and Ebenezer Boyden. Seven 
have been admitted to the Order of Deacons — Moore Bingham, 
Louis M'Donald, Joseph H. Coit, Richard Peck, John Bristed, 
Southerland Douglass, and Benjamin C. C. Parker. And the Rev. 
Silas Blaisdale, Henry VV. Ducachet, Thomas S. W. Mott, George 
Otis and George Griswold, Deacons, have been ordained Priests, 
Confirmation in several of the Churches visited, has been post- 
poned till the next year; and in others none were desirous of 
receiving that rite. In the compass of the year, I have admin- 
istered it twenty-seven times, and yet the whole number confirmed, 
amounts only to two hundred and ten." 



J0UB:N'AL-1826. 289 

"Since we last met, and indeed within a very few weeks, it has 
pleased the Head of the Church to remove from our society, and 
from his ministry here on earth, our worthy and much esteemed 
brother, the Rev. Herbert Marshall. The Lord knoweth His 
own piipose, and can overrule the most calamitous event to the 
furtherance of the Gospel. May the Lord who has removed him 
•to a better world, in His compassionate goodness, send others of 
like spirit, the like abilities, to supply his place. Our respect for 
his memory cannot U better shown than in our kind regard to 
the lovely family which he has left in sorrow." 

"The present is an age of scrutiny, investigation and eager 
attempts at improvement in every thing. This makes it neces- 
sary that Christians should be cautious, lest novelty and change 
be mistaken for improvement. In religion there is no improve- 
ment possible but that of being more and more conformed to the 
perfect standard of God's Word, which is the religion of Protest- 
ants. For such improvement there is no doubt space abundant, 
both in Churches and individuals." 

"While we follow peace with all men, exercising unbounded 
charity towards others, we are bound to be strict with ourselves, 
and to stand fast in the true faith of Christ. At the present time 
Itberality is a word which seems to be substituted for chariUj; and 
it behooves us to beware lest it should be a 'wolf in sheep's cloth- 
ino-.' If it be indeed charity we cannot too much esteem and 
foUow it. But Christian charity neither requires nor admits of 
any laxity in our faith and practice. It does not consist in word 
and tongue, hut in deed and truth. Sectarian love, praising and ex- 
tolling our own party, and those who agree with us in sentiment, 
while^'we, indirectly at least, stigmatize, or cast a shade over 
others, is the reverse of charity. Indifference respecting articles 
of belief is not charity. To suppose it unessential what Church 
we belong to and what doctrines and manner of worship we em- 
brace, is°not charity. We mast believe what God has taught, 
and we must worship Him in spirit and truth.'''' 

"It is one and a very distinguishing mark of what is called 
liberality, to denounce and war against creeds and articles of 
faith. What is said upon this subject has undoubtedly excited 
prejudices against our Church and impeded our labours. On both 



290 JOURMAL-1827. 

sides of this question, the utility of creeds, there seems to be some 
misunderstanding of its true nature. If the Scriptures teach any 
thing, they teach that faith is necessary to our salvation: we must 
believe what is taught of Jesus Christ, or we have no promise of 
future blessedness in His heavenly kingdom. And if we must 
believe, it is evidently necessary that we receive as true and essen- 
tial to our salvation some particular articles of faith. It would be 
something worse than absurd to suppose it necessary to believe in 
Christ and yet not necessary to believe anything in particular 
respecting Him. But if there be some points, or facts or doc- 
trines, whatever they are, necessary to be believed, these are 
articles of faith ; and of any one such we may say what the 
Scriptures say of faith generally, — ' He that believeth not shall be 
damned.' And though, through fear of wounding delicate ears, 
we use softer language, I see not how any one can faithfully 
preach the Gospel without setting forth some particular doctrines 
of Christ which they who would be saved must believe. Even the 
fault of the Athanasian Creed, which is so much condemned, is in 
being too particular. For supposing the articles of that creed to 
be no other or more than the Scriptures make necessary to the 
Christian Faith, what is called the damnatory part, and gives so 
much offence, is but the plain language of God's Word." Epis- 
copal Register, vol. i, pp. 186, 187, 188; vol. ii, pp. 29, 30. 



1827. 

Bethel, June 27, 1827. 

This being the day and place assigned for the annual 
meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Vermont, a number of the Clergy, and Lay Del- 
egates from several Parishes in said State, assembled in 
Christ Church, Bethel, at 9 o'clock, a. m., and were called 
to order by Rev. Abraham Bronson. 



JOURJfAL-1827. 291 

Present : 
Rev. Moore Bingham, Deacou, Minister of Grace Church, 

Sliddon, and Trinity Church, Fairfield. 

Rev. John Bristed, Rector of Church, Ferrisburgh. 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Church, IfawcAes/er. 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows 

Falls. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelburn. 
Rev. J. HowLAND CoiT, Deacon, Minister of Bethel Church, 

Arlington. 
Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, St. Albans 
Rev. Richard Peck, Deacon, Minister of Calvary Church, 

Berkshire, Union Church, Montgomery, and Christ 

Church, Enosburgh. 
Rev. S. Brenton Shaw, Rector of Christ Church, Guilford. 
Rev. Benj. B. Smith, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, 

Middlebury. 

Lay Delegates who presented their Credentials and took 
their seats in Convention : 

BETHEL CHURCH. ARLINGTON: 

Noble Hard. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Hon. Dudley Chase, Thos. P. Russell, 

Luther Grover, Oliver Gleason. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN: 

Nehemiah Saxton. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: 
John Richardson. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 
Daniel Smith. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 

Abijah Williams. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK: 

Joseph A. Gallup. 



292 • JOURJfAL-1827. 

Kev. Abraham Bronson was elected President, and Rev, 
Joel Glap, Secretary of this Convention, 

On motion by Mr. Gleason, Resolved, That Mr. John 
Whitlock of Castleton, and Mr. Abijah Hawley of Fairfax, 
be admitted to honorary seats in this Convention; 

Whereupon the said gentlemen appeared and took their 
seats. 

Rev. Mr. Smith, Chairman of the Prudential Committee, 
presented the following Report, which was read and laid 
upon the table : 

Report of Prudential Committee. — According to the 
standing direction of Convention, this Committee has waited 
upon the Treasurer of the Agents ot the " Society's Lands," 
and examined the few documents he had to submit, besides 
those which were submitted to Convention in its last report. 
But as returns have been received from only four of the 
County Agents, and the principal pecuniary transactions 
have been carried on through them, the Treasurer found it 
impossible to present a full and satisfactory statement. He 
has, however, been called upon by the Agents themselves 
to exhibit a perfect account at their next meeting in August, 
which he obligingly promises to present to the public in the 
religious Journal published in this State. 

B. B. SMITH, Chairman. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the follow- 
ing amendment to the Constitution^ which was proposed at 
the last annual meeting of this Convention, be and hereby 
is adopted : 

In Article 2d, instead of the words, " The said Conven- 
tion shall meet annually on the fourth Wednesday in June," 
insert, " The said Convention shall meet annually on the 
last Wednesday in May." 

A communication from the Secretary of the House of 
Clerical and Lay Deputies of the General Convention was 
read and referred to a Committee of three, consisting of 



JOURJfAL-1827. 293 

Rev. Carlton Chase^ Rev. Benj. B. Smith, Hon. Dudley- 
Chase. 

On motion, the Convention proceeded to the election of a 
Standing Committee for the year ensuing, when the follow- 
ing gentlemen were duly elected : Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
Rev.. Benj. B. Smith, Rev. S. Brenton Shaw, Rev. Joel Clap, 
Rev. Sylvester Nash. 

The Convention adjourned for the purpose of attending 
Divine Service. 

Morning prayers were read by Rev. Benj. B. Smith, and a 
Sermon preached by Rev. Sylvester Nash ; the Holy Com- 
munion was administered by the Rev. President. After 
which the Convention met according to adjournment, and 
adjourned until 4 o'clock this afternoon. 

Wednesday, 4 o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment. 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund presented the 

following Report, which was read and accepted : 

Joel Clap, Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, 

In account with the Convention : Dr. 
To Cash then on hand as per report of 1826, .... $45.83 
To Cash per Rev. Mr. Shaw, Contribution from Christ 

Church, Guilford, received in Oct. 1826, .... 5.00 
To contributions this day taken up in Christ Church, Bethel, 7.93 
To contributions of Zion Church, Manchester, .... 3.06 

Christ Church, Guilford, 5.06 

Itnmanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . . 6.50 

Christ Church, Bethel, 8.56 

St. Stei)hen's Church, Middlebury, . . 5.50 

Trinity Church, Shelburn, .... 5.00 

Union Church, St. Albans, .... 4.63 

To interest on $33.83 one year, and $5.00 eight months, . . 2.34 

$99.35 
Per Contra : Cr. 

By 6ash paid D. Watson for printing Journal of 1826, . $ 12.00 

Balance now in the hands of the Treasurer, . . $ 87.35 

JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 
June 27, 1827. 



294 JOVRNAL-1827. 

The Committee to whom the jcommunication from the 
Secretary of the General Convention, relating to proposed 
alterations of the Liturgy was referred, reported the follow- 
ing Resolution, which was adopted : 

Resolved, That, the communication from the Secretary of 
the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies of the General 
Convention, he referred to the Standing Committee, to he 
reported upon at the next annual meeting of this Convention. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, the Report of the Pruden- 
tial committee was called up, accepted, and the farther 
consideration of the same referred to the next annual meet- 
ing of this Convention. 

On motion by Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Resolved, That 
the Prudential Committee be requested to concert measures 
with the "Agents of the Society's Lands," for procuring 
from the Society in England, such documents and powers as 
may be necessary, to render their grant permanent and 
effectual, and to adopt such other methods as they may deem 
necessary towards rendering their appropriation efficient and 
useful. 

On motion, Resolved, That the Convention now proceed 
to the election of a Prudential Committee ; 

Whereupon, the following gentlemen were duly elected : 
Rev. Joel Clap, Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard, Edward R. 
Campbell, Esq., Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Alexander Flem- 
ing, Esq. 

The Parochial Reports being called for, the following 
were read, accepted, and ordered to be entered upon the 
Journals : 

BL:THEL CHURCH, ARLINGTON. 

J. HOWLAND COIT, MINISTER. 

The state of the Church in this place is such as to excite in 
our hearts the most lively emotions of gratitude, although we 
have still much reason to lament barrenness and lack of zeal in 
the service of our Master. There has been for two years last 



JOUBXAL-1827. 295 

passed, more or less of an attention to religious things the result 
of which has been an addition of twenty-three to the list of our 
communicants. Our Sunday Schools, of which there are three 
attached to our church, are in a flourishing condition, and con- 
tinue to excite an interest in the minds of young and old A 
Bible class has been established, which is attended with consider- 
able interest by a few of the young people, and we regret to say, 
but by a few. A female prayer meeting, which is held weekly, 
has been instituted, from which, with the blessing of God, we 
anticipate the most pleasing results. 

The whole number of communicants, after deducting deaths, 
is 93; Funerals, 2; Baptisms, 4 adults; Marriages, 3; Sunday 
Scholars, 130. 

ST. MA^TTHEW'S CHURCH, SANDGATE. 

J. HOWLAND COIT, VISITING MINISTER. 

This Church was visited regularly once a fortnight, on a week 
day for about the space of three months, besides some occasional 
visits before and since. During the time of my visiting them, the 
services of the church were attended to with much interest, and 
some seriousness manifested. They have also had, occasionally, 
lay-readino-. I would affectionately recommend this parish to 
the particular attention of the Convention. The people are poor 
but pious, and ardently attached to the church we all love, and 
are hungering and thirsting for the word of life. 

The number of communicants, after deducting two or three 
removals, is 33 ; Baptisms (5 infants, 2 adults,) 7. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms - adult, 1; Marriages, 2 ; Funerals, 7 ; Communi- 
cants, 32. . 

The situation of this parish has not materially varied, within 
the year One communicant has been taken away by death, two 
have removed, and only two have been added. The two who have 
been added to the communion, are pursuing classical studies with 



296 JOVBXAL-1827. 

a view to the ministry. The Rector of this parish has recently 
commenced a course of lectures, on Sunday evening, in the east 
part of Dorset, where there is a considerable population, but no 
regular public worship. There has been an attempt made to es- 
tablish a parish library, and nearly twenty volumes have been ob- 
tained for it by donation ; but the organization of it is not yet 
completed. A Sunday School and Bible Class are continued, but 
not very well attended. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

B. B. SMITH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 2 ; Funerals, 8; Marriages, 4 ; Communicants, 46. 

By the persevering energy of this small parish, the great under- 
taking which has now been in hand two years, is nearly com- 
pleted ; and they hope to see a neat and substantial Church con- 
secrated to the service of God, some time in October. Whilst this 
interesting object has engrossed their chief attention, the people 
have not been wholly indifferent to other objects. Our Sunday 
School of nearly forty scholars, was never better conducted, or 
more useful and prosperous. 



CHURCH, FERRISBURGH. 

JOHN BRISTED, RECTOR. 



In the month of June, 1826, a few persons, inhabitants of the 
town of Ferrisburgh, in the county of Addison, organized them- 
selves according to the statute in such case made and provided, 
into the First Episcopal Society in the town of Ferrisburgh, and 
at the annual Convention of the Protestant- Episcopal Church in 
Vermont, holden at Middlebury, on the 28th day of the said month 
of June, 1826, the said Society was regularly acknowledged as a 
canonical parish in connection with said convention. In the be- 
ginning of July, 1826, the said Society invited the midersigned to 
preach for them every other Sabbath for one year. On the Easter 
Monday of 1827, agreeable to due notice, they met and elected 
their Church Wardens and Vestry-men, and also invited the un- 
dersigned to continue his ministrations aipiong them. On the 



JOUBMAL-1827. 297 

18th of June instant, said Society, in pursuance of a due notice to 
that effect, met and elected the undersigned* their settled minister. 
The Society is gradually growing in numbers and respectability ; 
neither of the sacraments has been administered among them. 
Nothing in the shape of a parochial library, as yet exists. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

S. NASH, RECTOR. 

By the blessing of God, the affairs of Union Church have been, 
on the whole, prosperous during the year past, though not as em- 
inently so as might be wished. The congregation has gradually, 
and it is hoped, permanently increased, and has been uniformly 
attentive and serious. And although it is not known that any 
peculiar degree of attention to the subject of religion at present 
exists, strong hopes are cherished that the Head of the Church 
will eventually give increase to the seed sown, and gather a harvest 
of souls into his Church, as heirs of glory. The present Rector 
took charge of the parish immediately after the last Convention, 
and has regularly officiated there three-fourths of the time, and 
had occasionally, extra services in the neighborhood. Soon after his 
entering upon the duties of the parish, a Bible Class was formed, 
which still continues. A Female Missionary Society, Auxiliary 
to the Missionary Society of this State has also been formed, which 
bids fair for permanent usefulness, and has already forwarded 
fourteen dollars and twenty-five cents to the Secretary of the Pa- 
rent Society, besides making a considerable donation to the Pas- 
tor. One afternoon in each week, the Female Communicants 
meet for devotional exercises, especially prayer, that the Lord will 
visit and revive his Church. An excellent organ, sufficiently 
large for the Church, has also been obtained, which adds greatly 
to the music of the Church. The number of Sunday scholars is 
small, but probably as large as could in reason be expected, there 
being two others in the place. 

Twelve Conmiunicants have been added within the year, and 
three have removed. Present number of Communicants, 24; Bap- 
tisms (adults 3, children 2,) — 5; Funerals, 4; Marriages, 3. 

*For the sake of uniformity, all signatures have been transferred to the 
headings of these reports. - 



298 JOURKAL-1827. 

CHRIST'S CHURCH, SWANTON. 

S. NASn, KECTOR. 

When I took charge of the Parish at St. Albans, it was ex- 
pected that I should officiate one fourth of the time at Swanton, 
which I accordingly did for about three months, when the Vestry 
thought it best for me to preach in Fairfax instead of Swanton. 
Consequently ray services in Swanton were only occasional after 
this. Early in the Spring, two families which contained all the 
communicants, removed to New-York. The operations of the 
Society have, therefore, for the present, entirely ceased. 



CHURCH, FAIRFAX. 

S. NASII, RECTOR. 



The Vestry of Union Church having advised to suspend regu- 
lar appointments in Swanton, they were transferred to a School 
House in the corner of Fairfax, about five miles from St. Albans, 
where several of the communicants of Union Church reside. In 
that place the services have been numerously and attentively 
attended, and it is hoped good may result. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

RICHARD PECK, MINISTER. 

Baptisms — infants 2, adults 10; Marriages, 1; Funerals, 3 ; 
Communicants (added 20), 51. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

RICHARD PECK, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (infants 5, adult 1) — 6; Funeral, 1; Communicants 
(added 3), 38. 

CHRIST'S CHURCH, ENOSBURGH. 

RICHARD PECK, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (infants 10, adults 3) — 13; Funeral, 1 ; Communi- 
cants (added 5, removed 3), 14. 



JOURJ^AL-1827. 299 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Communicants 40 - added 1 ; suspended from Communion, 1 ; 

withdrawn and dismissed, 2. r^.^^ro\^ lias 

ThouMi the number of Communicants in this Church has 
diminished, since the report of 1826, yet it is believed that the 
t u i tere t. and prosperity of the Church have been in no degre 
mpa red by the chan.e. This Church cannot be represented as 
;: a prosperous state fits members and friends, however are very 
far from despairing of better days, days of prosperity and grace. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Communicants 69 - added 1; Baptisms, 6 ; Marriages, 2 ; Fu- 
nerals, 5. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

C. CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 2; Deaths, 2; Marriage, 1; Communicairts 46; 
SunS;. Schola;, 63. This Parish is considered by rts Iteetor, to 
be in a condition highly prosperous. 

CHRIST'S CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

SAMUEL BRENTON SHAW, RECTOR. 

The prospeets and condition of this Parish continue enconrag- 
ing, and after an experi,„e„t of nine years, it n,ay » -^ »- 
as having ac<inired a permanency of character. Tins is he 
Lord s doing," and, considering the pecnliarity of ,ts or>gm, ■ .s 
\^X "wonderful in our eyes." The Sunday Schools contam the 
: ;:f nun,her of scholars; and the religious P-*'-"-. J^- - 
i.od hv the Church, are eageriy read by the people. There have 
been since the last convention, 7 Baptisn,s, 12 Marriages, only 2 
Fn" rals and 13 Births. Present number of hab.tnal Oommum- 
lots M. Sunday Scholars, 75; and more than 80 fam.hes .ho 
meet 'for Divine Service in both congregations. 



300 JOUBJfJ.L-1827. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

JOEL CLAP, KECTOR. 

Baptisms — adult 1, infants 5 ; Marriages, 1 ; Funerals, 4 ; Com- 
municants, about 83. 

No essential alteration has taken place in the condition of this 
Parish during the past year. Very great inconvenience is still 
experienced, from the interruption of parochial duty, resulting 
from the partial support of their Rector, and arrangements are 
now in progress to provide for the adequate support of a Rector. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms (3 adults, 8 infants) — 11 ; Communicants, 81. 

The spiritual condition of this Parish is, we humbly trust, 
under the divine blessing, progressively improving. The Female, 
Missionary, and Tract Societies, and weekly prayer meetings, 
continue in very prosperous condition. The Sunday School is in a 
more flourishing condition than it has ever heretofore been. With 
a very commendable zeal, an ample subscription has been raised 
in this Parish, for the purchase of a glebe and the erection of a 
parsonage, which is in such a stage of forwardness as to promise 
its completion the present season; and it is confidently believed 
that a balance will remain to constitute the foundation of a 
Parochial Library. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, MINISTER. 

Baptisms — infants, 5; Communicants, 18. 

The prospects of this Parish continue to be encouraging ; 
arrangements have been made to secure the ministrations of the 
gospel one-half of the time for the present year; and under the 
divine blessing, it is expected the Church edifice will be completed 
the present season. 



JOVRKAL-lSm. 301 

The following persons were fippointed Delegates to the 
General Convention : — Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Ben- 
jamin B. Smith, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Joel Clap, Hon. 
Dudley Chase, Alexander Fleming, George Cleaveland, 
Esqrs., Mr. Royal Blake. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Clap, Voted, That the next 
annual meeting of this Convention be holden at Woodstock. 

Rev. John Bristed was appointed to preach before the 
next meeting of the Convention ; and Rev. J. Howland Coit, 
his substitute. 

On motion by Hon. Dudley Chase, it was unanimously 
Resolved, That a Committee be appointed to take into 
consideration the expediency of withdrawing from the East- 
ern Diocese, and of electing a Bishop for the Diocese of 
Vermont, and to take such measures as they may deem 
expedient upon that subject, and report to the next annual 
meeting of this Convention : Whereupon the following 
persons were appointed upon the aforesaid Committee, 
Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rev. Joel Clap, Hon. Dudley 
Chase. 

On motion, Ordered, That the Secretary be directed to 
publish six hundred copies of the Journal of the Proceed- 
ings of this Convention, at the expense of the Contingent 
Fund. 

After Prayers, and the Benediction, by the Rev. President, 
the Convention adjourned, sine die. 
A true Record. 

Attest 

' JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



The following passages are quoted from the Address of Bishop 
Griswold to the Convention of the Eastern Diocese, assembled at 
Claremont, N. H. Sept. 26, 1827. 

" To give you a particular account of the Churches visited, 
though to me it might be a pleasure, to you would be tedious. 



302 JO URKAL-1 827. 

When, through the Lord's goodness, I shall finish the journey 
now commenced, and another which is soon to follow, far the 
greater part of our Churches will have been visited once, and 
some of them twice or thrice during the present year. The 
Churches already visited are those of Rhode Island, and those also 
in Massachusetts, with the exception of those in Newburyport, 
Bridgewater, Greenfield, Ashfield, Hopkinton, and one or two 
others. I have also visited Hopkinton and Holderness in this 
State." 

" In these visitations one hundred and ninety-six have been 
confirmed." 

" To the list of Candidates for Holy Orders have been added 
George E. Haskins, Norris M. Jones, George T. Williams, Anson 
B. Hard and Charles Cleveland." 

" To the Order of Deacons, Robert B. Drane, Henry C. Knight, 
Clement F. Jones, James M. Tappan, have been admitted; and 
the Rev. John Bristed, Benjamin C. C Parker, and Eleazer M. P. 
Wells, have been ordained Priests." 

"The new Parish in Woodstock are engaged in building a 
Church ; and the one building in Middlebury is soon, if the Lord 
permit, to be consecrated to His holy worship. Several ordina- 
tions, with the same Divine permission, will soon take place iu 
that State." Episcopal Register, vol. ii, pp. 149 — 158. 



SECOND ARTICLE OF THE CONSTITUTION, 

AS AMENDED JUNE 27, A. D. 1827. 

The said Convention shall meet annually on the last Wednes- 
day in May, at such place as shall be appointed at a previous meet- 
ino', and all the Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church, re- 
siding in this State, shall be entitled to seats in the said Con- 
vention ; and Lay Delegates from the several Churches in this 
State, shall be entitled to seats in Convention in the following 
proportion, viz. each Church shall have the privilege of sending 
at least one member ; if it consists of ten or more communicants, 



J0URjrAL-lS27. 303 

it may send two members; and for every twenty- five communi- 
cants exceeding tlie number above specified, the said Churches 
shall be entitled to an additional member. 



OFFICERS OF THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CIIURCIl IN VERMONT. 

Right Rev. Alexander V. Griswold, D. D. President, ex officio. 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, First Vice-President. 

Rev. Carlton Chase, Second Vice-President. 

Rev. Joel Clap, Shelburne, Secretary. 

George Cleaveland, Esq. P. M., Middlehury, Treasurer. 

Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, i 

Rev. Joel Clap, > Managers. 

Joshua Isham, j 

Agents under the Provisions of the Ninth Article of the 
Constitution. 

Amherst Willoughby, Berkshire. Moses Lester, Rutland, 

William Barber, Enoshurgh. Truman Purdy, Manchester. 

Henry N. Jones, Montgomery. Enos Canfield, Arlington. 

Nathan Lobdell, Fairfield. Zenas Prindle, Sandgate. 

John Richardson, Fairfax. Alexander Fleming, ^e/^ti;s i^fl^/«. 

Samuel A. Wilkins, St. Allans. Thomas Leland, Windsor. 

Phineas Atwater, Burlington. Thomas P. Russel, Bethel. 

Joshua Isham, Shelburne. Seth C. Crocker, Randolph. 



304 JOURJ^AL-1828. 

1828. 

Pursuant to the provision of the Constitution, the annual 
meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Vermont was opened on Wednesday, May 28, 
1828, at 9 o'clock, a. m. in St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
The Convention was called to order by the Rev. Abraham 
Bronson. 

Present : 

The Rev. Moore Bingham, Minister of Grace Clmrch, Shel- 
don, and Trinity Church, Fairfield. 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Church, 

Manchester. 
The Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, 

Bellows Falls. 
The Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel, and 

St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
The Rev. Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, 

Shelhurn. 
The Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, St. 

Albans. 
The Rev. S. Brenton Shaw, Rector of Christ Church, 

Gui/ford. 
The Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rector of St. Stephen's 

Church, Middlehury. . 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials, and 
took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY: 
RuFUS Smith. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: ■ 
Abijah Stone. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 

Abijah Hawley. 



JOVUKAL-18^8. 305 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN: 

Asa Lyon, 2d. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Luther Grover, Oliver Gleason, 

Thomas P. Russell. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS : 

Henry T. Green, John Atkinson. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS : 

David B. Lewis. 

* ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 

Mansfield French. 

BETHEL CHURCH, ARLINGTON : 
Simeon Cole. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 

Gershom Gifford. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR : 

Jonathan H. Hubbard, Simeon Ide. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK: 

Joseph A. Gallup, Royal Blake. 

The Rev. Abraham* Bronson was appointed President, 
and the Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

The following report of the Prudential Committee was 
presented, read, and accepted. 

Information with regard to the present state of the trust reposed 
in the Agents of the Society's Lands, desired hy the public, and ex- 
pected by this Convention througli the medium of the Prudential 
Committee, remains still so limited and ill-defined, that their report 
might perhaps as well be dispensed with. Many of the lots still re- 
main unleased. Accounts from the County Agents are not yet gen- 
erally rendered. Expenses in recovery and upon recent suits are still 
unliquidated. Back rents in many cases are still due. And, in a 
vi'ord, the whole business is in so unsettled a state, that neither the 
Agents themselves, nor their Treasurer, nor your Committee, can 
possibly, in any limited time, reduce confusion to order, or present 
a lucid or satisfactory view of the actual condition of their affairs. 



306 JOUBMAL-1828. 

Your Committee can simply say, that this misettled state of 
things, and this protracted delay, have mainly resulted from causes 
beyond the control of the Agents, and entirely from the inconven- 
iences inseparable from public trusts connected with scattered 
property. No possible objection exists to the exhibition of the 
Treasurer's account as it actually stands : and that document is 
accordingly appended to this report. 

REPORT OF THE TREA31RER OF THE VERMONT AGENCY OF THE SOCI- 
ETy FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN PARTS. 

1828. 

The whole amount of monies received by this Agency from its 
first establishment to the present time (exclusive of sums 
allowed to the several County Agents for their services in effect- 
ing leases, and money expended ; and for services rendered by 
other persons in surveying the lands and organizing the busi- 
ness of the Agency — for all which payments have been made 
previous to this date, as appears by the Treasurer's books) is 
six thousand thirty-eight dollars and seventy-three 
cents. $6038.73 

The following payments have been made by order of 

the Agents, viz. 

Towards the expenses of sundry suits instituted by 
the Agents, and a suit instituted against them by the 
State of Vermont, which was decided in their favor at 
the last October term of the Circuit Court, the sum of 
nine hundred seventy-five dollars and fifty-five cents 975.55 

To the different Episcopal Societies in the State of Ver- 
mont the following sums, viz. 

To the Society in the town of Guilford, . . 315.50 

" Middlebury, . . 286.32 

Fairfield and Sheldon, 66.87 

" Swanton, . . . 32.00 

Shelburn, . . . 127.66 

" " Ferrisburgh, . . 36.00 

" " St. Albans, . . . 113.15 

• In all, $907.50 



JOVRXAL-1828. 307 

From the lands in Ferrisburgh it is supposed by the 
Treasurer that the Rev. John Bristed has received, in 
addition to tlie sum of % 36 mentioned above, the sum 
of $108 — making in all $ 144 — but as the accounts 
are not closed, only $36 has passed to account in the 
Treasurer's books. 

It should also be remarked, that the Treasurer has no 
return for the last year from the county of Windham, 
but has set down the full amount of rents secured in 
Guilford as received by the Society in that town — pre- 
suming that the whole was collected and received. 

Sundry payments upon orders in favour of Anson J. 
Sperry, Esq. drawn by the Agents upon the Treas- 
urer, in all, 330.00 

do. upon orders drawn in favor of Abraham Bronson, . 387.50 

do. an order in favour of Mr. Isham for monies by him 

advanced, 27.00 

Paid amount of an order in favour of Rt. Rev. Bishop 

Griswold, dated Oct. 15, 1825, 100.00 

Paid bill of postage for the last three years .... 13.19 

This sum allowed the Treasurer by the Agents as his 
salary for three years, ending June 1, 1828, at $50 per 
year, 150.00 

This sum paid Rev. Abraham Bronson upon an order in 
favour of the Episcopal Society in Manchester, for 
monies advanced by said Society in defending a law- 
suit in regard to the Church lands, 141.00 

Monies received by Daniel Chipman, one of the Agents 

in the years 1823, 1824, 1825, and 1826, . ... 1692.03 

It is perhaps proper to remark that Mr. Chipman has an 
appropriation in his favour for $337.58, for services 
and monies expended in the suit in favour of the Soci- 
ety against the town of New-Haven, and also another 
order for $17.00, for subsequent services — making 
in all, 354.58 

Has also $ 6 passed to his credit on the 
books for monies paid H. Richardson 
for blank book, 6.00—360.58 



308 JOVEKAL-1828. 

Whicli leaves a balance against him, as the 

books stand, of 1331.45 

Of this he has paid about % 800 towards a claim in 
favour of Mr. Hopkinson for his services in the New- 
Haven suit in the Supreme' Court of the United States, 
and has an account yet unliquidated, which, it is sup- 
posed, will nearly cover the balance which appears 
ao-ainst him on the Treasurer's books. 

This sum is due from the Hon. Dana Miller, who re- 
sii^ned the agency in Windham County about one 
year ago, and soon after failed — it is not probable 
that any thing will be realized, 106.63 

There is now in the hands of the Treasurer, and in the 
hands of the County Agents, subject to his order, this 
sum 708.33 

Amounting in all to $6038.73 
There is to be paid early in June about $600 to Mr. Atkinson 
for monies advanced by him in procuring evidence in England, and 
sending out a copy of the Society's charter under the great seal. 
There is also to be paid to the counsel in the cases pending $100, 
immediately. These sums will cover the amount which the Treas- 
urer can command within the next few months ; but he hopes 
early in the fall to be able to pay all arrearages of appropriations 
which have been made to parishes and an order for $100 to Bishop 
Griswold. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

CALVIN C. WALLER. 
Middlebury, May 26, 1828. 

To the wisdom of this Convention, upon the suggestion of one 
of the Society's Agents, it seemed best, at their last meeting, to 
resolve, 

" That the Prudential Committee be requested to concert meas- 
ures with the Agents of the Society's Lands, for the purpose of 
procuring from the Society in England such documents and pow- 
ers, as may be necessary to render their grant permanent and 
effectual, and to adopt such other methods as they may deem nec- 
essary towards rendering their appropriation efficient and useful." 



J0UB:N'AL-1828. 309 

Your Committee, on the day after the rising of the Convention, 
accordingly met the Rt. Rev, Bishop Griswold, and another of the 
Agents of the Society, and also the Attorney of the Agents, in 
Windsor, in order to prepare proper documents to be transmitted, 
for the purposes specified in the above resolution, by the hands of 
the Rev. C. Chase, then purposing soon to embark for England. 
Upon the failure of his purpose, this negotiation has been sus- 
pended from the want of a suitable medium of communication 
with said Society. 

JOEL CLAP, for Committee. 

On motion of the Eev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a com- 
mittee of three be appointed to take into consideration the 
expediency of taking any measures in aid of the Agents of 
the Society's Lands in this State, to render the execution ot 
their trust more prompt and efficient, and report to this 
Convention. 

The following gentlemen were appointed said committee : 
Rev. Mr. Chase, Jonathan H. Hubbard and Jos. A. Gallup. 

On motion, the business of the Convention was suspended 
for the purpose of attending Divine Service. Morning 
prayers were read by the Rev. Mr. Nash, and a Sermon 
preached by the Rev. B. B. Smith. After which the Holy 
Communion was administered by the Rev, President. The 
Convention then resumed business, and on motion of the 
Rev. Mr. Chase, adjourned until 3 o'clock this afternoon. 

Wednesday, 3 o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Smith, Resolved, That all 
Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church and candi- 
dates for holy orders in the same, who may be present, and 
are not entitled to seats in this Convention, be admitted to 
honorary seats in the same. 

Whereupon the Rev. George Leonard, of Cornish, N. H. 
and Mr. George P. Williams, a candidate for Holy orders, 
appeared and took their seats. 



310 JOVBMAL-1828. 

On motion by the Rev. B. B. Smith, Resolved, That this 
Convention now proceed to the election of a Standing 
Committee for the year ensuing. 

Whereupon the following gentlemen were duly elected : 
The Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Rev. 
Joel Clap, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Samuel B. Shaw. 

The following communication from the Secretary of the 
Convention of the Eastern Diocese was read, and, on motion 
of the Rev. B. B. Smith, laid on the table. 

MiDDLEBURY, Oct. 2, 1827. 

Rev. and Dear Sir: — 

It becomes my duty to communicate to you the following 
resolutions of the Diocesan Convention, passed at the late session 
at Claremont, Sept. 27, 1827. 

On motion of the Rev. C. Burroughs, Resolved, That this 
Convention think it desirable and important that the State Con- 
ventions of the Eastern Diocese should, previous to the next 
meeting of the General Convention, express their opinions relative 
to the alterations proposed in the Liturgy and in the Constitution 
of the Church by the last General Convention ; and that this 
resolve be communicated to the Secretaries of the respective 
State Conventions." 

" On motion of the Rev. A. L. Baury, Resolved, That the Secre- 
tary be requested to call upon the Secretaries of the several State 
Conventions composing this Diocese, with a view of ascertaining 
if any thin£(, and what has been done, for the more effectual sup- 
port of the Episcopate, and that they be requested to report to 
the next Convention of this Diocese. 
I have the honor to be, 

With perfect respect, 

Yours, &c. 

B. B. SMITH, Secretary. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary of the Convention 

of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont. 

On report of the committee appointed by the last conven- 
tion to take into consideration the expediency of adopting 



JOTJBXAL-1828. 311 

measures for the separation of this State from the Eastern 
Diocese, it was Resolved, that the further consideration of 
this subject be indefinitely postponed. 
The following Parochial Reports were presented and read: 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 4; Marriages, 2; Funeral 1; Communicants, 34. 

There is a Sunday School Society connected with this parish, 
auxiliary to the the General Sunday School Union of the church, 
also an Aiixiliary Female Missionary Society, and a Juvenile Fe- 
male Prayer Book and Tract Society. The course of Biblical in- 
struction to the young people has been continued, and, it is hoped, 
with material benefit. Through the instrumentality of this parish, 
a Library Society has been formed in the town ; and, besides the 
funds raised by the proprietors, it has received a donation of 
books, estimated at more than two hundred dollars, from a de- 
ceased patron. The Rector continues his Sunday evening lectures 
in Dorset. The parish have within a short time raised money to 
purchase a church bell, which is to be ready for their use in a 
few days. 

* BETHEL CHURCH, ARLINGTON. 

J. ROWLAND COIT, RECTOR. 

Communicants, 100; Baptisms (infants 3, adults 7) — 10; 
Death, 1 ; Marriages, 4. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

S. B. SHAW, RECTOR. 

Within the year past there have been baptized, in this parish, 
ten persons, two of whom were adults; fifteen couples have been 
married. There have been eleven burials and sixteen births. 
Five have been added to the communion, and one communicant 
has died ; present number, fifty-eight. There are in this parish 

*This report was forwarded after the rising of the Convention. 



312 J0UB:N'AL-1828. 

two Sunday Schools, containing between seventy and eighty 
scholars, and two Bible Classes of young ladies. There are 
ninety-two families which regularly attend church, and about four 
hundred and fifty souls in the parish. The church on the whole 
may be considered as flourishing. Although she has lost in the 
death of the Senior Warden an ardent and valuable friend, never- 
theless the Divine blessing has not deserted her. Her services on 
the Sabbath are remarkably well attended, and the hostility 
manifested by other denominations in former times, has almost 
entirely ceased. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 5 ; Death ( of a child by accident), 1 ; Marriage, 1 ; 
Communicants, 46. 

Of the names standing on our Register at the last convention 
we have lost several by removals, while our number around the 
altar has been kept good by additions. Although this parish has 
for several years had its Sunday School, and has felt somewhat of 
the good effects of those institutions, yet it may be reported, that 
during the past year the subject has excited a singularly deep 
and general interest. The method of inciting to industry by the 
distribution of graduated rewards has been laid aside. A library 
has been formed, consisting of one hundred and eighty volumes. 
The use of this, together with the constant exertions of the 
teachers to render the studies and exercises interesting, has been 
found to furnish a sufficient incitement. The school was not 
suspended during the winter. The rolls for this season will prob- 
ably show about sixty scholars. Exertions have recently been 
made to form a parish library, and made with pleasing success. 
The amount of subscriptions and donations for that purpose 
( mostly cash) is not far from ,one hundred and twenty dollars, 
which will be immediately appropriated. It may be proper to 
mention also, that during the year the ladies of the parish have 
formed a society for useful and benevolent objects — the principal 
of which are the distribution of the Scriptures among the needy, 
and the increase of the parish library. Their income for this 
year is estimated at about forty dollars. 



JOUBMAL-1828. 313 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

There have been in this Church the year past, 8 baptisms — 2 
adults and 6 chikiren ; 2 marriages, and 4 burials. 

The year previous, for which there was no report made to the 
last Convention, owing to the absence of the Rector, there were 
8 baptisms (all children) ; 2 marriages, and 2 burials. 

The number of communicants in St. Paul's Church is 30 ; the 
Church since its organization in 1816 having suffered heavily by 
deaths and removals, and four members having withdrawn them- 
selves from communicating, without giving a reason for so doing. 

The Sunday School consists of about 30 scholars. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 3, infants 5) — 8 ; Funerals, 2 ; Marriages, 1 ; 
Communicants, 88. 

On the first of November last, the undersigned left the charge 
of Trinity Church, Shelburn, and removed to this parish, and 
assumed the duties of its rector, since which time his labors have 
been divided between this and the parish of St. James' Church, 
Woodstock. The parsonage, very much to the praise of the 
parisli, is completed ; but it is a subject of deep regret that our 
expectation in relation to the establishment of a parochial library 
is not yet realized. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adult 1, infants 2) — 3; Funerals, 3; Communi- 
cants, 24. 

Under the divine blessing, the church edifice, in which we are 
now assembled, is very nearly completed, and much credit is due 
for the very great exertions which have been made by the parish, 
yet in its infancy, in furnishing it with a bell and organ, and 
fitting it up in such convenient order for the celebration of pub- 
lic worship. 



314 JOURJrAL-1828. 

A Sunday School, consisting of about 40 scholars, has been 
recently organized, under the superintendence of Mr. George P. 
Williams, which is in a very prosperous con.dition. And chiefly 
through the liberality of the ladies of the parish, about $30.00 
have been raised for the purchase of a library for the use of said 
School. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

B. B. SMITH, RECTOR. 

The new church edifice was so far completed as to be consecra- 
ted on the 14th of October last, but has been occupied as the 
regular place of worship only since the first of December. Since 
that time the congregation has very considerably increased. In- 
deed, upon a review of the last five years, it appears that it has 
nearly doubled. At that time about 30 families and 8 single 
male contributors, made up the whole parish. Death and remov- 
als have reduced considerably this number. I'he parish now 
consists of about 50 families, and 20 single male supporters. By 
a like review of communicants it appears that 30 were connected 
with the church at the first report of the present Rector. Other 
33 have been added during his ministry. But by death, removal, 
&c. the number is reduced to the same last reported. 

Communicants, 46 ; Baptisms ( infants 10, adults 2) — 12 ; 
Funerals, 4; Marriages, 7. 

The temporal interests of the parish were, perhaps, never as 
prosperous and promising. But whilst the very remarkable and 
gracious providence of God in this respect is very thankfully 
acknowledged ; there is the more occasion bitterly to deplore the 
indifference which prevails with regard to the real spiritual con- 
cerns of the Redeemer's kingdom ! May the immortal interests 
of the people experience a blessing far excelling all providential 
bounties heretofore received. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

LOUIS MCDONALD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 2 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 7 ; Communicants, 80. 
The present Rector has officiated in this parish from the first 
day of November last, to the present time. A Bible Class has 



JOURJ^AL-1828. 315 

been recently formed, from wliicli much good is anticipated. 
Thongli struggling with some inconsiderable difficulties, the affairs 
of the society are prosperous, and with the Divine blessing it has 
little to fear. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

S. NASH, RECTOR. 

Marriages, 3 ; Baptisms (two adults), 6 ; Confirmed, 7 ; Funer- 
als (11 unbaptized), 14; Communicants, 27; Removed, .3. 

Renewed exertions have lately been made in favour of a Sunday 
School, the result of which is a flourishing school of 75 scholars. 

The congregation in the corner of Fairfax continues nearly 
as reported last year. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON. 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Communicants (added 5, suspended 1) — 44; Baptisms (adults 
3, children and infants 7) — 10 ; Marriage, 1 ; Funerals, 4. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD. 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

Communicants, (added, 2 ; suspended, 1 ; restored, 1) — 69 ; 
Baptisms (adults 1, infants 4) — 5 ; Funerals, 2. 

There are several persons wishing to unite watli this church, 
who as yet by reason of great distance, or for other causes, have 
been prevented from doing it publicly on communion days. They 
will, it is hoped, improve the first opportunity of solemnly renew- 
ing their baptismal covenant, by faithfully coming to this holy 
Sacrament. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Marriages, 2 ; Funerals, 8 ; Confirmations, 19 ; Communicants 
(added 5) — 60. 



316 J0UR:N'AL-1828. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (infants 8, adults 1) — 4; Funerals, 3 ; Confirmations 
20 ; Communicants (added 22) — 55. 

CHRIST CHURCH, ENOSBURGH. 

RICHARD PECK, VISITING MINISTER. 

Baptisms (infant 1, adults 2) — 3; Funerals, 3 ; Confirmations, 
7 ; Communicants (added 3, removed 6) — 10. 

The following gentlemen were appointed the Prudential 
Committee for the year ensuing : Eev. Joel Clap, Hon. 
Jonathan H. Hubbard, Rev. Benjamin B. Smith, Thomas 
P. Russell, and Alexander Fleming, Esqrs. 

The following gentlemen were appointed Delegates to the 
General Convention : Clergy, Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. 
Benjamin B. Smith, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Joel Clap. 
Laymen, Dudley Chase, Alexander Fleming, George Cleave- 
land. Royal Blake. 

The following report of the Treasurer of the Contingent 
Fund was presented, read, and accepted. 
The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, 

In ACCOUNT WITH THE CONVENTION : Dr. 

To cash on hand, as per last report, $S7.35 

To oblation this day received, 10.68 

Contributions this day received from the following Parishes : 

Union Church, St. Albans, 4.87 

St. Stephen's Church, Middlebury, .... 5.00 

St. John's Church, Poultnev, 2.50 

Christ Chui'ch, Bethel, . \ 9.00 

Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, .... 7.00 
To interest on $75.35, eleven months, 4.24 

$130.64 
Per Contra : Cr. 

By cash paid David Watson for printing Journals of 1827, $12.00 

Balance on hand, $118.64 

May 28, 1828. JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 



JOURMJ.L-1828. 317 

On motion by Kev. B. B. Smith, Resolved, That the next 
annual meeting of this Convention be held at Middlebury. 

On motion by Rev. 0. Chase, Resolved, That in consider- 
ation of the report made to this Convention on the subject of 
the Church Lands in this State, it is inexpedient to take 
any further measures respecting the report of the Pruden- 
tial Committee, made to the Convention in 1827, and 
postponed from that time to this. 

The Convention adjourned until 9 o'clock to-morrow 
morning. 

Thursday, May 29th, 9 o'clock, a. m. 

Convention met according to adjournment. 

The following report was presented, read and accepted ; 
and the resolution contained in it adopted: 

The Standing Committee, to whom was referred a communica- 
tion from the Secretary of the House of Clerical and Lay Depu- 
ties of the General Convention, relating to certain proposed 
alterations in the liturgy, recommend the following resolution to 
be adopted by this Convention : 

Resolved, That this Convention are convinced of the expediency 
of making some alterations in the liturgy of the Church, and es- 
pecially of shortening the morning service: but the proposed amend* 
ments, taken together, are not such as they think best calculated 
to effect the desired object. They would, however, express the 
opinion, that the proposed form of a Preface to the Confirmation 
Office, is preferable to the one now in use, and if it may be acted 
upon by itself, they would recommend its adoption. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, Chairman. 

The following report was read and accepted : 
The Committee to whom was referred, by a resolution of yes- 
terday, the subject of the ""expediency of taking measures in aid 
of the Agents of the Society's lands in this State, with a view to 
render the execution of their trust more prompt and efficient 
having attended to the duties of their appointment, beg leave to 
report : — 



318 JOVRKAL-1828. 

That they consider it expedient and necessary, that measures 
be immediately taken for obtaining of the Society in England, 
the addition of three or four persons to the present number of 
Trustees, or General Agents, — and also of securing, if possible, 
a perpetuation of the board : 

That the agents who are charged with the collection of the 
rents of said lands, be requested to enforce the collection of the 
same as soon as they become due, and to pay the same over to 
the Treasurer immediately : 

That measures be immediately taken to cause to be leased all 
such of the said lands as have not already been leased, so far at 
least as the same may be practicable. 

The Committee conclude with recommending that the Pruden- 
tial Committee be charged with the duty of conferring with the 
Agents or Trustees, and of concerting and prosecuting measures 
for effecting the objects contemplated in this Report. 

C. CHASE, Chairman of Com. 

On motion by the Rev. B. B. Smith. Resolved, That the 
Prudential Committee be charged with the execution of the 
measures recommended in the above report. 

On motion by the Rev. C. Chase, Resolved, That the 
Secretary be directed to publish at the expense of the 
contingent fund, six hundred copies of the Journal of the 
proceedings of this Convention. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was appointed to preach 
before the next annual meeting of this Convention, and the 
Rev. Carlton Chase was appointed his substitute. 
On motion, the Convention adjourned, without day. 
A true Record. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

The following paragraphs are quoted from the Address of 
Bishop Griswold to the Convention of the Eastern Diocese held 
at Bellows Falls, Sept. 24th, 1828. 



JOURJfAL-1828. 319 

" Beiiif^ permitted, througli the Lord's patient goodness, thus to 
meet you anain, I proceed to lay before j^ou some account of my 
official performances during the year past, and of the present state 
of the Churches under our care." 

" Those which, since welast met, I have visited, including some 
few which, the Lord permitting, I hope very soon to visit, are, or 
will be, all in Rhode Island, excepting St. Paul's in Wickford, all 
in New-Hampshire, excepting Holderness ; and in Maine, with the 
exception of Gardner. In Massachusetts, all but those in Bridge- 
water, Salem, Marblehead, Ncwburyport, Lanesborough, Otis, 
Blanford and Lenox. In Vermont, all without exception." 

" The number confirmed is two hundred and thirty-two, which 
may seem to be small, but our parishes are also small, a few 
excepted.'' 

" During the year. Orange Clark, Joseph H. Rice, James H. 
Tyng, and Benjamin Hale, have been received as Candidates for 
Holy Orders." 

" The names of those who have been ordained Deacons are 
William Horton, James Everett and Norris M. Jones ; and of 
those advanced to the Priesthood, the Rev. Messrs. Richard Peck, 
Moore Bingham, Louis McDonald, Joseph H. Coit, Thomas W. 
Coit and George Richardson. " 

" The Rev. Messrs. Robert B. Drane, Joseph H. Coit, George 
Griswold, Moore Bingham and Benjamin B. Smith have taken Let- 
ters Dimissory from this Diocese, as have also several of our Can- 
didates, and have removed to other parts. " 

" Immediately after our last Convention in Clareraont, I pro- 
ceeded to visit the Churches in Vermont. I found the new parish 
in Woodstock going forward with vigour and zeal. Their new 
Church, the Lord permitting, will be set apart for its sacred use 
on Sunday next." 

" In Bethel, the Parish, with their accustomed piety and zeal, 
have built a very convenient house for the use of their minister, in 
which the Rev. Mr. Clap resides — his services being now divided, 
between Bethel and Woodstock." 

" In Berkshire, on the 4th of October, the Rev. Richard Peck 
was ordained Priest. His labours in that part of the State ap- 
peared to have been very much blessed; of which we had pleasing 



320 J0UR:N'AL~1828. 

evidence in seeing forty-five persons, witli much appearance of sin- 
cere devotion, come to confirmation. In Fairfield, also, on the 7th 
the Rev. Moore Bingham was ordained Priest ; but he has since 
left his parishes, Sheldon and Fairfield, which are now vacant." 

" The Church in St. Albans, under the pastoral care of the 
Rev. Mr. Nash, is flourishing, and his labours there are blessed. 
The Lord will not forsake a people, who do so much for His 
honor as that little flock has done." 

" In Shelburne, on the 10th of October, 1827, the Rev. Louis 
McDonald was likewise advanced to the order of Priesthood ; and 
was soon after instituted as Minister of that Parish, which the Rev. 
Mr. Clap had previously resigned. " 

"On the 14th, of October 1827, the beautiful stone edifice in 
Middlebury was consecrated to God's holy worship, by the name of 
St. Stephen's Church. The services in all respects of interest and 
solemnity, and we trust of profit, were not behind those on other 
like occasions." 

"In Arlington, on the 18th of the same month, the Rev. Joseph 
H. Coit was ordained Priest. He also has left that parish vacant, 
and has taken a dismission from this Diocese." 

"We have occasion for gratulation and praise to God for the 
progress of His kingdom in this sinful world. Among Christians 
generally, learning and the knowledge of the Scriptures are evi- 
dently increasing. On the one hand, enthusiasm is more and 
more tempered by rational piety ; and on the other, the form of 
godliness is more enlivened by its power. Serious Christians 
generally are becoming more sensible of what are the true prin- 
ciples of their holy faith ; and they better distinguish what an 
Apostle calls the 'gold and silver and precious stones' of religion, 
from its 'wood, hay and stubble.' They who have been acquainted 
with the Church for the last thirty, or even twenty years, must 
have noticed this remarkable change in the style of preaching, in 
the comparative regard for the distinguishing doctrines of the 
Cross, and the spirituality of religion ; and in a holy, disinterested 
zeal for imparting the knowledge of Christ, and the saving truths 
of His Gospel to all who are sitting in darkness, and are without 
God in the world. In our own country, at no other period has 
this change been so rapid, and so apparent, as during the year or 



JOTJBKAL-1828. 321 

two last past. It is particularly pleasing to contemplate the 
change in this Diocese. When, eighteen years since, it was 
organized, true Church principles, with few exceptions, were less 
regarded. The doctrines of the Reformation were not so generally 
and suitably enforced ; and it is certain that the authority of the 
Church, and of our General Convention, were held in much less 
estimation. IIow great since has been the change in the increase 
of our numbers, the union of our Churches, and the correctness of 
our principles ! If we bring into view, what to judge accurately 
we must do, the comparative increase of population in the different 
States, our increase, in the number of our Clergy, and Churches, 
and Communicants, has been greater than in any other of 
the northern or middle States. The union of our Churches, with- 
out interruption, has been, and still is increasing; party distinc- 
tions are happily scarce known among us ; and»they should be con- 
sidered our enemies who would introduce them. The true princi- 
ples of the Protestant Episcopal Church, can, I verily believe, in no 
part of this world be found in greater perfection, than in this 
Diocese. It is delightful to see the reverence which our Clergy 
and people now generally have for the order and worship of the 
Church, and for the General Convention. I cannot sufficiently 
express my thanks to the Father of Mercies, and the Head of the 
Church, that especially we have in this Diocese a body of Clero-y 
so decidedly attached to the Episcopal Church, and so zealous in 
support of distinctive principles, without any loaning to popery 
or abandonment of Protestant principles or neglect of Evangelical 
truth." 

"But while we offer the just tribute of praise to God for so great 
a blessing, let us not deceive ourselves in a vain confidence of boast- 
ing, nor because in these things we are much better than in times 
past, suppose we are all which we ought to be. We of the Epis- 
copal Church, are indeed too much given to commend ourselves, 
and we may even fear that the cant of sectarianism is growing upon 
us. A habit of complacency in thinking and speakintT of our 
orthodoxy, and the superior excellence of our Ecclesiastical system, 
naturally leads us to put too much confidence in our profession, 
and to be so satisfied with ourselves as to make less improvement. 
Let us not forget who it is that makes us to ditt'er from others ; 



322 JO URJTAL-l 829. 

and that for all which God gives us we arc accountable to Him. 
If in our religious privileges we are indeed more blest than other 
Christians, we are also more sinful,, and more to be condemned 
than other Christians, if we do not also as much excel them in the 
fruits of the Spirit, and a zeal for God. We cannot be the best 
friends of religion, except we are the most willing and most for- 
ward in promoting its general interests ; nor the best friends of 
the Church, if we are not the most active in doing that which will 
best increase the number and faith and piety of its members. Our 
Lord's rule is : ' By their fruits ye shall know them.' Truly to 
love Him is to believe His word and do His work." Episcopal 
Register vol. iii, pp. 165 — 1*70. 



1829. 

Wednesday, May 27th, 1829. 
This being the day designated by the Constitution of the 
Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont, 
for the annual meeting of that body, a number of the Clergy 
and Lay Delegates assembled in St. Stephen's Church, Mid- 
dlebury, at 9 o'clock, a. m. The Convention was called to 
order by the Rev, Abraham Bronson. 

Present : 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Q\mxd\,Mancliester. 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel ChMvch, Belloivs 

Falls. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel, and St. 

James' Church, Woodstock. 
Rev. Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelhurn. 
Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, 8t. Albans. 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials, and 
took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY : 

Horatio Seymour, George Cleaveland, 

Joel Doolittle, Dorastus Wooster. 



J0URJ{AL-1S29. 323 

TRINITY CHURCH, SIIELBURN: 

Joshua Isham. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: 

John Eichardson. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 

Abijah Hawley. 

The Eev. Abraham Bronson was appointed President, 
and the Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

On motion, Eesolved, That the President be, and he 
hereby is, authorized to invite Clergymen of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church and candidates for holy orders in the same, 
who may be present, to the sittings of the Convention. 

In pursuance of the above resolution, the Rev. George 
Leonard, of the Diocese of New-Hampshire, and the Rev. 
Moore Bingham, of the Diocese of New- York, appeared and 
took their seats. 

On motion of Hon. Dorastus Wooster, Resolved, that a 
committee be appointed to inquire into the expediency of 
petitioning the " Society for Propagating the Gospel in For- 
eign Parts," to appoint a new agency and new Agents, to 
superintend the avails of their lands in Vermont. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a committee 
upon the above resolution : Hon. Dorastus Wooster, Rev. 
Joel Clap, and Hon. Horatio Seymour. 

The Convention, was then adjourned for the purpose of 
attending Divine Service. Morning Prayers were read by 
the Rev. Mr. Chase, and a Sermon delivered by the Rev. Mr. 
Bronson. The Holy Communion was then administered, 
after which the Convention met pursuant to adjournment, 
and adjourned until 3 o'clock this afternoon. 

Three o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

The following report was presented, read and accepted, 
and the Resolution, which it contains, adopted : 



324' JOTJR^'AL-1829. 

The Committee raised on the resolution presented by 
D. Wooster, have had that subject under consideration, and 
approve of the measures recommended by the committee of 
the last annual Convention, to which the same subject was 
referred, and they recommend the adoption of the following 
resolution : 

Resolved, That the Prudential Committee be instructed 
to continue their exertions to carry into effect the recom- 
mendations of the committee of the last annual Convention, 
to which was referred the subject of aiding the Agents of 
the Society's lands in this state in rendering the execution 
of their trust more prompt and efficient ; and that said com- 
mittee be further requested to procure from the Agents, a 
detailed statement of the proceeds of the lands in season to 
be laid before the Convention at its annual meeting in each 

year. 

D. WOOSTER, for Committee. 

Gershom Gifford appeared, presented his Credentials, and 
took his seat, as Lay Delegate from St. John's Church, 
Poultney. 

On motion of Hon. Horatio Seymour, Resolved, That a 
committee be raised to procure from the Agents of the 
Society's lands in this State, a full and detailed statement 
of the situation of the funds they have charge of, showing 
the quantity of land leased, the annual amount of rents that 
have been received, the amount that remains due, and the 
expenses that have been incurred, and other disbursements, 
for the use of the Convention. 

The following gentlemen were appointed a committee to 
carry into effect the foregoing resolution : Hon. Dorastus 
Wooster, Horatio Seymour, and Joel Doolittle. 

On motion of Hon. U. Wooster, Resolved, That a com- 
mittee of three be appointed to nominate four suitable per- 
sons, residents of the State of Vermont, to be recommended 
by this Convention to the Society, to be appointed addi- 



JO URMAL-l 829. 325 

tional Agents, agreeably to a foregoing resolution of this 
Convention. 

The following committee was accordingly appointed : Rev. 
Carlton Chase, Joshua Isham, and Dorastus Wooster. 

On motion, the Convention proceeded to the election of 
the Standing Committee for the year ensuing ; when the fol- 
lowing gentlemen were duly elected : 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. Carlton 
Chase, Rev. Sylvester Nash, and Rev. Samuel B. Shaw. 

The following Delegates were appointed to represent this 
Convention in the next General Convention : Rev. Abra- 
ham Bronson, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Joel Clap, and 
Rev. Sylvester Nash, of the Clergy. — Hon. Dudley Chase, 
G-eorge Cleaveland, Alexander Fleming, Esqrs. and Mr. 
Cyrel Fuller of the Laity. 

The following gentlemen were appointed the Prudential 
Committee for the year ensuing : Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. 
Joel Clap, and Hon. Jonathan H. Hubbard. 

The Rev. Abraham Bronson was nominated as a Trustee 
of the Ccneral Theological Seminary. 

Adjourned until 7 o'clock to-morrow morning. 

Thursday, 7 o'clock, a. m. 

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment. 

The following report of the Treasurer of the Contingent 
Fund was presented, read and accepted. 
TuE Tkeasuuer of the Contingent Fond, 

In account witu the Contention : Dr. 

To cash on hand, as per last report, $118.64 

To contribution taken np during the present session of 

the Convention, 6.56 

Contribution from Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . . . 8.40 

Christ Church, Bethel, 4.93 

" Zion Church, Manchester, 3.00 

Interest on $106.64 for 12 months, 6.39 

$147.92 
Per Contra : Cr. 

With cash paid D. Watson for printing Journal of 1828, $12.00 

Balance on hand, .... $135.92 
JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 



326 JO TJBKAL-1 829. 

On motion of Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Presi- 
dent of this Convention be and hereby is directed to issue 
in favor of each of the Delegates, Clerical and Lay, who shall 
attend the General Convention to be holden at Philadelphia 
on the 12th day of August next, his order on the Treasurer 
of the Contingent Fund to the amount of twenty dollars, or 
such proportionate sum as the state of the fund will justify. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the 
Secretary be directed to publish six hundred copies of the 
Journal of the proceedings of this Convention, at the expense 
of the Contingent Fund. 

The following report of the Prudential Committee was 
read and accepted : 

It is with deep regret your Committee are obhged again to 
report their iiiabiUty to exhibit a satisfactory statement of the 
situation of the lauds in this State, appropriated to the use of the 
Church. 

But one of the suits pending at the last meeting, is yet decided. 
In the suit instituted by the State for the recovery of the land in 
Berlin, which was intended to test the Society's title to lands held 
under the New-Hampshire charters, the decision in favor of the 
Society is confirmed ; the Supreme Court of the United States 
having decided that it did not come within their jurisdiction. In 
the other suit carried up to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, there has been, as yet, no hearing. 

But few leases have been executed by the Agents during the 
past year; and no meeting of that Board has been held. 

Your Committee have been waiting the arrival of a gentleman 
from England, through whom they intended making communica- 
tions to the Society in England, relative to the alteration in the 
power of attorney, suggested by the resolution of the last Conven- 
tion upon that subject. 

JOEL CLAP, for Committee. 



J0URJfAL-lS29. 327 

The following Parochial Keports were presented and read : 
BETHEL CHURCH, ARLINGTON. 

J. M. TAPPAN, MINISTER. 

By request of this parish, I commenced with them my labors 
on the 16th November of last year. For several months before 
my engagement with this people, the constant services of the 
church had not been performed among them. I found them quite 
anxious for the residence of a clergyman, who should be constant 
and faithful in breaking to them the bread of life, accordmg to 
the practice and principles of our church. An engagement was 
made with me to remain with them for the space of six months. 
That period has now elapsed, and a farther engagement for one 
year is now contemplated. In all probability, for the present 
year, there will be a heavy tax upon this parish, which will give 
some check to their ability for the support of a clergyman. Their 
attention and exertions are now turned toward the praiseworthy 
design of erecting a new house of worship. A new building for 
the accommodation of this congregation is considered necessary, 
and without doubt will speedily be erected. The people of this 
parish generally are much attached to the principles, doctrines, 
and services of our church ; and seem disposed to contribute 
cheerfully for the advantages which come to mankind through 
the gospel of Christ. And, upon the whole, prospects are en- 
couraging for the continued prosperity of this parish. 

Widiiit a few weeks, a Bible Class has been formed, and a Sun- 
day School of about forty scholars, is in a flourishing state. The 
number of communicants in this parish is one hundred.^ Since 
my residence here there have been five Baptisms and five Funerals. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

A. BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Communicants, 35 ; Funerals, 12; Marriages, 7. 

The Sunday School in this parish is continued, as well as the 
Female Missionary Society ; but though the congregation is on 
the increase, it cannot with confidence be said, that there is any 
evident increase of real piety. A good bell has been procured 
for the church, within the year past. 



328 JO VBiKA L-1829. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY, 

MOORE BINGHAM, MINISTER. 

C6mmunicaiits (Added, 2) — 15; Funeral, 1. 

Divine Service for one half of the time was commenced in this 
parish in November last, and has been continued to the present, 
and the parish intend supporting it the year ensuing, if possible. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

SAMUEL BEEXTON SHAW, RECrOR. 

Baptisms 9 — two of which were adults ; Deaths, 8; Marriages, 
15 ; Births, 20 ; Families, 92 ; Communicants (6 added, 3 died, 
and 3 removed), present number, 58. 

The Sunday Schools have been organized this season under 
very favorable circumstances, and contain about the usual number 
of Scholars. A library has been commenced for their use, con- 
taining more than one hundred volumes, and from which essential 
benefit has already been derived ; and we believe that the 
temporal and spiritual condition of the parish was never more 
encouraging. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

C. CUASE, RECTOR. 

Marriages, 5; Deaths, 3 ; Communicants, 40; Sunday School 
Children, 60. 

Although the congregation has greatly increased, insomuch 
that the attention of the Vestry has been called to the subject 
of augmenting the accommodations of the church, yet it has been 
so ordered by Providence, that removals have diminished the 
number of our communicants. The Rector has for more than 
two years, devoted one evening in each week to the instruction 
of a class of females in the Sacred Scriptures. The effects have 
been highly beneficial. Our Sunday School is as flourishing as 
we have ever reported. The parish library, which was commenced 
a year since, consists now of one hundred and fifty choice volumes. 



J0UBJ{AL-1829. 329 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

GEORGE LEONARD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 7, children 8) - 15 ; Sunday School Scholars, 
36; Marriages, 3; Burial,!; Confirmations, 8 ; and Communi- 
cants, 28. 

CHRIST'S CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 3; Marriages, 3; Funerals, 3; Communicants, 88. 
ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adult 1, infants 2) — 3; Communicants, 24. 

The Sunday School in this parish continues in a prosperous 
condition; and has realized the advantage of uninterrupted in- 
struction through the Winter. Its library consists of somethmg 
more than an hundred well selected books, and has been found 
much more effectual in keeping up the interest of the scholars 
than the former system of graduated rewards. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

J. BOOLITTLE, WARDEN. 

Communicants, 46 ; Baptisms (infants 3, adults 2) — 5 ; Funer- 
als, 2; Marriage, 1. 

Rev. B. B. Smith, late Rector, removed to Philadelphia in the 
month of August. Since which time there has been none but 
occasional preaching. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

LOULS m'c DONALD, RECTOR. 

Marriages, 10; Baptisms, 6; Funerals, 10; Communicants, 80. 

The present condition of this parish furnishes nothing of pe- 
culiar interest. Notwithstanding the removal of one family, and 
several deaths, the number of communicants^ is believed to be 
about the same as reported at the last Convention. 



330 JOURJfAL-1829. 

UNIOX CHURCH, ST. ALBAXS. 

S. NASn, RECTOR. 

Communicants, 38, — removed 3; Baptisms, 5 ; Marriages, 9 ; 
Funerals, 5. 

Service has been constant in this church during the past year. 
Of course, the appointment at the corner of Fairfax has been 
given up as a regular Sabbath day appointment. A five o'clock 
service has been attended there, however, by the Rector, generally 
once in four weeks, at which full congregations have always been 
convened. The Sunday school is believed to be in a prosperous 
state. 

A\\ the other parishes in the county being now vacant, occa- 
sional services have been performed in some of them by the 
Rector; among which have been, of funerals — one in Swanton, 
and four in Fairfield; of marriages — one in Fairfield, two in 
Fairfax, and one in Cambridge. 

On motion, Unanimously Eesolved, That this Convention 
approve of the publication of the Episcopal Register, and 
recommend it to the patronage of the friends of the Church. 

The committee appointed to nominate to this Convention 
four suitable persons to be recommended to the " Society for 
the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," as addition- 
al Agents for the management of the lands belonging to said 
Society in this State, nominated the following gentlemen : 
Jonathan Hatch Hubbard, Jonathan Hagar, Dorastus Woos- 
ter, and Alexander Fleming ; which nomination was unan- 
imously approved of by the Convention. 

On motion of Rev. Mr. Chase, Unanimously Resolved, 
That this Convention recommend, and do hereby recommend 
to the " Society in England for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts,"the Hon. Jonathan Hatch Hubbard 
of Windsor in the county of Windsor, the Hon. Dorastus 
Wooster and Jonathan Hagar, Esq. of Middlebury in the 
county of Addison, and Alexander Fleming, Esq. of Rock- 



J0URJfAL-lS29. 331 

ingham in the county of Windham, as suitable persons to 
be added to the present board of Agents, as attornies, to 
whose managemetit are entrusted the Society's land in this 
State. 

Resolved, That in case either of the above named gentle- 
men shall decline this nomination and recommendation, the 
Standing Committee of this Convention be and hereby are 
directed to name and recommend a substitute as soon as 
may be. 

On motion. Resolved, That the next annual meeting of 
this Convention be held in St. Paul's Church, Windsor. 

The Rev. Louis McDonald was appointed to preach before 
the next Convention, and the Rev, Samuel B. Shaw was 
appointed his substitute. 

On motion of the Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved that the 
President be, and he hereby is directed to draw an order 
upon the Treasurer of the Contingent Fund for the sum of 
five dollars and twenty-five cents, to be paid over to the 
Secretary of the General Convention for the benefit of the 
Contingent Fund of that body. 

Adjourned, without day. , 

A true Record. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund acknowledges the 
receipt of $ 6.00 from Union Church, St. Albans, subsequent 
to the risins: of the Convention. 



The following paragraphs are quoted from the Address of Bish- 
op Griswold to the Annual Convention of the Eastern Diocese 
held at Lowell, Mass. on the last Wednesday in September, 1829. 

" Prevented, Beloved Friends and Brethren, by the deeply af- 
flictive dispensation of a wise and righteous God, from being with 
you in Convention, I send you the Address which has been pre- 
pared for the occasion. " 



332 JO VBNAL-l 829. 

" The Churches in Vermont visited daring the year past are 
those in Windsor, Woodstock and Guilford. It is my purpose 
soon, the Lord permitting, to commence a journey through Ver- 
mont, and the Western part of Massachusetts ; and I hope after 
my return, and during the present year to visit others in the East- 
ern parts of the Diocese. Confirmations have been but one hun- 
dred and sixty-four — a number imusually small ; but we hope 
that they are of 'such as should be saved.' " 

" Of Candidates for Holy Orders, three only, George Bridge- 
man, Enoch Hale and Colton, have been admitted. Sev- 
eral young men from this Diocese, who pursue their Theological 
studies in our public Seminaries, have entered their names as 
Candidates in the Dioceses in which the Seminaries are ; and 
in consequence obstacles have been thrown in the way of their 
returning to their own States." 

" Of change by death, there has been one mournful instance; 
The Rev. George Richardson, who had for some time laboured 
faithfully in Charlestown and Drewsville, was, several months since 
taken from this to another, and we trust to a better world. His 
bereaved family have a just claim upon our sympathy, and com- 
passionate regard. Whether it would not be suitable for us, as a 
Convention, some way to notice such visitations of the Almighty 
is suggested to your consideration." 

" The Ordinations in the year past are eleven : Benjamin Hale, 
George F. Haskins, Orange Clark, Isaac Peck, Joseph H. Price, 
James H. Tyng and James Sabine, have been ordained Deacons ; 
and the Rev. Messrs. Clement P. Jones, William Crosvvell, James 
Everett and Daniel L. B. Goodwin have been admitted to the 
Order of Priests." 

" Changes by removals : Several of our Students in theology, 
how many is not exactly known, have been ordained in other Dio- 
ceses, and are not likely to return to this. It gives me, however, 
pleasure to state, that the Rev. Edward Ballard and the Rev. 
Anson B. Hard, though they have not obtained letters Dimissory, 
manifest a desire not to forsake us; but to bestow their labours in 
this part of the Lord's Vineyard, where they are so much needed, 
and where I trust it may truly and without offence be said, that 
the Providence of God more especially calls them. The Rev. 



JOURJfAL-1829. 333 

James Everett, as Chaplain in tlie Xavy, is ordered by Govern- 
ment on a cruise ; and the Rev. Mr. Fanner occupies the station 
at the Navy Yard in Charlestown. The Eev. Clement F. Jones, 
the Rev. Norris M. Jones and the Rev. Orange Clark are absent, 
and may not return. The Rev. Mr. Mott is also, in consequence 
of ill health, still at the South ; and the Rev. Mr. Cutler, it pains 
me to add, is obliged, from the same cause for a season, to leave 
us. The Rev. Joseph H. Coit and the Rev. Richard Peck have 
also removed from the Diocese. We have a valuable addition to 
our clerical body in the Rev. William Croswell from Connecticut. 
The Rev. Dr. Eaton has resigned the Rectorship of Christ Church, 
Boston, and officiates as a Missionary in that city. The Rev. 
Thomas W. Coit has taken the pastoral charge of the Church in 
Cambridge. The Rev. Mr. Price officiates in Salem, and the Rev. 
Lot Jones in Leicester. In Springfield is very much need of 
a clergyman, and also in Southvvick. The Rev. Isaac Peck 
officiates in Gardner, State of Maine, and in Saco the Rev. Mr. 
Olney. The Rev. Mr. Hard is in Sheldon and Fairfield, Vermont. 
The Rev. Mr. Tappan is in Arlington, and the Rev. Mr. Horton 
in Windsor. The Churches in Middlebury, Vergennes, Berk- 
shire, Montgomery and Enosburgh of the same State are vacant. 
The Rev. Mr. Ballard supplies the Churches vacated by the de- 
cease of the Rev. Mr. Richardson. The Rev. Mr. Bristed 
officiates in Warren, State of Rhode Island. He has made great 
exertions and sacrifices to obtain aid in building a Church there, 
though not with all the success that might have been expected. 
Grace Church in Providence has not yet a Minister ; and in South 
Kingston no one officiates." 

"Institutions : The Rev. Clement F. Jones into Trinity Church, 
Saco ; the Rev. Mr. Coit into Christ Church, Cambridge, and the 
Rev. Mr. Croswell into Christ Church, Boston." 

" New Churches dedicated to the service of God : St. James', 
Woodstock, St. John's, Ashfield, St. John's, Sutton, and St. 
Thomas', Taunton. The people who erected them are entitled 
to much praise for their liberal exertions and pious zeal. The 
houses are all commodious, and in good taste ; the one last named 
is a very beautiful edifice, and perhaps is no where excelled by 
one of its size." 



334 JOURMAL-1829. 

" Cliarches now building : Trinity in Boston, very magnifi- 
cent and soon to be consecrated ; St. Mark's in Warren ; one in 
Northampton ; one in Great Barrington ; one in Montgomery, 
and one in Arlington, in A^ermont." 

" New Parishes : Grace Church in Providence ; St. Mark's 
in Warren, and in Boston. This last has a new and valu- 
able Church edifice, and with due encouragement, may through 
the Divine blessing, become a valuable acquisition to the Church 
in that city. The Rev. Mr. Sabine officiates in it." 

" And let it not, beloved friends and brethren, seem irksome to 
be ao-ain and again reminded of the very essential importance of 
continuing and increasing in love and harmony among ourselves. 
We must all firmly hold to what we deem the true faith ; but 
should ' hold it in unity of spirit, and in the bond of peace.' Let 
us be well aware of that great infirmity of corrupt nature, which 
inclines us to differ and with bitterness to contend, about things 
of little moment. Nothing can be more contrary to the spirit and 
principles of our Church, which is distinguished from other de- 
nominations in nothing more than in its liberality, truly so called. 
For the bigotry and uncharitableness of individuals, the Church is 
not answerable. While she firmly adheres to all that is essential 
to pure Christianity, she allows great latitude for difference of 
opinion in smaller things. She carries this liberality so far, as to 
require, as necessary to Church membership, no other 'Articles of 
faith,' than those 'contained in the Apostles' Creed,' to which 
almost all who pretend to be Christians, might conscientiously 
subscribe. Let us imbibe her catholic spirit, without abusing it. 
Let each be persuaded in his own mind, and very cautious how 
he 'judges another man's servant,' or censures his Christian breth- 
ren. I wish in this Diocese to hear no distinction of high Church 
or low Church, nor of those who are, or those who are not, the 
Bishop's friends. Let us take heed how we stand by ourselves as 
holier or better or more orthodox than others, or as being exclu- 
sively Churchmen or Evangelical. They who make the highest 
claims to Churchmanship, may be deficient in some of its essential 
principles ; and others, in their manner of contending for the doc- 
trines of the cross, may depart from the spirit of the Gospel. Let 
us so judge, that we be not judged. " 



JOURJfAL-1829. 335 

" Since writing the al)ovc, my son, the Rev. George Griswokl, 
after a long and distressing ilhiess, has departed this life. His 
short career and earthly sorrows ceased yesterday, the 27th. 
Brethren, pray forme." Episcopal Register, vol. iv, pp. 165 — 170. 

" The following notice of the consecration of St. James' Chnrch, 
Woodstock and the Ordination of Professor Hale, which appeared 
in the "Vermont Repnblican and American Yeoman" the week 
subsequent, may be here inserted : 

"On Sunday Morning last," Sept. 28th, 1828, "St. James' 
Church, Woodstock, was consecrated to the service of Almio-hty 
God, by the Rt. Rev. Alexander V. Griswokl, Bishop of the East- 
ern Diocese. A large congregation were assembled to witness 
the solemnities of this interesting occasion, who evinced, by their 
respectful behaviour and serious attention, their sympathy and 
good feelings as to the completion of this work, so creditable to 
the zeal and liberality of the small number of Episcopalians, who 
undertook, and have thus, by the goodness of God, accomplished 
this pious work. It is very pleasing, at least to the true Church- 
man, to notice the very liberal manner in which this Church is 
not only built but furnished with everything necessary to the de- 
cent celebiation of Divine Service — with Books, Communion 
Plate, an Organ and a Bell ; and long may it remain, not only an 
evidence of the liberal spirit of its founders, but an ornament and 
a blessing to the flourishing and growing village in which it is 
situated. This work, we trust, has originated in no spirit of hos- 
tility or intolerance towards other persuasions in religion, but 
purely in a desire to enjoy the institutions of Christianity, as settled 
at the Reformation, by some of the wisest and best of our English 
ancestors, and by the holiest of martyrs, upon the model of the 
most primitive ages of our faith. " 

" In the afternoon of the same day, the Rev. Benjamin Hale, 
Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy in Dartmouth College, was 
admitted to the Holy Order of Deacons. " 



By the Convention of the Eastern Diocese at Bellows Falls, 
Sept. 24, 1828, the Constitution of the same was revised, and, 
according to rule laid over for consideration and adoption by the 
Convention of this year. By this Convention it was adopted. 



336 JOVRKAL-1829. 

The only material alteration, necessary to be here noted, was 
in the 9th Article of the old Constitution, which was as follows: 
" No State shall withdraw from this Diocese without the appro- 
bation of the House of Bishops. " The 8th Article of the revised 
Constitution which took the place of the 9th Article of the old 
one, was the following : " Any State belonging to this Diocese 
may withdraw from the same with the consent of the Convention 
or in the recess of the Convention of the Standing Committee, 
the approbation of the Bishop having been first obtained. " 



The affair of Berlin, alluded to in the Report of the Pruden- 
tial Committee in the foregoing Journal, was brought before the 
Legislature by the Agent of the State. His report and the sub- 
sequent action of that body afford some information and material 
for reflection. 

October 19th the Hon. Titus Hutchinson, Agent, made the fol- 
lowing " Report :" 
To THE Hon. Legislature of the 

State of Vermont, now in session : — 

The subscriber, who was appointed an agent in 1824, to com- 
mence and prosecute a scire facias^ to vacate the grant of some 
right of land, granted to the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, respectfully reports, to your honors, 
That he commenced such scire facias before the Supreme Court — 
That the same was removed to the Circuit Court by the said 
Society, under the provisions of the laws of the United States, 
and was there tried, upon various sets of special pleadings and 
demurrers, and the said Circuit Court decided in favor of the said 
Society — That a writ of error was brought to the Supreme Court 
of the United States ; and on motion of the said Society, and on 
their showing the value of the premises to be less than two thou- 
sand dollars, (the land lying in Berlin) the said court dismissed 
said writ of error; — so that the object of the scire facias has been 
defeated without obtaining the judgment of the Supreme Court 
of the United States upon the same. 

During the whole process, I have thought, and still think, the 
object well worthy of pursuit, till a final decision upon the merits 



JO VRKAL-1 829. 337 

shall be obtained. When I selected the town of Berlin, I under- 
stood there were improvements on each lot, and that the same 
were occupied as farms. But it now appears that the buildings 
occupied were all on other and adjoining lots. 

Of the sum of one thousand dollars, appropriated for this object, 
a little less than three hundred and sixty dollars have been 
expended, including some charges I have made for assisting to 
defend an action at law, brought to recover one of those society's 
rights of land. 

Should the Legislature deem it proper to pursue this object, 
it will be necessary to appoint a new Agent for the purpose ; and 
I should deem it expedient to pass a law, providing for a less 
expensive mode of notice in all such cases. 

The publishing the substance of the scire facias, and the order 
in some one newspaper, for a reasonable period of time, must be 
sufficient, without publishing the whole process, and order, in two 
papers, as seems now to be required. 

The summary of my account is as follows : 
The sums paid out for copies, postage, printing advertisements, 

services of the writ of error, and clerk fees, amount to $ 117.71 
My services and travelling expenses, including oral and 

written arguments and preparations for the same, $240.00 

$357.71 
Deduct, received from the Treasurer, 250.00 

$107.71 

Which is respectfully submitted, by 

TITUS HUTCHINSON. 
Montpelier, October 17th, 1829. 

Which was read, and on motion of Mr. William A. Palmer, 
referred to the Judiciary Committee. Journal, 1829, pp. 70, 71. 

* 

The Judiciary Committee, on the part of the House consisted 
of the following members: Messrs. Dennison Smith, Barre; 
Benjamin F. Bailey, Burlington ; William A. Palmer, Danville ; 
Samuel Elliott, Brattleborough. Journal, 1829, p. 31. • 



338 JO VRXAL-1 829. 

October 23d, this Committee, by John C. Thompson, one of 
the Council, made the following report on the report of the Hon. 
Titus Hutchinson : 

" To THE General Assembly, now sitting : — 

The Judiciary Committee, to whom the above report was 
committed, respectfully report, That the balance of the account 
therein stated, ought to be paid ; and that the said Hutchinson 
have leave to bring in the accompanying bill. They further 
report, that in their opinion, it is expedient for the Legislature 
to appoint an Agent to pursue and complete the business which 
has been commenced, in the said report stated. 

The Committee further report, that in their opinion, it is ex- 
pedient to pass an act, providing a mode of publishing the notices, 
in cases described in said report, and, therefore report the accom- 
panying bill. 

JOHN C. THOMPSON, for Committee." 

" Which report was read and concurred in ; and the bill report- 
ed by said Committee entitled, 'an act directing the Treasurer to 
pay the sum therein mentioned,' was read the first and second 
time." 

" Ordered, That it be engrossed and read a third time." 

" The other bill reported by said Committee, entitled, 'an act 
in addition to an act directing the mode of taking forfeitures of 
grants and charters,' was read the first time." 

" Ordered, that it be read a second time to-morrow morning." 
Journal, 1829, p. 115. 

This last bill passed through the usual stages and became a 
law. Journal, 1829, pp. 119, 131, 155. 

It does not appear from the Journal of 1829, that any Agent 
was appointed by the Legislature to pursue the course recom- 
mended in the foregoing reports. 

It is proper to add here an abstract of the decision of the 
Circuit Court of the United States in the matter of Berlin, ren- 
dered by the Hon. Smith Thompson, associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court, at Rutland, Oct. 1826. 

The King of Great Britain granted a charter of a town in that 
part of the province of New-Hampshire, which is now Vermont, 



JOURMAL-1829. 339 

to be divided among the grantees, and to be held on certain con- 
conditions mentioned in the charter. The defendants, who were 
one of the grantees, were a Society in England, incorporated by 
a charter from the King. A scire facias was issued on behalf of 
the plaintiffs, requiring the defendants to show cause why a for- 
feiture of their right to the lands had not been incurred, and 
assigning as grounds of forfeiture a non-performance of the con- 
ditions on which the lands were held, and violations of their 
charter of incorporation. On demurrer to the scire facias, held, 
that such violations of their charter of incorporation could not 
be thus collaterally drawn in question, but that it should be 
vacated by some direct proceeding for the purpose. 

Among the conditions of the grant were, that the grantees, 
their heirs and assigns, should pay rent and cultivate a certain 
portion of the land : Held, that no reasons of public policy ex- 
empted the defendants from the performance of these conditions, 
and that they were within their letter and spirit. 

Each grantee was to pay annually for the first ten years, an 
ear of corn, rent, for his share of the land, if lawfully demanded : 
Held, that this was a mere nominal rent, and its non-payment not 
a ground of forfeiture, and that the breach of the condition was 
ill assigned, as there was no averment that it had been lawfully 
demanded. 

After the first ten years a rent of one shilling for every hundred 
acres was to be paid annually to the grantor, in his council cham- 
ber in Portsmouth, or to such officer as should be appointed to 
receive the same : Held, that payment at the place appointed had 
been rendered impossible by the separation of the countries, and 
that the plaintiffs should have averred that they had appointed 
another place of payment, or an officer to receive the payment, 
and that notice thereof had been given to the defendants. 

There was no declaration, but the writ of scire facias was 
demurred to : Held, that the legal effect was the same as if the 
demurrer had been to the declaration, and the same judgment was 
ordered to be entered. Leave, however, is given to the defend- 
ants to withdraw the demurrer, so far as relates to the breach well 
assigned, and take issue upon the allegation therein contained. 
1 Paine Rep. pp. 652—660. 



340 JO URJi\iL-l 829 . 

According to the leave granted in this decision to the defend- 
ants to withdraw their demurrer as to breach of contract by fail- 
ing to cultivate, the case came up the year following ami waa 
aro-ued on its merits. Judge Thompson gave in the case the fol- 
lowing decision : 

On demurrer to several pleas, if any one of them going to the 
whole merits of the case is well pleaded and contains a full and 
sufficient answer, it will entitle the defendants to judgment. 

At common law, nothing that -lies in action, entry or re-entry, 
can be granted over ; and, therefore, no grantee or assignee of a 
reversion, can take advantage of a re-entry by force of a condition 
broken. But if it should be admitted that these principles do not 
apply to the case, and that the State of Vermont succeeded to all 
the rights of the crown, other obstacles growing out of the acts . 
of the State itself are presented against the claim of forfeiture. 
By the act of the 30th of October 1794, the Legislature granted to 
the town of Berlin, forever, the use of this land for the benefit of 
the town. The State thereby parted with all the interest it had 
in these lands, and is estopped thereby from claiming any right 
thereto. The doctrine of estoppel applies to a State as well as to 
private persons. When, therefore, a State by an act of its Leg- 
islature granted to a town forever the use of certain lands for the 
benefit of the town, it was held that the State, having parted 
with all the interest it had in the lands, was estopped from claim- 
ino- a forfeiture, by reason of a condition broken before the grant 
was made. Nor would it be a good answer on the part of the 
State in such case, that the grant to the town was in trust, and 
that the trust had been violated; the town not having been made 
a party to the proceedings, and the act not having been repealed, 
or any measures taken to resume possession of the land on ac- 
count of any breach of trust, or violation of the grant. 

Any one may perform a condition who has an interest in it, or, 
in the land whereto it is annexed ; and if a time to perform is 
appointed, the purchaser may perform. When a condition is once 
performed, it is thenceforth entirely gone, and the thing to which 
it was before annexed becomes absolute and wholly unconditional. 
Where the grant to which the condition broken was annexed, was 
originally made by the British Government, and the title of the 



JOURKAL-1830. 341 

State grew out of the consequences of the Revolution, and the 
forfeiture was incurred before the State had any interest in the 
land, it was held that the performance of the town accordino- to 
the terms of the original grant, subsequent to the grant made to 
the town by the State, saved the forfeiture. Judgment was 
given to the defendants upon the demurrer. 2 Paine Rep. pp. 
645—563. 

T. Hutchinson, for the plaintiffs. 

J. H. Hubbard, for the defendants. 



1830. 

Wednesday, May 26th, 1830. 
This being the day appointed for the Annual Meeting of 
the Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont, a number of the Clergy, and Lay Dele- 
gates, from several of the Churches, assembled in St. Paul's 
Church, Windsor, at 9 o'clock, a. m., the Rev. Abraham 
Bronson in the chair. 

Present : 
Eev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Church,il/awc7ies<er. 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Belloivs 

Falls. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel, and 

St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
Rev. Anson B. Hard, Deacon, Minister of Trinity Church, 

Fairfield, and Grace Church, Sheldon. 
Rev. William Horton, Deacon, officiating at St. Paul's 

Church, Windsor. 
Rev. Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelhurn. 
Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, St. Albans. 
Rev. William S. Perkins, Deacon, Minister of St. James' 

Church, Arlington. 
Rev. Samuel B. Shaw, Rector of Christ Church, Guilford. 



342 JOURJfAL-lS30. 

The following gentlemen appeared, presented their Cre- 
dentials and took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 

Teuman PurdYj William Benedick. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET: 

Daniel Fitch. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS : 

Almon Hopson. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY : 

Amon Bailey, Gershom Gifford. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON: 

Ends Canfield. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL : 
Luther Grover, Oliver Gleason. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK : 

John A. Pratt. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR : 
Edward R. Campbell^ Simeon Ide. 

Rev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President, and Rev. 
Joel Clap, Secretary. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Presi- 
dent be, and he hereby is, authorized to invite Clergymen 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and candidates for Holy 
Orders in the same, who may be present, to the sittings of 
the Convention. 

The following Clergymen were invited by the President 
to the sittings of the Convention : Rev. Moore Bingham, 
of the Diocese of New- York, and Rev. Benjamin Hale, of 
the State of New-Hampshire. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, that hereafter 
it shall be considered the duty of the Standing Committee 
to make report of its proceedings annually to this Conven- 
tion ; which Report shall be entered on the Journals. 



JOVBKAL-1830. 343 

The following Keport of the Standing Committee was 
presented and read : 

"At a regular meeting of the Standing Committee of 
Vermont, holden at Middlebury, on the 22d day of October, 
A. D. 1829,— present, Kev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel 
Clap, Rev. Carlton Chase and Rev. Sylvester Nash,— The 
Rev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President, and Rev. 
Joel Clap, Secretary. 

The Standing Committee having been informed that Al- 
exander Fleming, Esq. has declined accepting the nomina- 
tion, made by the last Convention in this State, as an Agent 
of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign 
Parts, the Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, 
Bellows Falls, was appointed to supply the vacancy. 

Georf^e C. V. Eastman was recommended a candidate for 
Holy Orders. 

A true copy of the minutes of the proceedings of the 

Standing Committee, for the year past. 

Attest 

' JOEL CLAP, Secretary." 

Ou motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a Commit- 
tee be appointed to examine the Canons of the General 
Convention, with a view to ascertain whether there are any 
matters left by those Canons to be provided for by the State 
Convention, and as yet remaining unprovided for by this 
Convention ; and that said Committee report to this Con- 
vention. 

The following Committee was accordingly appointed : 
■ Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Joel Clap, Edward R. Campbell, 

Esq. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Nash, the Convention proceeded 
to the election of the Standing Committee for the year 
ensuing. The following persons were elected : Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. Carlton Chase, 
Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rev. Samuel B. Shaw. 



344 JO VRKAL-1 83 0. 

The business of the Convention was suspended for the 
purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Morning Prayers were read by Kev. Samuel B, Shaw, and 
a Sermon delivered by Kev. Louis McDonald. 

The Holy Communion was then administered, after which 
the Convention resumed business, and adjourned until 3 
o'clock, this afternoon. 

Three o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met according to adjourment. 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund presented the 
following Report, which was read and accepted : 

Joel Clap, Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, 

To THE Convention : Dr. 

To balance on hand as per last report, % 135.92 

To contribution from Union Church, St. Albans, re- 
ceived after last Convention, 6.00 

To collection taken up this day, 5.67 

Contribution from Christ Church, Bethel, 5.00 

" Zion Church, Manchester, 2.37 

" Union Church, St. Albans, .... 5.71 

« Christ Church, Guilford, 3.25 

" St. John's Church, Poultney, • . . 3.00 
" Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . . 5.50 
" Trinity Church, Fairfield, .... 1.78 
« Grace Church, Sheldon, 3.18 

177.38 
Interest one year on $45.67, . . . 2.74 

180.12 
Per Contra : Cr. 

By amount paid Delegates to General Convention, 80.00 
Paid Secretary of General Convention, .... 5.25 
For printing Journals of 1829, 11.00 

96.25 

Balance on hand this day, . . . . 83.87 
May 26, 1830. JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 



JOVBKAL-1830. 345 

On motion, Eesolvecl, That the Treasurer of the Contin- 
gent Fund be not hereafter charged with interest on the 
funds in his hands. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Nash, Resolved, That the Secre- 
tary be directed to publish six hundred copies of the Journal 
of this Convention, together with the Constitution and the 
Canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church in this State, 
at the expense of the Contingent Fund. 

On motion by Mr. Oliver Gleason, Resolved, That the 
Treasurer of the Contingent Fund be credited the amount 
of interest charged him in the foregoing Report. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Nash, Resolved, That the Secre- 
tary be authorized to procure a blank book for the records of 
the Convention, and a trunk for the safe keeping of the 
records and papers of the same, at the expense of the 
Contingent Fund. 

The following Report was presented by Rev. Mr. Chase, 
chairman of the Prudential Committee, read and accepted : 

Your Committee report, that it is not in their power to 
lay before you any important facts relative to the Church 
lands in this State. Few settlements have been made, and 
few leases executed since the last report. Still the business 
seems to be moving gradually towards a conclusion. And 
perhaps it is not in the power of the agencies concerned to 
hasten it. Many obstacles have occurred, of a very peculiar 
nature, which scarcely any thing but time and a slow pro- 
gress of events could remove. 

A very important suit, which was pending at the last 
Convention before the Supreme Court of the United States, 
has been decided in favour of the Society. It became nec- 
essary, however, in consequence of certain papers not being 
seasonably communicated by that Court to the Circuit 
Court recently held in Windsor, that both that suit and 
certain others, should be continued for final trial and judg- 
ment to the October term of the Circuit Court. 



346 JOURJfAL-1830. 

The Committee, ia compliance with a resolution of the 
last Convention to that effect, have done what they could 
towards furthering the views of the Convention with respect 
to a more prompt and efficient agency. They met at Mid- 
dlebury in October last with the Bishop, Standing Commit- 
tee, and General Agents, to devise measures with that view. 
Sundry important papers were prepared to be laid before 
the Society in England. Those papers, owing to causes not 
within the control or the present explaining power of your 
Committee, were not finally executed. That matter lies of 
course nearly as it did a year since. We regret the delay 
exceedingly, and hope it can be satisfjictorily explained. 

C. CHASE, for the Committee. 
May 26, 1830. 

The following persons were appointed the Prudential 
Committee for the year ensuing : Eev. Carlton Chase, 
Edward R. Campbell, Rev. Joel Clap, John A. Pratt. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Nash, Resolved, That the Pru- 
dential Committee be and they are hereby directed to pros- 
ecute the measures heretofore entrusted to their manage- 
ment, in relation to the Agency of the " Society's Lands," 
so called, in this State : And also that they be authorized to 
fill any vacancy which may occur in the Board of Trust 
heretofore nominated. 

The following persons were elected Delegates to the Gen- 
eral Convention : Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Carlton 
Chase, Rev. Joel Clap, and Rev. Sylvester Nash, of the 
Clergy. Hon. Dudley Chase, George Cleaveland, Alexan- 
der Fleming, Esqrs. and Mr. Cyril Fuller, of the Laity. 

The following Parochial Reports were presented and read : 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adults 5, children 3; Marriages, 5; Funerals, 7 ; 
Communicants, 42. The Sunday School and the state of piety 
have considerably improved within the past year. 



JOURJfAL-1830. 347 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON. 

W. S. PERKINS, MINISTER. 

The present report embraces a period of only six months, the 
time of the present Minister's connexion with the Church. The 
number of communicants is not as large as in former years, owing 
to deaths and removals. It is now 83 — additions 2 ; Baptisms, 4 ; 
Marriage, 1 ; Deaths, 2. 

The temporal prospects of the Parish were never more encour- 
aging. To use the language of a member of the Parish, " Every 
thing to which we put our hands, connected with the well-being 
of the Church, prospers." The church is rapidly building, and 
though it is of stone, and entirely Gothic, we anticipate finishing 
it in less than a year. For commodiousness and beauty it will 
not be exceeded by any in the State. We regret to say that the 
religious condition of the Parish is not equally flattering. We 
are not, however, without some encouragement in this respect. 
A convenient lecture room, in which we now assemble, is crowded 
every Sabbath. The congregation listen to the preaching of the 
Word with apparent seriousness. Besides the regular services on 
the Sabbath, we have had a Bible Class on Sabbath evenings, 
consisting of thirty-five members. The funds of our Missionary 
Society have been (during the last year) appropriated to the sup- 
port of a young man at Kenyon College. Sunday Scholars, 70. 
The Minister has held meetings in different parts of the Parish, 
and is encouraged to continue this practice by the serious atten- 
tion of ihe people. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY. 

MOORE BINGHAM, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 8, infants 2) — 10 ; Funerals, 5 ; Removals, 7, 
or three families comprising seven members of the congregation ; 
Communicants (added 17), 29; Sunday Scholars, 16. 

This Church, during the past year, has sustained a great loss 
in the death of its Senior Warden and the removal of several 
families ; but has otherwise been greatly blessed and prospered. 

It has a Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, a Bible 
and Common Prayer Book and Tract Society ; as also a Sunday 



348 JOUR.YAL-1830. 

School Society, — all auxiliary to the general institutions of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

A place of worship is much needed, and the Parish have deter- 
mined to make an effort to erect a small hrick church the ensuing 
year. 

It hardly need he said that this small and feeble Parish needs 
some assistance, if assistance can be had. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURNE. 

LOUIS MC DONALD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adults 2, infants 3 ; Confirmed, 4 ; Married, 4 ; Fune- 
rals, 2 ; Communicants 70. 

The state of this Parish is disheartening, and the Rector is com- 
pelled to express his belief that it is not as prosperous as at the 
last meeting of this Convention. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

S. NASH, RECTOR, 

Communicants, 45 ; Baptisms — adults 3, children 6; Confirma- 
tions, 9 ; Funerals, 5 ; Marriages, 2. 

The members of this parish continue to struggle with commend- 
able zeal against the difficulties arising from the smallness of their 
numbers, aud, in addition to former efforts, have since the last 
Convention, purchased a house and lot for a parsonage, and are 
now exerting themselves to put it in a better state of repair." 

"A prayer meeting has been commenced under very promising 
circumstances, which is well attended every Sunday evening, and 
generally conducted by the Laity, as the Rector is often absent to 
attend a third service at the corner of Fairfax. The Sunday School 
is in a flourishing condition." 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD, AND GRACE 
CHURCH, SHELDON. 

ANSON B. HARD, MINISTER. 

The present Minister of these churches took charge of them last 
July, They were then in a languid condition, not having had a 
clergyman for some months previous. His prospects at first were 



JOVRKAL-18S0. 349 

discouraging, but by the Divine blessing upon his labours, a great 
improvement immediately took place. In Trinity Church there 
have been 23 Baptisms, 3 Marriages, 8 Funerals. Sunday School 
Scholars, 80. Communicants, 80. A Parish and Sunday School 
Library has been established. Exertions are now making to in- 
crease the number of books. In Grace Church, there have been 
26 Baptisms, 2 Marriages, 6 Funerals, Sunday School Scholars, 40. 
Members of the Bible Class 20. Communicants, 53. Additions 
10. The Female Missionary Society of these churches is prepared 
to constitute their pastor a life member of the Domestic and For- 
eign Missionary Society. The ladies have also made a box of 
clothing for the family of our Missionary to Greece, the Rev. Mr. 
Robertson. The Minister attributes much of his gratifying suc- 
cess to frequent lectures, and prayer meetings, which he has held 
in various parts of his parish. He has also, in company with Eev, 
Mr. Nash, performed service, and preached in the neighboring, 
towns. A church will probably soon be erected in Highgate. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (infants), 3 ; Marriage, 1 ; Funerals 4 ; Communi- 
cants, 88. 

The prospects of our Sunday School are more encouraging, the 
influence of its libaray is very salutary, and its members are in- 
creasing 

A Missionary Association auxiliary to the Domestic and Foreign 
Missionary Society was organized in the Winter, and measures 
are taken to solicit aid from every member of the Parish, and thus 
far a very general interest in the Society has been sustained. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adults 2, infants 2 ; Marriages, 3 ; Funerals, 2 ; 
Communicants, 25. 

The condition of this parish is assuming a more permanent as- 
pect ; measures are in progress which will probably result in the 
entire devotion of the labours of the Rector to this Chnrch. 



350 JOURJfAL-1830. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

WILLIAM nORTON, MINISTER. 

Funerals, 2 ; Baptisms, ; Marriages, 2 ; Sabbath Scholars, 54 ; 
Sabbath School Library, 95 volumes. 

Bible Class consists of forty members. Eight have been added 
to the Church. Three received from other churches. Since the 
commencement of the Bible Class, there has been an increasing 
attention to the subject of religion. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

CARLTON CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adult 1) — 8; Marriages, 5 ; Deaths, 2 ; Communi- 
cants, 50. 

Parish Library, 165 volumes, nearly all selected works. Provi- 
sion is made for adding to it about twenty-five dollars a year. In 
the Sunday School about 60 Scholars, with a Library of two 
hundred volumes. The Rector has a Bible Class, which has been 
attended with good effects. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

SAMUEL BRENTON SHAW, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 9; Marriages, 13; Deaths, 5; Communicants, 58; 
Families attending church, in both congregations, not far from 100; 
Sunday Scholars in do. about 80. 

During the past year a fine toned bell has been added to the 
church in the East Parish, and the edifice in the West Parish has 
been repaired. An unusual attention to religious subjects exists 
in the latter parish, from which, with the Divine blessing, we are 
encouraged to anticipate the most pleasing results. A Sunday 
School Society, auxiliary to the union of our church, has been 
formed, which promises greater efficiency in promoting the moral 
and religious instruction of the young. On the whole, the Rector 
has abundant cause for gratitude, and encouragement that notwith- 
standing many difficulties, the prospects of this portion of the 
Zion of our God are more encouraging than at any former period 
of his connection with it. 



JOURJfJ.L-1830. 351 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Hard, Eesolved, That the next 
annual Convention be held in St. James' Church, Arlington. 

Rev. William Horton was appointed to preach before the 
next Convention, and Rev. Sylvester Nash appointed his 
substitute. 

On motion, Convention adjourned until 6 o'clock, to-mor- 
row morning. 

Thursday, May 27, 6 o'clock, a. m. 

Convention met according to adjournment. 

Rev. Mr. Chase, on behalf of the Committee appointed 
yesterday to examine the Canons, made a verbal report ; 
whereupon it was Resolved, That the subject be recommitted 
to the same Committee, to report to the next Convention. 
After Prayers by the President, adjourned without day. 
A true Record. 

Attest, 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

CONSTITUTION 

OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE STATE OF 
VERMONT, AS REVISED AND ADOPTED IN CONVENTION, 

A. D. 1820, 1824 and 1827. 

Article I. The various Churches in Vermont shall be 
considered as united in one Convention, in subordination to 
the General Convention of the United States. 

Art. II. The said Convention shall meet annually on 
the last Wednesday in May, at such place as shall be ap- 
pointed at a previous meeting ; and all the Clergymen of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, residing in this State, shall 
be entitled to seats in this Convention ; and Lay Delegates 
from the several Churches in this State, shall be entitled to 
seats in the said Convention in the following proportion, viz. 
each Church shall have the privilege of sending at least one 
member ; if it consists of ten or more communicants, it may 
send two members ; and for every twenty-five communicants 



352 JOVnKAL-1830. 

exceediag the number above specified, the said Churches 
shall be entitled to one additional member. 

Art. III. The Convention shall deliberate • and act in 
one body ; but shall vote in distinct orders, when any mem- 
ber shall call for such a division on any one question ; and 
in such case a concurrence of a majority of both orders shall 
be necessary to constitute a vote. 

Art. IV. A President, Secretary, and Standing Com- 
mittee shall be chosen at every annual meeting of the Con- 
vention ; also the requisite Delegation shall be annually 
appointed to represent this State in the General Convention. 

Provided, however, That no person shall be a member of 
the Standing Committee, or shall represent this State in the 
General Convention, unless he be a regular communicant in 
the Church. Provided, also. That when the Bishop of the 
Diocese shall be present in Convention, he shall, ex officio, 
be President. 

The Convention may from time to time, if deemed expe- 
dient, appoint a Prudential Committee to superintend the 
prudential concerns of the Church. 

Art. V. If at any time a Bishop is to be elected by this 
Convention, the Secretary, by order of the President or 
Standing Committee, shall write to the Minister or one of 
the Wardens of each Church, at least six weeks before the 
election is to take place, and give notice of the time and 
place appointed for such election, and request that Dele- 
gates may attend the Convention for the purpose ; and in 
every such election, the Convention shall vote in distinct 
orders — the Clerical order shall make a nomination by bal- 
lot, and a majority of the Lay Delegates shall approve the 
appointment, before the person shall be considered elected. 

Art. VI. No alteration shall be made in this Constitu- 
tion except in annual Convention ; nor unless proposed and 
reduced to writing at a previous Convention. 



JOUBJiAL-1830. 353 

Art. VII. The Bishop or Standing Committee shall 
have power to call a special Convention, by giving six weeks 
previous notice to the Minister or one of the Wardens of 
each particular Church. 

CANONS 

OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN THE STATE 

OF VERMONT, ADOPTED IN CONVENTION AT 

MIDLEBURY, JUNE 24, 1823. 

CANON I. 

OF THE MODE OF TRYING CLERGYMEN ACCUSED OF MISDE- 
MEANOR. 

Whenever the Standing Committee shall have reason to suspect 
any Clergyman of this Church to be guilty of infidelity, heresy, 
vice, or irregularity of any kind, it shall be their duty to inquire 
into the circumstances of the case ; and if, upon such inquiry, 
they are convinced that there exists sufficient cause of complaint, 
they shall represent the same to the Bishop, at the same time 
stating specifically whereof the party is accused ; whereupon, by 
order of the Bishop, a council of Presbyters, consisting of not less 
than three, shall be convened, who, under the direction of the 
Bishop, shall proceed in due time to try the party accused ; a copy 
of the accusation or accusations, and twenty days notice of the 
time and place of tiial being first communicated to such party. 
And furthermore, it shall be the duty of the Standing Committee, 
at such trial, to lay before the Bishop and his Presbyters, such 
evidence as they may be able to obtain relative to the case under 
investigation. 

CANON II. 

OF THE FORMING AND ORGANIZING OF CHURCHES. 
Whenever any number of persons in this State shall form 
themselves into a regular society of the Protestant Episcopal 
faith, in such a manner as that they will become a body corporate 
according to law, and their proceedings shall be sanctioned by the 
Bishop of the Diocese and Standing Committee of this State ; or 
in case of a vacancy in the Episcopal office, by the State Couven- 



354 JOTJRKAL-1830. 

tion or its Standing Committee, they shall be admitted to all the 
rights and privileges of a regular church, subject at all times to 
the authority and discipline of said Bishop, or in case of a vacan- 
cy in the Episcopal office, of said Convention or its Standing 
Committee. 



The following paragraphs from the Address of Bishop Griswold 
to the Annual Convention of the Eastern Diocese held in Trinity 
Church, Boston, Sept. 29, 1830, properly belong to the foregoing 
Journal. They are copied from the Journal of the Convention : 

"Again, Respected Friends and Brethren, has the rapid course 
of revolving time brought about the season of our annual Conven- 
tion ; and, through the Lord's patient goodness, we are once more 
permitted to assemble and take counsel together on what concerns 
that portion of the Lord's Vineyard committed to our care." 

" In laying before you, as our rules require, a view of the progress 
of our labour, and the present state of our Churches, we shall have 
cause, more than on the like occasions preceding, to lament our 
want of laborers, and of missionary funds. Far from extending 
our borders, and increasing the number of our Churches, as in all 
human appearance might, with adequate means, have been easily 
done ; in many parts of the Diocese we have scarce been able to 
maintain the ground which we before possessed. A considerable 
number of our parishes, from being so long either wholly vacant 
or destitute of any permanent ministrations, are, we fear, declining. 
That so many of those whom we bring forward for the sacred 
ministry should leave us, and our Churches be left to suffer, has 
caused me very great anxiety and sorrow. But still we have 
much cause of thankfulness to Him whose mercy endureth forever. 
All have not forsaken us, and they who have left this Diocese, will 
labour profitably no doubt in other parts of our country ; and Chris- 
tians cannot be too cautious how they are influenced by local par- 
tialities, or selfish views. Those of our Churches, which have had 
the constant labours of pious, faithful ministers, have generally been 
blessed with prosperity and increase." 

" 'To depart and be with Christ is better' for His faithful min- 
isters, than any good which they can hope for in this present life ; 



JOVRKAL-1830. 355 

but to abide here is more needful for His Church ; and it is an 
additional cause of thankfulness that the clergy of this Diocese 
have generally been blessed with life and health. Till within a 
few mournful weeks, I had indulged the hope of congratulating 
my clerical brethren on this occasion, and reporting, that, during 
the year past, none had by death been taken from our number ; 
but recent and mournful tidings have brought us a very painful 
exception. I scarce need mention what you all so well know and 
feel, that the highly respected Rector of this Church" — the Rev. 
J. S. J. Gardner, D. D. — "has been removed from his labor here 
on earth. Many recollections of things past, and other affecting 
considerations, must on this occasion fill our hearts with sadness, 
'sorrowing most of all that we shall see his face no more.' With 
his surviving family, and many worthy, ardent friends, we are 
called, and, I trust, we are all disposed to mingle the sympathizing 
tear ; and also to lift our hearts in humble prayer to the Father 
of mercies and God of all comfort, that He will sanctify this 
mournful event to the congregation of His people who worship in 
this house ; that the death of him, who has so long labored in 
word and doctrine among them, may be so blessed as to conduce 
to their spiritual benefit. To us of the clergy, and to myself 
chiefly, should this bereavement be an awakening admonition to 
be faithful and diligent in whatever our hand findeth to do, and 
prepared to render an account of our stewardships." 

" During the year now past, several of the most promising, use- 
ful and eminent of our clergy, in other parts of our country, have 
been called from their labour, to receive their reward ; and among 
them are numbered two of our most able, zealous and active 
Bishops, arrested by the messenger of God in the midst of their 
usefulness and honors :" Bishops Ravenscroft and Hobart. " But 
heing dead they will yet speak, and by us may their voice be so heard, 
as to awaken in us all a more .ardent desire to emulate their zeal, and 
share with them in glory. Many view it as what they term a tnys- 
terious providence, that, in such frequent instances, those ministers 
of Christ, of whom we have the bighest expectations, and seeming- 
ly the Church has most need, should the first, and the earliest in 
life, be taken away. But God seeth not as men see : in His uner- 
ring wisdom this may be one of the reasons that they are taken 



356 JO VRKAL-1 83 0. 

from us : we think of them too highly : we naturally and very 
much incline to ascribe to human talent, and secondary causes, 
the glory which belongs to God only. Our idols it may be are 
removed, that the Lord may be our God. But for whatever pur- 
pose, in the counsels of unerring wisdom, we are thus visited, it 
is evidently the duty of us, who are yet spared, to redeem the 
time ; to be more active and diligent in performing the duties, and 
increasing the numbers of the ministers of Christ." 

"In this Diocese, in the past year, the increase has been but 
small. Three only, Henry Blackaller, Silas A. Crane and Chaun- 
cey Colton, have been ordained Deacons. The Rev, Messrs. James 
Sabine, Isaac Peck, Henry Blackaller, Samuel Fuller, George W. 
Hathaway and Edward Ballard, Deacons, have been admitted to 
the order of Presbyters. George V. C, Eastman, Jacob Pierson, 
Ephraim Monroe, Matthias Monroe, Charles E, Leverett, Joseph 
M, Brown, Samuel B. Babcock, Jo.siah M. Bartlett, Francis A. 
Foxcroft, Samuel M'Burney and Mark Anthony D' Wolfe Howe, 
eleven in number, and four of them natives of Bristol, in Rhode 
Island, have been admitted as Candidates for Holy Orders. — 
George Bridgman, one of our former Candidates, has left this 
Diocese, being regularly dismissed. Also, the Rev. Messrs. Orange 
Clark, James H. Tyng, Thomas S. W. Mott, Norris M. Jones and 
James M, Tappan, have taken, at their own request, letters dimis- 
sory to other parts of the country. The Rev. Chauncey Colton 
is officiating in the Diocese of New-York. The Rev. George 
Leonard did also take a dismission to Virginia ; but has since 
returned, and we hope may continue his labors in this Diocese. 
The Rev. William S. Perkins, the Rev. Samuel Fuller, and the 
Rev. William S. Potter, I am happy to state, have been added 
unto us ; and the Rev. George W. Hathaway, who had for some 
time resided among us, has been also canonically transferred to 
this Diocese." 

" In Vermont the Churches in Berkshire, Montgomery and 
some other places, are still vacant and suffering. The ministry 
of the Rev, Mr. Hard in Fairfield and in Sheldon is much blessed. 
He and the Rev. Mr. Nash perform missionary duties in several 
towns adjoining, and with good effect. The liberality of the 
little parish in St. Albans, and their pious exertions to support 



JO URXAL-1 83 0. 357 

their minister and in purcliasinp: a house for his use are worthy of 
much praise. The parish in Arlino;ton has, with much cordiality 
and affection, called and received the Rev. Mr. Perkins as their 
minister, and go forward with the building of a beautiful stone 
Church. The Churches in Woodstock and Bethel, have, with 
like zeal, determined to have a minister in each. Their beloved 
pastor, the Rev. Mr. Clap, resides now and labors in Woodstock. 
The Rev. Mr. Sabine from Boston, it is hoped, will take the pas- 
toral charge of the Church in Bethel, and the Rev. Mr. Crane 
from Providence, of that in Middlebury. Should the latter parish 
after being so long destitute and suffering, be at length happily 
supplied, it will ease me of much painful anxiety. The Rev. Mr. 
Horton is called to the pastoral charge of the Church in Windsor, 
where he has through the year successfully labored, and where it 
is expected that he will be ordained." 

"On the 15th of July" 1830, the house erected in Warren, 
R. I. "called St. Mark's Church, was consecrated to God's holy 
worship. And in the afternoon of the same day, the Rev. Mr. 
Hathaway was admitted to the Order of Priests, and Mr. Crane 
was ordained Deacon." 



The " very important suit" mentioned in the Report of the 
Prudential Committee as recently decided by the Supreme Court 
of the United States, was that of the Society for the Propagation 
of the Gospel in Foreign Parts against The Town of Pawlet. 
This decision was rendered at the January Term, 1830. 

The case was argued by Mr. Webster, for the Plaintiffs, and by 
Mr. Doddridge, for the Defendants. Mr. Doddridge also presented 
the written argument of Mr. J. C. Wright, for the defendants, 
as did Mr. Webster, an argument for the plaintiffs, prepared by 
the counsel in the Circuit Court of Vermont. 

Mr. Justice Story delivered the opinion of the Court; Mr. Jus- 
tice Baldwin dissenting on the first point. 

This cause is certified to this Court from the Circuit Court for 
the District of Vermont, upon certain points upon which the 
Judges of that court were opposed in opinion. 

The original action was an ejectment, in the nature of a real 



358 JOUR.KAL-1830. 

action, according to the local practice, in which no fictitious per- 
sons intervene ; and it was brought in May 18*24, to recover a cer- 
tain lot of land, being the first division lot laid out to the right 
of a Society in the town of Pavvlet. The Plaintiff's are described 
iu the writ as "The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in 
Foreign Parts, a corporation duly established in England, within 
the dominions of the King of the United Kingdom of Great Brit- 
ain and Ireland, the members of which Society are aliens and 
subjects of said King." The defendants pleaded the general issue, 
not guilty, which was joined; and the cause was submitted to a 
jury for trial. By agreement of the parties at the trial, at the 
October Term of the Circuit Court 1828, the jury were dis- 
charged from giving any verdict; upon the disagreement of the 
Judges upon the points growing out of the facts stated in the 
record. The points were : First; Whether the Plaintiff's have 
shown that they have any right to hold lands ? Second ; Whether 
the Plaintiffs are barred by the three years limitation in the Act 
of the 27th of October 1785, or any other of the statutes of limit- 
ation ? Third ; Whether, under the laws of Vermont, the plain- 
tiffs are entitled to recover mesne projlls ; and if so, for what 
length of time ? These points have been argued before us ; and 
it remains for me to pronounce the Decision of the Court. 

The defendants pleaded the general issue of not guilty. 
This plea admits the competency of the plaintiffs to sue in the 
corporate capacity in which they have sued. If the defendants 
meant to have insisted upon the wants of a corporate capacity in 
the plaintiff's to sue, it should have been insisted upon by a special 
plea in abatement or bar. Pleading to the merits has been held 
by this court to be an admission of the capacity of the plaintiff's to 
sue. But the point here raised is not so much whether the plain- 
tiffs are entitled to sue generally as a corpoiation, as whether 
they have shown a right to hold lands. The general issue admits 
not only the competency of the plaintiff's to sue, but to sue in the 
particular action which they bring. But in the present case, we 
think, there is abundant evidence in the record to establish the 
right of the corporation to hold the lands in controversy. It was 
given to them by the I'oyal charter of 1761, which created the 
town of Pawlet. Among the grantees therein named, is "the 



JOVRKAL-1830. 359 

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," to 
whom one share in the township is given. This is a plain recog- 
nition l)y the crown, of the existence of the corporation, and of 
its capacity to take. It would confer the power to take the lands, 
even if it had not previously existed. The Society received va- 
rious other donations of the same nature, and accepted them. 
Besides, the Act of 1794, under which the town of Pawlet claims 
the lands, distinctly admits the existence of the corporation, and 
its capacity to take the very land in controversy, their title to 
hold being divested, and vested in the State by the Revolution. 
This question was decided in the case of the Society against New- 
Haven. In that case it was held that the Revolution did not 
divest the title of the Society. 

A certificate ought accordinglj^ to be sent to the Circuit Court, 
that the Plaintiffs have shown that they have a right to hold the 
lands in controversy. 

Upon the second question, viz : Whether the Plaintiffs are 
barred by the three years limitation in the Act of the 27th of 
October, 1785, or any other of the statutes of limitation? — our 
opinion is that the Plaintiffs are not barred by the three years 
limitation, in the Act of 27th of October, 1785, or by any other of 
the statutes of limitations of Vermont. 

There are good grounds why statutes of limitation should not 
be applied against grants for public, pious, and charitable uses 
when they may well be applied against mere private rights. The 
public have a deep and permanent interest in such charities ; and 
that interest far outweighs all considerations of mere private 
convenience. 

Upon the third question, viz. Whether, under the laws of 
Vermont, the Plaintiffs are entitled to recover m?sne profits^ and, 
if so for what length of time ? — the court held that the Act of 
the loth of November, 1820, which prohibits the recovery of mesne 
'profits in certain cases, applies to the claims to such profits by the 
Plaintiffs, except in so far as they can bring their case within the 
provisions of the third section of that act. The treaty of peace of 
1783, and the British treaty of 1794, do not apply to the case. The 
right of action, if any, of the plaintiffs, did not accrue until the 
year 1795. The entry then of the defendants was the first ouster: 



360 JOTJBKAL-1831. 

and at that time, in the action of ejectment, the plaintiffs could 
not have recovered any damages ; but would have been driven to 
an action of trespa>s for mesne profits. The Legislature was com- 
petent to regulate the remedy by ejectment, and to limit its oper- 
ation. It has so limited it. It has taken away by implication 
the right to recover mesm x>rofits^ as consequential upon the recov- 
ery in ejectment, and given the party his damages in the latter 
action. It has prescribed the restrictions upon which mesne profits 
shall be recovered ; and these restrictions are obligatory upon the 
citizens of the State. The Plaintiffs have not, in this particular, 
any privileges by treaty beyond those of citizens. They take the 
benefit of the statute remedy to recover their right to the lands ; 
and they must take the remedy with all the statute restrictions. 
9 Curtis' Reports, 160—168. (4 Peters, 480.) 



Although in advance of the Journal, yet, in order to finish the 
affair of Pawlet, it may be well to mention here that the Selectmen 
of Pawlet petitioned the Legislature in 1831, "for remuneration 
for expenses incurred in defending suits brought by the Society 
for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts," as did also 
the Selectmen of Danby for a similar purpose. These petitions, by 
the recommendation of the Committee on Claims, were referred to 
the Legislature of 1832. Journal 1831, pp. 16, 17, 88. 

In the session of the Legislature in 1832, these petitions were 
again taken up, referred to the Committee on Claims, reported on 
and dismissed. Journal 1832, pp. 19, 78. 



1831. 

Arlington, 25th May, 1831. 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
Vermont was opened according to appointment. 

Sylvester Deming was appointed President, and Enos 

Canfield, Secretary pro tempore. The Convention was then 

adjourned to meet at this place on the last Wednesday in 

August next. 

Attest, ENOS CANFIELD, Secretary pro tem. 



JOURJfAL-1831. 361 

Arlington, Auf^ust 31, 1831. 
The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
Vermont, met according to adjournment in the Vestry 
Koom of St. James' Church, Arlington, on Wednesday, 
August 31, 1831, at 9 o'clock, a. m. 

Present : 
The Right Rev. Alexander V. Griswold, D. D., President, 

ex officio. 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion (u\\vivc\\,Manc]iester . 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Belloios 

Falls. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
Rev. Silas A. Crane, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, 

Middlehury. 
Rev. William Horton, Minister of St. Paul's Church, 

Windsor. 
Rev. Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelburn. 
Rev. William S. Perkins, Deacon, Minister of St. James' 

Church, Arlington. 
Rev. James Sabine, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel. 

Rev. Joel Clap was appointed Secretary. 

The following gentlemen presented their Credentials, and 
took their seats as Lay Delegates : 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON: 

Sylvester Deming, Simeon Cole. 

Samuel S. Baker, Enos Canfield. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 

Ctrel Fuller, John C. Roberts. 

David Dyer, 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET : 
Daniel Fitch. Ashbel Hollister. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 
Amon Bailey, Timothy Marshall. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, RUTLAND: 

Porter Howe. 



362 JOURXAL-1831. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY : 
DORASTUS WOOSTER, GeORGE ClEAVELAND. 

UNION CHURCH. ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

Oliver Gleason, 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD: 

Edward Houghton, Jr. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS: 
John C. Hopson, David Lewis. 

On motion by Kev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Presi- 
dent be, and hereby is, requested to invite Clergymen of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church, and Candidates for Holy 
Oi'ders in the same, who may be in town during the session 
of this Convention, to honorary seats in the same. 

The following Clergymen appeared and took their seats 
in pursuance of the provision of the foregoing resolution : 
Rev. William H. Mitchell, of South-Carolina, Rev. Phineas 
L. Whipple, Rev. Moore Bingham, and Rev. Ah'a Bennet, 
of New- York ; Rev. Samuel B. Shaw, Rev. Silas Blaisdell, 
of Massachusetts, Rev. Edward Ballard, of New-Hampshire. 

The following communication from the Secretary of the 
Convention of Massachusetts was read, and referred to a 
Committee, consisting of the following gentlemen : Rev. 
Abraham Bronson, Rev. Carlton Chase, and Hon. Dorastus 
Wooster, to report thereon to this Convention. 

Cambridge, June 25, 1831 
To THE Standing Committee of the 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the State of Vermont : 
Gentlemen: — At the last Convention of our Church, in the 
State of Massachusetts, the following report of a Committee for 
the purpose therein named, was accepted hy nearly a unanimous 
vote : 



JOURJfAL-1831. 363 

" The Committee, appointed to consider the propriety and 
expediency of erecting Massachusetts into a separate Diocese, and 
if practicable, the means of accomplishing it, respectfully report: 

That if such an arrangement can be effected, with the concur- 
rence and approbation of the other States, with which it is now 
connected, and the Episcopal jurisdiction of the Right Rev. Bishop 
Griswold be retained, it is in the highest degree expedient and 
desiraVde, not only as respects Massachusetts, but likewise for the 
sister States of the Eastern Diocese ; the prosperity of the Church 
in each depending mainly, under God, on the constant oversight 
and frequent visitations of its spiritual father. 

As to the means : — The Committee recommend, that the Secre- 
tary of this Convention be instructed to communicate this report 
to the several Standing Committees of Rhode Island, Vermont, 
New-Hampshire, and Maine, earnestly and affectionately commend- 
ing the proposition to their consideration and earliest attention. 

E. A. NEWTON, Chairman." 

"Allow me now, in obedience to my directions, earnestly and 
affectionately to request your attention, at as early a date as possi- 
ble, to the proposed withdrawment of Massachusetts from the 
Eastern Diocese ; and that you will take such measures to forward 
the end desired by our Convention, as will accomplish it in the 
shortest time, consistent with safety, propriety, and the dictates 
of Christian courtesy and duty. 

Very respectfully, &c. 

T. W. COIT, Secretary of Conv. of Mass. 
To the S. C. of the P. E. Ch. 

in the State of Vermont." 

The following report of the Prudential Committee was 
presented, read and accepted : 
TO THE Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 

THE State of Vermont, assembled at Arlington, August 31, 

1831,— 

The Prudential Committee in presenting their annual report, 
beg leave to state. 

That judging by information, received from authentic sources, 
and by measures in which they have borne a part, they feel justi- 



364 JOUBJfAL-1831. 

fied in expressing the opinion, that the long series of difficulties, 
which the Church has had to encounter, beyond all possibility of 
prevention or foresight, in maintaining its just rights of property 
in this State, are about drawing to a happy close. Judgments 
have been rendered in favor of the Society in all cases hitherto 
carried into Court. Hence if we consider the course, which has 
been pursued, and the nature of the cases presented for adjudica- 
tion, there would seem to remain no debatable questions. 

Sometime last spring, the General Agents directed their Attor- 
ney to bring suits in all cases where towns or individuals refused 
to surrender the lands of the Society. But being unable to pro- 
cure the necessary information concerning the situation of the 
lands in season for the May Terra of the Court, the Attorney 
states that no suits have yet been commenced. Some surrendries 
have been obtained, and some leases effected since the last report; 
though the Committee are not able to say to what extent. There 
is reason to expect, that the business will now be pushed with all 
convenient dispatch ; more especially, if the Agents shall be suc- 
cesful in obtaining the aid, which they hope, of the gentlemen 
who have been nominated and recommended to the Venerable 
Society to be added to the present body of Agents. The united 
wishes of the Agents, and of the Convention on this point have 
been carried towards effect, so far as depended on measures to be 
taken here. 

The following w^ere the persons nominated and recommended 
by the Convention, with the concurrence of the Agents : to wit : 
Hon. Jonathan H. Hnbbard, Hon. Dorastus Wooster, Jonathan 
Hagar, Esq. and the Rev. Carlton Chase. 

Documents, supposed to be sufficient to sustain these nomina- 
tions — also to obtain some advantageous and necessary modifica- 
tions of the original Power of Attorney, were about one year 
since prepared by the Prudential Committee in connection with 
the Agents. Early in October, these in a completed state, were 
put into the hands of George Atkinson, Esq. of the City of Lon- 
don, then and now in this country, and by him were transmitted 
immediately to his correspondent in London. They were duly 
received and an assurance returned, that they should be laid be- 
fore the Directors of the Society at the very first opening preseu- 



JOURJ^AL-1831. 365 

ted by their forms of business. And Mr. Atkinson has no doubt, 
that an answer will be obtained and returned as soon as those 
forms will possibly admit. It is indeed expected daily. 

Respecting the state of the Treasury and the Treasurer's books, 
and the income of lands already secured and leased, the Commit- 
tee are not prepared to make statements. If an apology is needed, 
it may be found in the discouraging difficulties, which have here- 
tofore lain in the way of this part of the duty assigned them by 
the Convention — added to the consideration of their residing at a 
great distance from the seat of the Agency business. 

CARLTON CHASE, for the Committee. 

The following gentlemen were appointed the Prudential 
Committee for the year ensuing : Eev. Carlton Chase, Ed- 
ward R. Campbell, Rev. Joel Clap, John A. Pratt. 

On motion, proceeded to the election of the Standing 
Committee for the present year, when the following gentle- 
men were chosen : Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Sylvester Nash, Rev. Silas A. 
Crane. 

The Committee appointed by the last Convention to 
examine the Canons of the Church, and report whether 
any, and if any what further Canons are necessary to be 
adopted by this Convention, submitted a report, which was 
read and ordered to lie on the table. 

The business of the Convention was then suspended for 
the purpose of attending Divine Service, to be resumed 
immediately after Divine Service, in St. James' Church. 

St. James' Church was then consecrated by the Right 
Rev. Bishop Griswold. 

Morning Prayer was read by Rev. Mr. Ballard, and the 
Sermon delivered by the Right Rev. Bishop. After which 
the business of the Convention was resumed, and adjourned 
to meet in the Vestry Room of St. James' Church, at two 
o'clock, p. M. 



366 JOURXAL-1831. 

Two o'clock, p. M. 

The Convention met according to adjournment, and 
adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Evening Prayer v^^as read by Rev. Mr. Mitchell, and a 
Sermon delivered by the Right Rev. Bishop. After which 
the Convention met according to adjournment. 

Th.e following Report of the Standing Committee was 
presented and read : 

At a regular meeting at which all the members were present, 
holden at Windsor, on the 26th day of May, 1830, Rev, A. Bron- 
son was appointed President, and Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary. 

On the 27th day of May, present as on the day previous, the 
requisite testimonials in favor of Rev. William Horton, Deacon, 
recommending him to the Bishop, for Priest's Orders were executed 

At a regular meeting holden at Middlebury, on the Ttli day of 
July, 1830, Present, Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. 
Carlton Chase, Rev. Sylvester Nash, the requisite testimonial in 
favOr of the consecration of the Rev. William Murray Stone, 
Bishop elect of the Diocese of Maryland, were duly executed. 

At a regular meeting holden at Perkinsville in Weathersfield, 
on the 1st day of November, 1830, Present, Rev. Abraham Bron- 
son, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. Carlton Chase, the requisite testimonial 
in favor of the consecration of the Rev. Benjamin Tredwell Onder- 
donk, Bishop elect of the Diocese of New- York, was duly executed. 

On the 23d day of August, 1831, the requisite testimonial in 
favor of Rev. Silas A. Crane, Deacon, recommending him to the 
Bishop, for Priest's Orders, was executed. 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

The Committtee to whom was referred the communication 
from the Secretary of the Convention of Massachusetts, 
submitted the following resolutions, which were unanimously 
adopted : 

Resolved, That this Convention fully concur with the 
Convention of Massachusetts, in the conviction, that it is 
expedient, and desirable, that, as soon as circumstances 
permit, arrangements be made for dividing the Eastern Dio- 
cese into smaller Episcopal jurisdictions. 



J0VRJfAL-18Sl. 367 

Kesolved, also, That this Convention cannot contemplate 
without the most sensible pain, any measures, whose effect 
may be to deprive the Church in Vermont, of the Episcopal 
services of her present excellent and greatly beloved Bishop, 
— and that nothing would induce this Convention to consent 
to such measures but a belief that the prosperity of the 
Churches requires them. 

On motion by Kev. Mr. Clap, the report of the Com- 
mittee ujMn the Canons was taken up, whereupon the fol- 
lowing Canons as reported by said Committee were adopted: 

CANON III. 

OF THE TRIAL OF PERSONS REPELLED FROM THE COMMUNION. 

In case any member of this Church, repelled from the 
Holy, Communion, shall make complaint to the Bishop, 
and demand a trial according to the third Canon of the 
General Convention of 1817, the Bishop with two presbyters 
of this Diocese shall proceed with all reasonable dispatch 
to investigate the facts, in the parish where the complaining 
party resides; thirty days notice being given to said party 
and also to the repelling Minister. And the Bishop with 
advice of his presbyters shall affirm or reverse the repulsion, 
or proceed to severer measures, even to the excommunica- 
tion of the party tried, as in their judgment the facts shall 
require. Or the Bishop may direct any three presbyters of 
the Diocese to hold such investigation, who shall report the 
facts to him, with their opinion of the award which the 
facts require. And the Bishop, if he approve, shall pro- 
nounce judgment accordingly. 

CANON IV. 

CONCERNING COUNCILS IN CASE OF DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MINISTERS 
AND TUEIR CONGREGATIONS. 

It is hereby ordered that every Council called by the 
Bishop, or Convention or Standing Committee, for the set- 
tlement of differences between ministers and their congre- 
gations, shall consist of the Bishop and at least three pres- 



368 JOUBJfAL-1831. 

byters, or, in the absence of the Bishop, of at least five 
presbyters, who shall make report to the Bishop. And in 
all cases the parties concerned shall have twelve days notice 
of the time and place of holding the Council. (See Canon 
32, of General Convention.) 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Crane, Resolved, That the 
Secretary of this Convention be, and hereby is, directed to 
make application to the next Diocesan Convention and to 
the several State Conventions in the Eastern Diocese for 
permission to erect this State into a separate Diocese as 
oon as such separation can regularly be effected. 

The following Parochial Reports were presented and read: 
TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET. 

DANIEL FITCH, SENIOR WARDEN. 

Communicants, 26 ; Confirmations, 3. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY. 

MOORE BINGHAM, RECTOR. 

Communicants, 40 — added 9 ; Baptisms, (adults 8, infants 6) — 
14 ; Marriage, 1 ; Funerals, 2 ; Confirmations, 29 ; a part of 
which number is of persons belonging to the parish of St. John's, 
in Rutland. Sunday Scholars, 25. 

The new Church is in progress, and will probably be finished 
in six or eight weeks. 

The associations in the parish are a Bible, Prayer Book, Tract, 
Sunday School and Missionary Associations ; also a Female Circle 
of Industry, for charitable purposes. 

The circumstances and prospects of the parish may gratefully 
be represented as prosperous. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, RUTLAND. 

MOORE BINGHAM, VISITING MINISTER. 

Communicants, the number not known, but probably 10 or 12. 

This parish has been a long time destitute of a Clergyman ; 

but it is thought that they would have no difficulty in employing 



JOUBJfAL-1831. 369 

a Clergyman one half of the time, and joined with Castletou or 
some other town might doubtless support one for the whole time. 
There are at this time in it several candidates for Baptism, 
Confirmation and the Lord's Sapper ; and the subscriber has no 
doubt that, with some reasonable share of assistance, this parish 
might soon be revived and greatly enlarged. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS. 

DAVID LEWIS, JOHN C. HOPSON, WARDENS. 

Communicants, 20 ; Baptisms, 3 ; Confirmations, 3. 

This parish at present is under the charge of Rev. Mr. Bennet, 
in connection with the Church in Granville ; yet we hold our 
parish meeting separately, and have our share of preaching, which 
at present amounts to one fourth of the time. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH ARLINGTON. 

W. S. PERKINS, MINISTER. 

Baptisms 18, 10 adults; Marriages 3; Deaths 3; Communi- 
cants 112; (added 29) Confirmed 37. 

The Minister of this parish can say with thankfulness to the 
Giver of all good that it has never been in a more interesting con- 
dition either temporally, or spiritually, than it is at present. The 
Church, the corner stone of which was laid by our Bishop eigh- 
teen months ago, is now completed and consecrated. In every 
respect it fully satisfies the feelings of its builders. Its cost, ex- 
clusive of labor done by the parishioners themselves, of which no 
account has been taken, is estimated at ten thousand dollars, the 
whole of which is paid by the parish. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults), 13; Marriages, 2; Funerals, 4; Communi- 
ants, 54. 

The Divine goodness has been unusually manifested in the ad- 
vancement of piety in this parish for a few months past. There 
have been considerable additions to the Communion ; and the 
work of grace appears to be still going on among the people. 



370 JO TJBKAL-1 831. 

Seventeen persons have recently been confirmed in this Church, 
and seven belonging here have been confirmed to-day in Arlington. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

S. A. CRANE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — infants 2, adults 3; Communicants (added 8), pres- 
ent number 44; Confirmations, 9; Marriages, 8; Funerals, 10; 
Sunday School 60. Collection on Easter Sunday, for the Diocesan 
Missionary fund, $10.50. One Bible, and one Missionary Society. 
This report embraces only a period of about ten months, the time 
of the present Rector's connexion with the Society. During this 
period the Sunday School has been organized; and a library of 
one hundred and thirty volumes collected. This Church has bad 
many difficiilties to encounter ; but it is hoped they are now prin- 
cipally removed. Apparently it is in a prosperous state, and the 
congregation is increasing. With gratitude to the great Head of 
the Church for the success that has already attended his labors, 
the Rector hopes that he shall continue to be prospered in his ex- 
ertions to prompte pure and undefiled religion in this branch of 
our Zion. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

LOUIS MC DONALD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — infants 4, adults 3 ; Confirmed, 5 ; Marriages, 6 ; 
Funerals 1 1 ; Communicants 70. 

The state of this parish is more prosperous than at the meeting 
of the last Convention, 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

SYLVESTER NASH, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adults 10, infants 7 ; Confirmations, 24; Funerals, 3 ; 
Marriages, 5 ; Communicants, 50. ' 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD, AND GRACE 
CHURCH, SHELDON. 

The prospects of these parishes have never at any former 
period been more encouraging, than within the year past. In 
Trinity Church there have been 19 Baptisms, 9 Funerals. Sunday 



JOUBKAL-1831. 371 

School Scholars, 75 ; Communicants, 90. Additions to the number 
of communicants, 16. In Grace Church Sheldon, there have been 
85 Baptisms, 3 Funerals, Sunday School Scholars, 40. Commu- 
nicants, 78; additions, 25. During the year, between the services 
on the Sabbath, a Bible class has been attended, which has been 
much blest, nearly every member of which is hopefully pious. 
The ladies of these parishes by the payment of thirty dollars have 
constituted their pastor a life member of the Domestic and For- 
eign Missionary Society. Auxiliary to this society. Associations 
have been formed in both parishes, with which most of the chil- 
dren, as well as communicants, are connected. The increase and 
prosperity of the parishes is unquestionably identified with the 
increase of a missionary spirit. If this spirit is cherished, the par- 
ishes will grow and prosper, whatever obstacle may oppose. But 
if the claims of domestic and foreign missions are disregarded, 
they will inevitably languish and die. This point has been re- 
peatedly urged upon the attention of the parishes as one of vital 
importance. Within a little more than one year, one hundred 
and seventy-five Prayer Books have been disposed of. The cir- 
culation of tracts published by the Protestant Episcopal press, 
such as the McEllen Family, &c. has, by the blessing of God, had 
a wonderful effect in dissipating prejudices and in preparing the 
minds of the people for a warm and hearty reception of the Prayer 
Book. In the month of April last, the Rev. Mr. Hard resigned 
the charge of these parishes, and accepted an invitation to take 
charge of Trinity Church, Plattsburgh, N. Y. Since that time 
they have been destitute, excepting a i^v^ Sabbaths which have 
been occupied by the Rev. Aaron Humphrey. The leading mem- 
bers have with commendable zeal kept up the regular services of 
the church, and had a sermon read, which has in a good degree 
kept them together in the unity of the spirit and in the bond of 
peace. The Rev. Mr. Hard preached two Sabbaths in the winter 
in the town of Highgate, adjoining Sheldon. In that town the 
foundation of a church edifice was laid in the Spring, and by an- 
other season will be ready for consecration. This has been com- 
menced by a few liberal, benevolent, warm hearted souls, who love 
the Church, " the pillar and ground of the truth," and ardently 
desire its prosperity. 



372 J0URJ^AL~1831. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 18, infants 16) — 34 ; Funerals, 4 ; Marriages, 1; 
Sunday Scholars, 40 ; Confirmed, 30 ; Communicants (added 40, 
removed and died 5) — 95. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 9, infants 4) — 13 ; Funeral, 1 ; Sunday Schol- 
ars, 50 ; Confirmed, 18 ; Communicants (added 25) — 80. 

These churches have recently experienced a season of refresh- 
ing from the presence of the Lord. 

CHRIST'S CHURCH, ENOSBURGH. 

RICHARD PECK, MINISTER. 

Baptisms, 4; Confirmed, 4 ; Communicants, (added 8, suspend- 
ed 1,)— 11. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JAMES SABINE, RECTOR. 

Present number of Communicants (removed to other place s 
7, by death 4, added this year 6) — 83; Baptisms (adults 4, infanta 
5) 9 ; Sunday School, 26 ; Bible Class, 16 ; Confirmed, 23. 

The Missionary Society stands as last year. 

The residence of the present Minister has been only from last 
October, his institution as Rector took place on the late visitation 
of the Bishop, eleventh Sunday after Trinity, August 14th. The 
state of the parish is somewhat promising ; and with diligent la- 
bor and the Divine Blessing it is hoped the Church will continue 
to hold on her way. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms — adults 3, infants 4 ; Marriage, 1 ; Communicants, 26. 

The undersigned removed to this parish soon after the last 

meeting of this Convention, in 1830, since which time his services 



JOVRKAL-1831. 373 

have been exclusively devoted to the same. Although there has 
not been by any means that increase of spiritual religion which is 
ardently desired, yet, through the goodness of God, the congre- 
gation has been gradually increasing, and there seems to be 
indications of increasing seriousness, which we earnestly pray may 
result in a general exciteiiient of religious feeling. Our Sunday 
School Library has been recently enlarged, and the condition of 
the School upon the whole was never more prosperous. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

W. HORTON, OFFICIATING MINI&TER. 

Communicants, 60 ; Baptisms, 8 ; Confirmations, 16 ; Sunday 
Scholars, 62 ; Funerals, 3. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

CARLTON CnASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (7 adults, 5 children) — 12; Marriages, 4; Deaths, 4; 
Communicants, 45 ; Sunday Scholars, 75 ; Sunday School Library, 
300 volumes ; Parish Library, 180 volumes. 

The Rector regrets the necessity of reporting a diminished list 
of Communicants. The pleasure of adding twelve new names 
has not been sufficient to counterbalance the pain of losing, by 
death and changes of residence, a still greater number. Yet the 
bread is on the waters somewhere, and will be found. The con- 
gregation has never been so large as it is now. It has indeed 
outoTOwn our edifice,— rinsomuch that measures are in contempla- 
tion for making an addition to it ; which will probably be effected 
during the next season. The weekly Bible Class, reported in 
former years, continues to be well attended. The Rector is dis- 
posed to place it among his most interesting and successful means 
of usefulness. As respects benevolent objects abroad, there has 
been contributed by the " Ladies' Circle of Industry" for the 
general purposes of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, 
the sum of one hundred dollars ; for the Greek Mission, by gen- 
eral collection, forty-three dollars; for the Diocesan fund, by 
Easter collection, fourteen dollars ; in all, one hundred and fifty- 
seven dollars. 



374 JO URMAL-1 831. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD. 

SAMUEL B. SHAW, LATE RECTOR. 

In Christ Church, Guilford, have been baptized, during the 
last year, 6 infants and 1 adult. Making allowance for additions, 
deaths and removals, I find 60 persons now members of the com- 
munion. Eleven couples have been married, and 24 persons have 
been buried, of whom 6 were adults. It may not be improper to 
mention, that the unusual number of deaths reported was occa- 
sioned by the prevalence of the canker rash, and that many of 
the most interesting scholars in our Sunday Schools fell victims 
to this desolating scourge. Present number of families attending 
church, between 80 and 90. There are not far from 80 children 
in the Sunday Schools, and a respectable class for instruction in 
tbe Scriptures has always met during the Summer. Since the 
last Convention, the Church in the East village has been re- 
painted, and is now in thorough repair. 

The subscriber, having been called in the providence of God to 
another field of labor, and circumstances having induced him to 
accept the invitation, feels it his duty, after a connexion of almost 
nine years with the people of his late charge, to bear testimony 
to their uniform kindness and attention to himself and family ; and 
to their diligent and regular use of the means of grace afforded 
them in the Church of Christ. May the Lord be with them, and 
bless them —may he direct them to another Shepherd, who will 
lead them to green pastures, even in the way of life everlasting. 

Adjourned until half past 7 o'clock, to-morrow moruirig. 

Thursday, Sept. 1, 1831. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Clergy 
of this State, and the Wardens of destitute Churches be 
requested to persevere in presenting to their people the 
subject of the Contingent Fund, and in soliciting annual 
contributions to it. 

On motion by Hon. Dorastus Wooster, Resolved, That 
the next annual meeting of this Convention be held in St. 
Stephen's Church, Middlebury. 



JOURJfAL-1831. 375 

Rev. William Horton was appointed to preach before the 
next Convention, and Rev. Sylvester Nash, his substitute. 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund presented the 
following report, which was read and accepted : 

Joel Clap, Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, 

To THE Convention, Dr. 
To balance on hand, as per last report, after deducting 

interest, as there charged, $81.13 

To contribution from Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . 6.50 
" Zion Church, Manchester, .... 2.00 

« Trinity Church, Pawlet, 75 

'< St. Paul's Church, Wells, .... 1.00 

$9138 
Per Contra, Cr. 

By amount paid for printing Journal of 1830, .... $12.00 

Balance on hand this day, $79.38 

JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 
September 1, 1831. 

On motion by Hon. D. Wooster, Resolved, That the 
Prudential Committee be and they are hereby directed to 
prosecute the measures heretofore entrusted to their man- 
agement in relation to the agency of the "Society's Land in 
this State." 

The following gentlemen were appointed Delegates to the 
General Convention ; Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Carlton 
Chase, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. Sylvester Nash, of the Clergy. 
Hon. Dudley Chase, George Cleaveland, Alexander Fleming, 
Esqrs. and Mr. Cyrel Fuller, of the Laity. 

On motion by Hon. D. Wooster, Resolved, That the 
Secretary be directed to publish six hundred copies of the 
Journal of this Convention at the expense of the Contingent 
Fund. 

Adjourned for the purpose of attending Divine Service. 
Morning Prayer was read by Rev. Mr. Chase, Sermon by the 



376 JOTJBJ^AL-1831. 

Eight Kev. Bishop. Rev. WilHam S. Perkins, Deacon, was 
ordained Priest. After which, the Holy Communion was 
administered by the Bishop, assisted by Rev, Anson B. Hard. 
The Convention then met according to adjournment, and 
adjourned, without day. 
A true Record. 

Attest 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



The following passages from the Address of Bishop Griswold 
to the Annual Convention of the Eastern Diocese held in St. Peter's 
Church, Salem, Mass., Sept. 28, 1831, are here appropriate. They 
are copied from the printed Journal of that Convention. 

" First of all, are we bonnd to unite our hearts in thanks and 
praise to the Father of mercies, for many and great blessings vouch- 
safed during this our last constitutional year. We have been 
preserved from desolating judgments, and calamitous events ; and 
generally it has been in our parishes, a season of health. Some 
{&\y! of our brethren, and much esteemed friends of the laity, it 
has pleased the Lord to remove by death ; but, however 
deeply we must lament their loss, a smaller number we conld not 
in reason have expected. Of our Clergy, through the Lord's good- 
ness, none have died. Our loss from the Diocese has indeed been 
great and severe : several of our most useful parish ministers have 
removed to other parts ; and at no former period have our Churches 
suffered more than they now do, from the want of faithful laborers : 
and yet with thankfulness may we add, that at no other period, 
in all human appearance, have the labors of those who continue with 
us been more generally blest. Our Churches have increased, not 
in numbers only, but we have good reason to believe, in piety and 
religious zeal ; and never had we more reason to thank God and 
take courage." 

" My own strength, through the Divine blessing, has been so con- 
tinued, that my labours have not been diminished — in no year have 
they been more abundant. The year preceding this last, I visited 
all our Churches but six. In this which now expires, about the 
same number only have been visited; and these few, with two or 
three exceptions, such as did not particularly need my services. 



JO TJEKAL-l 831. 377 

Some have been visited twice, and I have done in that way as 
much as to visit all once. In the course of the year I preached 
about two hundred times, and about thirty times administered the 
Lord's Supper. A particular account of all my official labors, 
would be too great a tax upon your patience. A narrative of my 
last journey, chiefly in Vermont, has recently been published. It 
is very much my duty, and I trust sincerely my desire, while it 
shall please the Lord to prolong my life and give me strength to 
do what little shall be in my power, to promote the interest and 
increase of the Churches under our pastoral care. Those in 
Maine, and all on the west side of the Connecticut River have 
been visited once, and some few of them twice. In October, soon 
after the meeting of our last Convention, I made a journey in the 
western part of the Diocese, when the Rev. Mr. Horton was or- 
dained Priest at Windsor, and appointed Pastor of the Church 
there ; and it happily prospers under his ministry. I have 
thought it my duty generally to ordain Presbyters in the parishes 
where they are permanently to officiate ; believing it for reasons 
which must be obvious to all, to be of essential benefit. For this 
important purpose I have been ready to go, at any time, and to 
any part of the Diocese. Of all men, a Bishop should be the least 
disposed to shrink from any labour, which will promote religion, 
and benefit the Church. No one is obliged to accept an office of 
such high responsibility : if we do accept it, we must, as our Lord 
commands, he the servants of alV 

" In New-Hampshire there has been some increase. The 
Churches in Hopkinton and Holderness are among the few which 
I have not visited. Those "of Cornish, Claremont, Charlestown 
and Drewsville, I have visited twice ; as also those of Windsor 
and Bellows Falls, in Vermont. Some unpleasant occurrences 
induced the Rev. Mr. Blackaller to resign the charge of the small 
parish in Somersworth, at the Great Falls." 

" On the 19th of April last, the Rev. Mr. Doane was instituted 
Rector of Trinity Church in Boston. The Rev. Mr. Shaw has 
resigned the charge of the Church in Guilford in Vermont, and 
become the Pastor of St. Luke's Church in Lanesborough of this 
State." 

" In Vermont, though they are suffering the most from the 
want of clergymen, there is the most cause of thankfulness to 



378 JOURKAL-1831. 

God : especially for the great numljers recently awakened to 
righteousness, and the very evident increase of" piety throughout 
the State. In my late journey thvough it, / confirmed almost 
three hundred, and the greater part of them, so far as man can 
judge, had been recently renewed in the spirit of their mind. 
With the exception of Shelburne and Guilford the Churches are 
all in a thriving state. In the latter place, they are of course 
much discouraged, in consequence of Mr. Shaw's leaving them, 
and it is very necessary that some one should supply the place." 

" The Rev. Mr. Hard has some months since left the parishes of 
Sheldon and Fairfield, where his labours were very much blessed, 
and is dismissed from this Diocese. On the 14th of the last 
month, the Rev. Mr. Sabine was instituted into the Church in 
Bethel. The Rev. Richard Peck has returned from Connecticut 
to his former station, and is now laboring with success in Berk- 
shire and Montgomery, and occasionally at Enosburgh. Fifty- 
three were confirmed in his parishes. In Highgate, in the north- 
west corner of the State, they -are building a Church : the one 
building in Montgomery, it is expected will soon be finished. In 
Cambridge, where I preached as I journeyed through it, by suita- 
ble exertions, a parish might be gathered. Two pious, faithful 
laborers are now much wanted in that part of the vineyard." 

"The Rev. Mr. Oieaveland who is in ill health, I left at Fairfield, 
where it is hoped he may be able to perform service." 

" In Burlington, a very respectable number of people have 
lately formed an Episcopal parish, and the Rev. Dr. Chapman is, 
with much success, officiating with them. They are about com- 
mencing the building of a Church, and the prospects there are 
highly encouraging. On the 26th of August, the Rev. Silais A. 
Crane, Deacon, was, at Middlebury, ordained Priest and Rector of 
that Church, where he is soon to be instituted." 

" In Poultney the parish has much increased, and the members 
of it are making very great and liberal exertions to build a 
Church, which is already raised and covered. In Pawlet and 
Wells it is thought parishes will soon be formed. On the 31st, 
the adjourned Convention of Vermont met at Arlington, when 
their new and beautiful Church was dedicated to God's holy wor- 
ship ; in which solemnity we were assisted by several of our breth- 



JOURJfAL-1831. 379 

ren from other States. It is called St. James' Church, and is 
built of stone, in excellent taste ; and, though the parish is small, 
at the expense, it was said, of not less than ten thousand dollars; 
more than three thousand of which, I was informed, has been 
very freely contributed by one g(?ntleman. The next day, the 
Rev. Mr. Perkins, their minister, was ordained Priest. In all the 
services, the congregations were very large." 

" In Bennington are good prospects : a clergyman is much 
needed there, and much desired. Also in a place called Perkins- 
villa, where for the first time I officiated, and where the Rev. Mr. 
Ballard has for some time officiated, some part of his time, we 
may hope there will soon be a parish. But what in my late tour 
through that State was most pleasing, and is most encouraging, 
was the ardent, religious feeling which almost every Avhere pre- 
vailed, beyond what I have before so generally witnessed." 

"In journeying through the Diocese, and in Vermont especial- 
ly, my attention has been frequently called to the wonderful effects 
of Temperance Societies : the good already effected seems almost 
incredible ; and daily on our knees should we thank God for the 
success He has given to their labors. It is a striking proof of 
what great good may be effected by united and persevering effort." 

" In the past year the whole number of those confirmed, at 47 
times, is 530. Candidates admitted are John A. Vaughn, 
Golden Dearth, William P. Page, James W. Cook, Daniel Leach, 
Erastus D'Wolf, William Friend, and Jonathan L. Woart. The 
testimonials of the last three named, were signed earlier, but were 
not given me till this last year. The testimonials of Charles Fay, 
George Burgess and Lucius M. Purdy are also signed, but have 
not yet been delivered to me. Justice to the candidates requires 
that in such cases the record of their being received should be of 
the same date as the testimonials, signed by the Standing Com- 
mittee. Mr. Woart has been dismissed to Virginia, and there 
recently ordained. The whole number of Candidates, including 
these last named, is eighteen. The Rev. Messrs. Joseph H. Price, 
William Horton, George F. Haskins, Benjamin Hale, Silas A. 
Crane, and William S. Perkins, Deacons, have been ordained 
Priests ; and two only, Matthias Munroe and John Batchelder, 
have been ordained Deacons. The latter of these had been a 



380 JOVBKAL-1832. 

minister in another denomination, and of course was not recorded 
as a candidate. The Rev. Messrs. Tappan, Withington, Fuller, 
Hard and Colton, have been at their own request, dismissed from 
this Diocese. The Rev. Mr. Humphry and the Rev. A. Potter 
have also left us." 

" What has been done by several of our state Conventions, 
respecting the division of this Diocese, is no doubt known to you : 
it is a subject which shoxild be considered with deep deliberation 
and earnest prayer. Nothing has occurred to change the views 
which formerly, and more than once, I have publicly expressed 
on this subject. It is a subject which must soon be considered, 
and acted on, and probably no time will be more favorable for its 
consideration than the present. Such, however, is my confidence 
in the wisdom of this Convention, that I shall cheerfully acqui- 
esce in whatever shall be your decision. I am wholly devoted to 
our beloved Church, and what labors it shall please the Lord, in 
His merciful goodness, still to enable me to perform, are at your 
disposal." 



1832. 

LIST OF THE CLERGY OF THE DIOCESE OF VERMONT, 
AND OF THE LAY DELEGATES WHO ATTENDED THE 
CONVENTION OF 1832. 

CLERGY. 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, 
Rector of Zion Church, Manchester. 

Rev. George T. Chapman, 
Rector of St. Paul's Church, Burlington. 

Rev. Carlton Chase, 
Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls. 

Rev. Joel Clap, 
Rector of St. James' Church, Woodstock. 



JO TJBNAL~1 832. 38 1 

Rev. Silas A. Crane, 
Rector of St. Stephen's Church, Middlebury. 

Rev. Anson B. Hard, 
Rector of Grace Church, Sheldon. 

Rev. John A. Hicks, 
Rector of Trinity Church, Rutland. 

Rev. William Horton, 
Rector of St. Paul's Church, Windsor. 

Rev. Louis McDonald, 
Rector of Trinity Church, Shelburne. 

Rev. Sylvester Nash, 
Rector of Union Church, St. Albans. 

Rev. Richard Peck, 
Rector of Calvary Church, Berkshire, and Union Church, 
Montgomery. 

Rev. William S. Perkins, 
Rector of St. James' Church, Arlington. 

Rev. James Sabine, 
Rector of Christ Church, Bethel. 

LAY DELEGATES. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON: 
Sylvester Deming, Simeon Cole, 

Noble Hard, Cyrus B. Hills, 

John B. Lathrop, 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER: 
Truman Purdy, Hiram French, 

Jesse Hard. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS: 
Calif Monroe. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET : 
Daniel Fitch, James Cook, 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 
Timothy Marshall, Aaron Lewis. 



382 JO URMAL-1 832- 

TRINITY CHURCH, RUTLAND: 
Porter Howe, Ldcius M. Pcrdy. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY : 
Joel Doolittle, George Cleateland, 

Calvin C. Waller. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, VERGENNES: 
Francis Bradbury. 

ST PAUL'S CHURCH, BURLINGTON: 
Timothy Follett, Andrew Thompson, 

Justus Burdick. 

TRINITY CHURCH, MILTON : 
Samuel R. Crane, Warren Hoxis. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS: 
John Richardson, Benjamin Richardson. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 
Isaac J. Potter. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD : 
Alfred Wheeler, Lyman Hawley, 

Jeptha Bradley. 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE : 
David Coburn. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 
John T. Sabine. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR : 
Jessk Lull, Simeon Ide. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, PERKINSVILLE : 
Thomas Prentiss. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS: 

John Atkinson, Artemas Robbins, 

M. S. Buckland. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD : 
Dana Hyde, Asabel Dickenson. 



JOURJfAL-1832. 383 



JOURNAL OF 1832. 



Wednesday, May 30, 1832. 

This being the day appointed by the Constitution, for the 
annual meeting of the Convention of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church in Vermont, a number of the Clergy, and Lay 
Delegates from several Parishes, assembled in St. Stephen's 
Church, Middlebury, at 9 o'clock, a. m. 

The Convention was organized by the appointment of 
Rev. Abraham Bronson, President, pro tem. and Rev. Joel 
Clap, Secretary, pro tem. 

Present : 

Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Church, if awc/^es^er. 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows 

Falls. 
Rev. Joel Clap, Rector of St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
Rev. Silas A. Crane, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, 

Middlebury. 
Rev. Anson B. Hard, Rector of Grace Church, Sheldon. 
Rev. John A. Hicks, Rector of Trinity Church, Rutland. 
Rev. William Horton, Rector of St. Paul's Church, 

Windsor. 
Rev. Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelburn. 
Rev, Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, St. Albans. 
Rev. Richard Peck, Rector of Calvary Church, Berkshire, 

and Union Church, Montgomery. 
Rev. William S. Perkins, Rector of St. James' Church, 

Arlington. 
Rev. James Sabine, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel. 



384 JOUBJfAL-1832. 

The following gentlemen appeared, presented their Cre- 
dentials, and took their seats as Lay Delegates. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON : 

Sylvester Deming, Simeon Cole, 

Noble Haed. Cyrus B. Hills, 

John B. Lathrop. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS : 

^ Calif Monroe. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET: 

Daniel Fitch, James Cook. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY: 

Timothy Marshall, Aaron Lewis. 

TRINITY CHURCH, RUTLAND: 

Porter Howe, Lucius M. Purdy. 

st. stephen's church, middlebury: 
George Cleaveland, Calvin C. Waller. 

UNION CHI>RCH, ST. ALBANS: 

John Richardson, Benjamin Richardson. 

GRACE CHURCH, SHELDON: 

Isaac J. Potter, 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD: 

Alfred Wheeler, Lyman Hawley, 

Jeptha Bradley. 

calvary CHURCH, BERKSHIRE: 

David Cobourn. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL: 

John T. Sabine. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR: 

Jesse Lull, Simeon Ide. 

IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS : 

John Atkinson. 

CHRIST CHURCH, GUILFORD : 

Dana Hyde. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, PERKINSVILLE : 

Thomas Prentiss, 



JOVRKAL-1832. 3S5 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Presi- 
dent be, and he hereby is, requested to invite Clergymen of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, and candidates for Holy 
Orders in the same, who may be in town during the session 
of this Convention, to honorary scats in the same. 

Rev. Abraham Bronson was chosen President, and Rev. 
Joel Clap, Secretary. 

The following gentlemen were elected the Standing 
Committee : Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. 
Silas A. Crane, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Sylvester Nash. 

The business of the Convention was suspended for the 
purpose of attending Divine Service. 

Morning Prayers were read by Rev. James Sabine ; the 
Sermon preached by Rev. William Horton. 

The Holy Communion was administered by the Rev. 
President, assisted by Rev. Anson B. Hard ; after which 
the business of the Convention was resumed. 

Rev. George T. Chapman, Rector of St. Paul's Church. 
Burlington, appeared and took his seat. 

The following Lay Delegates appeared, presented their 
Credentials, and took their seats : Truman Purdy, Hiram 
French, and Jesse Hard, from Zion Church, Manchester. 
Artemas Robbins, from Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls. 

Convention adjourned until 3 o'clock, this afternoon. 

Wednesday, 3 o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

The following Lay Delegates appeared, presented their 
Credentials, and took their seats : Francis Bradbury, from 
St. Paul's Church, Vergennes ; M. S. Buckland, from Im- 
manuel Church, Bellows Falls ; Ashbel Dickinson, from 
Christ Church, Guilford. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Con- 
vention do now proceed to the consideration of the separation 
of this State from the Eastern Diocese : 



386 JO VRKAL-1 832. 

Whereupon, the Secretary having informed the Conven- 
tion that, in compliance with the Resolution of the last 
Convention, upon this subject, he had applied in behalf of 
the Churches in this State, to the Diocesan and the several 
State Conventions within the Eastern Diocese for permission 
to withdraw from the said Eastern Diocese, presented the 
following documents : 

AN EXTKACT FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE LAST CONVENTION 
OF THE EASTERN DIOCESE. 

The report of the Committee on the division of the Eastern 
Diocese was made, in the words following, and unanimously 
adopted : 

" The Committee to whom was referred so much of the Bishop's 
address as relates to the division of the Eastern Diocese, together 
with the communication from Vermont, having taken the impor- 
tant subject intrusted to them, into the most serious deliberation, 
with diligent inquiry as to the proceedings relative to the same 
subject, in the several States composing the Eastern Diocese, re- 
spectfully report the following Preamble and Resolution. 

Whereas, it appears to this Convention, that the Church in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts is desirous to be erected into a 
diocese by itself, retaining Bishop Griswold as its Diocesan ; and 
Whereas, the Church in the State of Vermont has communicated 
to this Convention its desire to apply to the several States, com- 
posing the Eastern Diocese, for permission to withdraw according 
to the provision of the 9th Article of the Constitution : there- 
fore, 

Resolved, That in the judgment of this Conve^ntion, the desire 

of Massachusetts is reasonable, and ought, as soon as circumstances 
allow, to be granted : and this Convention, while it approves the 
course intended by Vermont, expressly recommends to the several 
States composing the Eastern Diocese, with the exception of 
Massachusetts, to withdraw, as soon as may be convenient, from 
this Convention, and to erect themselves into distinct Dioceses." 

Cambridge, Nov. 2, 1831. 
Rev. and Dear Sir ; — At a Special Convention of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church in Massachusetts, holden this day at 



JOVEKAL-183^. 387 

Trinity Church, Boston, the following resolution was passed unan- 
imously, and is now communicated to you, in obedience to the 
direction of said Convention : 

" The Convention having been certified of the anxious desire of 
the State of Vermont, to witlidraw from the Eastern Diocese, and 
to erect itself into a separate Diocese as soon as may be : There- 
fore, 

Resolved, That this Convention fully concur therein, provided 
the assent of the Rt. Rev. Bishop of the Eastern Diocese be had 
thereto : and this Convention, in the adoption of the above res- 
olution, the effect of which is to promote the separation of a com- 
pact, which has existed for many years, and by the Divine blessing 
been productive of much comfort and advantage, commends the 
Church in Vermont, in case such separation should be effected, 
to the blessing of God, sincerely "desiring for it all spiritual 
prosperity and peace." 

T. W. COIT, Secretary of Con. of Mass. 

To Rev. Joel Clap, Secretary of Con. of Vermont. 

A Special Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the State of Maine, was holden in St. Paul's Church, Port- 
land, Tuesday, February 7, 1832, for the consideration of the 
request of the State of Vermont, as officially communicated by 
the Rev. Joel Clap, for permission to withdraw from the Eastern 
Diocese : 

There were present. Rev. Messrs. Ten Broeck, Olney, and 
Meuncher, of the Clergy. 

Messrs. J. Merrill and M. P. Sawyer, of St. Paul's Church, 
Portland, and Mr. John Batchelder of Trinity Church, Saco. 

Rev. Petrus S. Ten Broeck was elected President. 

Prayers were offered up by Rev. Mr. Meuncher, of Saco. 
• Voted that the Rev. Benj. Hale be admitted to the sittings of 
this Convention. 

After consideration of the request communicated by the Secre- 
tary of Vermont, the following Preamble and Resolutions were 
unanimously adopted : 



388 JO VRKAL-1 832. 

Whereas the present exigencies of the Church in the State of 
Vermont seem to render it expedient that said Church should 
constitute a separate Diocese, with the view to the election of a 
Bishop; 

And whereas, the Convention of the Eastern Diocese has 
already consented to the measure, and our venerable Diocesan 
has approved the same : Therefore, 

Resolved, That the request of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
in the State of Vermont, officially communicated to this Conven- 
tion, by the Rev. Joel Clap, to withdraw from the Eastern Dio- 
cese, be cordially complied with. 

Resolved, also. That in giving our assent to the separation of 
the Church in Vermont from the Eastern Diocese, we heartily 
wish it God speed in its new course. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of this Convention be requested 
to transmit a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions, to 
the Secretary of the Convention of the Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont. 
Attest, 

SAMUEL CUTLER, Sec'y Maine Con. 

Warren, March 12, 1832. 

Rev. Mr. Clap, — Dear Sir: — At a Special Convention of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in Rhode Island, held in St. Paul's 
Church, North Providence, on the 8th inst. the following resolutions 
were adopted; — 

That this Convention having been officially infonned that the 
Churches in Vermont are desirous of withdrawing from the Eastern 
Diocese, and the Constitution of said Diocese requiring our con- 
sent, it is therefore , 

Resolved, That we consent to their withdrawal. 

Resolved, That the Secretary of this Convention communicate 
the same to the Secretary of the Convention of the Church of 
Vermont. 

Yours, respectfully, 

GEO. W. HATHAWAY. 



JOURJfAL-1832. 389 

At a Special Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Churches 
of the State of New- Hampshire, holden at St. John's Church, iu 
Portsmouth, on Saturda}', the 21st day of April, in the year of 
onr Lord, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, at eleven 
of the clock in the forenoon, to act on the following business to 
wit : — 

1. To choose a President to govern the said Convention, 

2. To take into consideration the application of the Episcopal 
Churches iu Vermont to the Convention of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Churches of New-Hampshire, for permission to withdraw 
their connexion from the Eastern Diocese, and for the State of 
Vermont to be erected into a separate Diocese, 

On motion of Mr. Cutts, Voted, That, whereas, the Convention 
of the Protestant Episcopal Churches in the State of Vermont, 
have applied to the Conventions of the several States constituting 
the Eastern Diocese, for permission to withdraw their connexion 
from the said Diocese, with a view that the State of Vermont may 
be erected into a separate Diocese, this Convention do now con- 
sent that the several Protestant Episcopal Churches in the State 
of Vermont may, at their pleasure, for the purpose aforesaid, with- 
draw their connexion from the Eastern Diocese. 

CHARLES BURROUGHS, President. 

Lory Odel, Secretary, pro tem. 

To THE Convention of the Protestant 

Episcopal Churcu in the Diocese of Vermont : 

Whereas, by mutual consent and permission of the Convention 
of the Eastern Diocese, and of the Conventions of the several 
States which constitute or compose the said Eastern Diocese, it 
has, on my recommendation, and with my approval, been permit- 
ted and agreed, that the Protestant Episcopal Church in the State 
of Vermont, should be separated from the said Eastern Diocese, 
and be independent under the name and title of the Diocese of 
Vermont : 

Therefore, I hereby authorize and permit the Convention of 
the said Diocese of Vermont, at their next, or any other regular 
meeting, to proceed to the choice of a Bishop for the said Diocese 



390 JO URJfAL-1 832. 

of Vermont, and to transact all other business appertaining to an 
entire Diocese, and as being independent of the Eastern Diocese. 
ALEX. V. GRISWOLD, 

Bishop of the Eastern Diocese. 
Salem, May 7, 1832. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, the following preamble 
and resolution were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, at an adjourned session of the last annual Con- 
vention, holden at Arlington, on the last Wednesday of 
August, 1831, measures were taken for separating this State 
from the Eastern Diocese, and for erecting it into an inde- 
pendent Diocese — and 

Whereas, the said measures and the projected separation 
have received the approbation of the Convention of the 
Eastern Diocese — of the Bishop of the same — and of the 
Conventions of the several States, constituting that Diocese ; 
Therefore, 

Resolved, That the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont, is hereby declared to be, and is an inde- 
pendent and distinct Episcopal jurisdiction, under the name 
and style of the " Diocese of Vermont," subject only to the 
law of our Lord and Saviour, and under him, to the Consti- 
tution and Canons of the General Convention of the Prot- 
estant EjDiscopal Church in these United States. 

The proceedings relative to the organization of the follow- 
ing Parishes having been approved by this Convention, they 
were admitted into connexion with the Convention of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont : 

St. Paul's Church, Burlington ; Trinity Church, Milton ; 
Union Church, Springfield. 

The following gentlemen appeared, presented their Cre- 
dentials, and took their seats as Lay Delegates : Andrew 
Thompson and Justus Burdick, from St. Paul's Church, 
Burlington ; Samuel R. Crane, Warren Hoxie, from 
Trinity Church, Milton. 



JOURMAL-1832. 391 

The following Report of the Prudential Committee, was 
read and accepted : 
To THE Convention of the Diocese of Vermont, 

ASSEMBLED AT MiDDLEBUUY, MaY 30, 1832 : 

The Prudential Committee, in offering their Annual Report, 
have the pleasure to state, 

That the encouraging anticipations announced in their last 
Report respecting the Prudential interests of the Diocese, appear 
to be in a course of realization as rapid as could with reason be 
expected. The application to the Venerable Society, for a new 
Letter of Attorney, and for the appointment of additional Agents, 
was favorably received. As soon as the usual forms of business 
could be complied with, the proper document — not differing in 
any cardinal point from the former, was delivered to our Solicitor 
in London, from whom it was received here about the first of 
January last. The Agents appear to have felt the importance of 
proceeding to business with all possible dispatch. A meeting 
was held at Middlebury during the first week in February, where 
and when the agency was completely organized under the name 
and style of " The Vermont Agency of the Society for the Propa- 
gation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts." Rules of Business 
were adopted for adjusting and facilitating the operations of the 
Agency ; sundry important settlements were effected ; and much 
appears to have been done towards bringing the aifairs of the 
Agency, hitherto confused, into seemly shape and order. 

There still exist claims on the Treasury to a considerable 
amount — say throe thousand dollars, which the agents intend to 
discharge gradually while they annually distribute a small allow- 
ance to the Churches. At the February meeting an allowance of 
fifty dollars was made to each Church, or association of Churches, 
having a Clergyman. 

To what further expense the agency may be driven in asserting 
and maintaining the rights of the Church, the Committee can not 
with confidence predict ; though they consider the prospect, in 
that particular, rather favorable than otherwise. Some further 
expense there certainly must be — as the Convention will judge 
from the fact that tvvelve suits have been commenced at the late 
term of the Circuit Court. There is everv reason to believe that 



392 JOTJBKAL-1832. 

many of these will be compromised before going to trial. It is 
expected that an additional number of suits will be undertaken 
before the October Term. 

It appears to the Committee, that the Agency as now consti- 
tuted, may be relied on for acting with probity, wisdom and 
efficiency; and with due attention to that cardinal virtue in the 
management of all temporal trusts having a spiritual object — 
economy. It consists of the following named persons. Alexander 
Viets Griswold, Abraham Bronson, Daniel Chipman, Jonathan 
Hatch Hubbard, Jonathan Hagar, Dorastus Wooster, and Carlton 
Chase. 

With respect to the collection of the rents by the sub-agents, a 
subject on which the Convention has heretofore manifested some 
solicitude, the Committee see, at present, little cause of com- 
plaint. There doubtless are some cases of needless and injurious 
delay in the enforcement of collections. To this, the General 
Agency will give attention in due time, — being determined that 
men who undertake to do their business, shall do it promptly as 
well as honestly. 

It may be of use to such as have, or shall have business with 
the Agency, to know that the Agents have resolved to hold a 
meeting during the first week in the month of February, annually. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

CARLTON CHASE, for the Committee. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That a Com- 
mittee of three be appointed to prepare and report to this 
Convention, an Address to the Rt. Rev. Bishop Griswold. 

Whereupon the following gentlemen were appointed on 
said Committee : Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Sylvester Nash, 
Hon. Joel Doolittle. 

On motion by Hon. Joel Doolittle, the following Pream- 
ble and Resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, the State of Vermont has become, and is a sep- 
arate Diocese, in conformity to the Canons of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, and as such, entitled to separate 



JOURMAL-1832. 393 

Episcopal Jurisdiction : And the Episcopate of said Diocese 
being now vacant, and in the opinion of this Convention, it 
is expedient for the well ordering of the Church in said Dio- 
cese, that said vacancy be filled at as early a period as may 
be — Therefore, 

Resolved, That this Convention do, at its present ses- 
sion, proceed to the election of a suitable person to the 
Episcopate of said Diocese, to fill said vacancy, in the man- 
ner pointed out by the Canons of this Church. 

Resolved, That the Convention proceed to make the elec- 
tion, contemplated in the above resolution, on Thursday, 
the 31st day of instant May, at 8 o'clock, a. m. 

Convention adjourned until 8 o'clock to-morrow mornino', 
Thursday, May 31, 8 o'clock, a. m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 

Hon. Timothy Follett, a Lay Delegate from St. Paul's 
Church, Burlington, appeared, and, his Credentials having 
been previously presented, took his seat. 

On motion by Mr. Noble Hard, Resolved, That the order 
of the day be dispensed with, for the purpose of receiving 
the Parochial Reports. 

The following Parochial Reports were presented and read : 
ST. JAMES' CHURCH, ARLINGTON. 

W. S. PERKINS, RECTOR. 

Communicants (additions 3,) 112; Baptism, 1 adult; Deaths, 4. 
Since the last Convention, nothing specially interesting has 
occurred among us. The Church edifice has been completed and 
arrangements have been made to obtain a superior organ. The 
Missionary Association have constituted their Rector a life mem- 
ber of the General Missionary Society. 

ZION CHURCH, MANCHESTER. 

ABRAHAM BRONSON, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, 15; Marriages, 2; Funerals, 10; Communicants, 62. 
The work of grace has continued to make progress in this 



394 JOTJRKAL-1832. 

Church. The Parish is small, but a large majority of the people 
are decidedly and actively j)ious. Since the Convention of last 
August, two communicants have been removed by death, three 
have been transferred to other churches, eleven have joined in 
communion. Nearly twenty, it is believed, have been truly con- 
verted, who have not yet come to that holy ordinance. The 
Parish have contributed thirty dollars to constitute the Rector a 
life member of the General Missionary Society. 

TRINITY CHURCH, PAWLET. 

DANIEL FITCII, WARDEN. 

Removals, 1; Additions, 4; Communicants, 29. 
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WELLS. 

DANIEL LEWIS, JOHN C HOPSON, WARDENS. 

Communicants, 22. We have been dsstitute of preaching since 
the Rev. Mr. Bennet left Granville, the forepart of the winter last 
past; yet we are in connexion with the Church at Granville. 

ST. JOHN'S CHURCH, POULTNEY. 

MOORE BINGHAM, RECTOR. 

Communicants (added 2, died 2), 40; Baptisms (adults 1, in- 
fants and children 5), 6; Sunday Scholars, about 20. 

The Bible, Prayer Book, Tract, Missionary, and Female Char- 
itable Associations, heretofore reported as organized, continue their 
operations ; and though all they have accomplished may be little, 
yet they judge that that little should not be left unnoticed. 

On the 27th May, 1831, the corner stone of an edifice for the 
accomodation of this Parish, was laid with public and religious 
solemnities ; and by the Lord's blessing, the same has been com- 
pleted, and the congregation permitted to occupy it for the first 
time, on Sunday last, being May 27th, 1832. The house is ready 
for consecration ; and the Parish are inquiring when the Bishop's 
presence will afford them an opportunity of surrendering it to the 
honor of God's name and worship. 

The style of the house is Gothick , the material wood; its sit- 
uation and appearance, truly beautiful ; its internal arrangements 



JOUBJ^AL-1832. 395 

convenient; and it will seat about four hundred people. Its erec- 
tion has cost the few attached members of the Parish great effort 
and self-denial ; nor should it be concealed, that the Parish still lies 
under the painful and dangerous embarrassment of somewhat more 
than the cost of the lot of land on which the house is erected. 
Should assistance now be obtained to the amount of one 
hundred or two hundred dollars the Parish would doubtless make 
a prompt and successful effort for the speedy disposition of the 
remainder of its debt, and might then be represented as placed on 
a footing of permanence and prosperity. 

By the kind permission of the two congregations with which he 
is engaged, the Rector has, since and soon after the last meeting 
of this Convention, spent two Sundays with the parish in Rutland, 
and visited them a few times on other days. Of his doings there 
he thought it proper to transmit the more specific record to the 
present Rector of that parish. 

TRINITY CHURCH, RUTLAND. 

REV. JOHN A. HICKS. 

Rev. J. A. Hicks reports that he visited Rutland and officiated 
there for the first time, on the 2d Sunday of January. Having 
received an invitation from the Vestry of Trinity Church to be- 
come their Pastor, he^has since continued to preach in the East 
Village, twice on Sunday, and in the West Parish, weekly, on 
Thursday evening. Besides these services, he has preached oc- 
casionally at the Middle Village, and in other places of the sur- 
rounding country. He has lately established a weekly lecture, 
Bible class and Sunday School, and also a Bible class at the 
Middle Village. The Bible classes together contain about thirty 
members, and the Sunday School twenty-five scholars, and (inclu- 
ding their pastor) four teachers. The number of Communicants 
is about seventeen. 

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH, MIDDLEBURY. 

S. A. CRANE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (infants 8, adults 4) — 12 ; Communicants (added 8, 
died and removed 3), present number 49 ; Marriages 6 ; Burials 6 ; 



396 J0URJ{AL-1832. 

Sunday School, 40. Bible class, number varying. Easter col- 
lection, eight dollars and nineteen cents. Since the report in 
August last, there have been some additions to the Sunday School 
Library ; and although attendance on the stated and occasional 
services of the Church is by no means so general, constant and 
punctual, as the importance of the subject demands, yet, painful 
and unpromising as this circumstance is, the Rector still indulges 
the hope that on the whole, the condition of this Church is im- 
proving, and that the strong bearings of public worship upon the 
best interests of man, both in this life and the life to come, are 
beginning to be better understood and better attended to. 

TRINITY CHURCH, SHELBURN. 

LOUIS MC DONALD, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (infants) — 16; Marriages, 6; Funerals, 5 ; Commu- 
nicants (added 4, suspended 1) — 74; Sunday School, 35; Bible 
class, 20. I have attended one funeral in Charlotte, and one in 
Hinesburgh. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, BURLINGTON. 

G. T. CHAPMAN, RECTOR. 

In the Spring of 1831, 1 I'eceived an application from the then 
recently organized Episcopal Society at Burlington, requesting my 
services, for an indefinite time. The result was my arrival so as 
to officiate with them on the second Sunday of June, 1831. Soon 
after I was elected Rector of the Parish, and have regularly offi- 
ciated since, three times in each Sabbath, to full congregations. 
Before these pi-oceedings, there had been no stated services of our 
Church, at Burlington, and the number of families was estimated at 
about twenty. By the Divine blessing upon my ministry, the 
number of families is now near, or quite, eighty. The first time the 
communion was administered, there were seventeen to receive, 
several of whom had not previously joined the Church ; the pres- 
ent number is forty-eight. A Sunday School has been estab- 
lished and one hundred and three scholars have been admitted. 
The requisite number of teachers were also easily obtained, with 



JO URNAL-1 S32. 397 

three huadred and seventy-seven books of instruction, and one 
hundred and thirty-two suitable works for the Library. The 
numberof baptisms has been 48 — 34 children and 14 adults. The 
Marriages have been 4, the Funerals 5 ; and shortly after my 
arrival, confirmation was held by the Rt. Rev. Bishop of the Dio- 
cese, and fourteen persons were confirmed. A much larger num- 
ber are now ready to receive that holy rite, when the opportunity 
shall occur. The building of a Church edifice was commenced in 
September last, and is under contract to be completed by the first 
of next September, 

This edifice is of unhewn stone, in the Gothic style, with tower, 
buttresses, &c. and promises to be eminently beautiful, reflectino- 
great credit upon the zeal and liberality of this new and rising 
parish. The dimensions are in length, including recess and tower, 
86 feet ; in breadth, 48 ; height of the cornice, 29 feet ; of the 
tower, about 75 feet. The inside of the church is now finishing. 

Recaj)itulation. — Families, 80 ; Baptisms, 48, of whom 14 adults • 
Confirmed, 14; Communicants, 48; Marriages, 4; Funerals, 5* 
Sunday Scholars admitted, 103. 

May 30, 1832. 

N. B. I also succeeded during the last winter, in organizing 
a new Society, by the name of Trinity Church, at the town of 
Milton, fourteen miles north of Burlington. They will be repre- 
sented in the present Convention. It is believed that there are 
at least thirty of the most respectable families, in the town, who 
will liberally aid in endeavoring to establish this church, on a 
permanent foundation. When I have been there, which has been 
principally in the week time, they have manifested a most lauda- 
ble spirit, and notwithstanding the visits were made, in most 
instances, when the weather was extremely unfavorable, the at- 
tendance has been highly gratifying. I should mention that four 
of the preceding baptisms were at this town, and one at Shelburn, 
as also one Funeral at the latter place, the Rector of that Church 
being absent. The exact number of communicants, at Trinity 
Church, Milton, I do not know, and therefore, have not included 
them in the preceding number. They are, however, more than 
ten, and probably more than twenty. G. T. 0. 



398 JOUBJfAL-1832. 

UNION CHURCH, ST. ALBANS. 

S. NASH, RECTOK. 

Baptisms (adults 6, children 10) — 16 ; Marriages, 3 ; Commu- 
nicants, 58. Nineteen have been added, and nine have removed, 
since the last Convention. 

With heartfelt gratitude to the Great Head of the Church, the 
Rector would acknowledge His goodness in the revived attention 
to the subject of salvation, which was manifest in this parish, 
while himself was confined upon a sick-bed. 

There does not now appear to be any extraordinary attention, 
but there is good reason to believe that a goodly number will be 
witnesses, in eternity, to the benefit of that which was experi- 
enced in August and September last. May the Lord add to their 
number. 

TRINITY CHURCH, FAIRFIELD, AND GRACE 
CHURCH, SHELDON. 

A. B. HARD, MINISTER OF SHELDON. 

During the past year these parishes have been without a clergy- 
man. Occasional services have been held by ministers of other 
parishes, and lay reading has for the most part been kept up with 
commendable zeal, which has had a happy effect in promoting 
their spiritual health and prosperity. 

Fairfield — Baptisms, 2 ; Additions, 6 ; Communicants, 91. 
Sheldon — Baptisms, 10; Additions, 16; Communicants, 91. 
Since the first organization of the church, in these parishes, they 
have united in supporting a clergyman, who has alternately 
preached in each church, every other sabbath. During the past 
year, an amicable dissolution of this connection has taken place. 

The parish in Sheldon have joined with a few Episcopalians in 
Highgate, in supporting the ministry, and invited the Rev. A. B. 
Hard to become their minister. Mr. H. accepted the invitation, 
and took charge of the parishes in April last. In Highgate a 
church will be organized in a few weeks. A few Episcopalians 
in Fairfax have united with Fairfield in supporting the ministry. 
They have sent invitations to clergymen with the promise of com- 
fortable support, but have not as yet obtained one. " The field is 
now white unto the harvest," — the Lord send them a pious, 
devoted, self-denying laborer. 



JO UBJfAL—1 832. 399 

CALVARY CHURCH, BERKSHIRE. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 16, infants 14 ) — 30; Sunday Scholars, 40 ; 
Communicants (added 23, removed and withdrawn 4), 114. 

UNION CHURCH, MONTGOMERY. 

RICHARD PECK, RECTOR. 

Baptisms 2; Deaths, 2; Marriage, 1; Sunday Scholars, 60; 
Communicants (added 3, error in the last report 3, removed and 
died 8) — 72. 

CHRIST CHURCH, BETHEL. 

JAMES SABINE, RECTOR. 

Things generally, are much the same, as last year. Number of 

Communicants (removed to other places 2, by death 2) 90 • 

Baptisms (adults 3, infants 3)— 6; Sunday School, 26 ; Bible 
Class, 23; Collected for Contingent Fund, $3.83. 

ST. JAMES' CHURCH, WOODSTOCK. 

JOEL CLAP, RECTOR. 

Baptisms (adults 2, children 9)— 11 ; Marriages, 6 ; Removals, 7 ; 
Communicants, 25. Nothing of unusual interest has occurred in 
relation to the condition of this parish during the past year. 

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, WINDSOR. 

WILLIAM HORTON, RECTOR. ' 

Communicants, 58; Baptisms, 2; Sunday Scholars, 60. 
IMMANUEL CHURCH, BELLOWS FALLS. 

C. CHASE, RECTOR. 

Baptisms, (adults 9, children 12) — 21; Confirmations, 6; 
Marriage, 1 ; Deaths, 4 ; Communicants, 60 ; Sunday School 
Library, about three hundred volumes. Parish Library, one hun- 
dred and eighty-six volumes. 

Through divine favor the Rector is enabled to report this 
Church as in a condition highly prosperous. A large addition 



400 JOVBKAL-1832. 

has been made to the Communion, and it may be truly said, that 
the truths, duties and hopes of religion are regarded with great 
and increasing interest. By the desire of numbers who could not 
be accommodated within the limited circle of a Bible class, the 
Eector has converted his Bible class exercise into a weekly expos- 
itory lecture. This has hitherto been attended in a manner 
greatly to his encouragement. The Society of Ladies have the 
sum of fifty dollars in hand to be forwarded by the first opportunity 
to the Treasurer of our Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society ; 
it being their first payment on Mr. Greenleaf's plan. 

On motion, Resolved, That this Convention do now pro- 
ceed to the election of a Bishop for the Diocese of Vermont. 

After singing a portion of the 122nd Psalm, some min- 
utes were spent in secret prayer. The President then con- 
ducted the public devotions of the Convention in the use of 
some appropriate collects. 

The clergy then retired, for the purpose of making a 
nomination, as required by the 5th Article of the Constitu- 
tion. And on their return, the President informed the 
Convention that the Clergy had proceeded to vote by ballot 
for some suitable person to be nominated, for Bishop of the 
Diocese, and that the Rev. John H. Hopkins received a 
majority of the ballots of all the Clergy entitled to vote : 
And in behalf of the Clergy, nominated the said John H. 
Hopkins for Bishop of the Diocese of Vermont. 

The Clergy again retired, in order to give the Laity an 
opportunity to act upon the aforesaid nomination : on their 
return, the Laity announced by their Chairman, Hon. Joel 
Doolittle, the approval on their part, of the aforesaid nomina- 
tion of the Rev. John H. Hopkins, as Bishop of Vermont, 
by a majority of all the Lay Delegates entitled to seats in 
this Convention. 

The Convention adjourned until two o'clock, this after- 
noon. 

Thursday, 2 o'clock, p. m. 

The Convention met according to adjournment. 



JO JJRKAL-1 832: 401 

On motion, Ordered, that the following, which is a correct 
statement of the votes on the election of a Bishop which 
took place this morning, be entered on the Journals of this 
Convention: 

BY THE CLERGY. 

For Rev. John H. Hopkins, 7 

For Rev, John S. Stone, 6 

BY THE LAITY. 

Approving Rev. John H. Hopkins, . . 31 
Not approving, 9 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, unanimously, 
That the Rev. John H. Hopkins be, and he is hereby de- 
clared duly elected Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the State of Vermont. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Presi- 
dent of this Convention be, and he hereby is directed, under 
his own signature and the counter signature of the Secre- 
tary, to inform the Bishop elect of his election. 

The following gentlemen were appointed Delegates to the 
General Convention : Rev. Abraham Bronson, Rev. Carlton 
Chase, Rev. George T. Chapman, and Rev. Sylvester Nash.— 
Messrs. George Cleaveland, Simeon Ide, Truman Purdy, 
and Samuel R. Crane. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That in case it 
should be inconvenient for any or either of the aforesaid del- 
egates to attend the General Convention, they be severallv 
authorized to appoint a substitute, with the consent of anv 
two members of the Standing Committee. 

The Committee appointed to prepare an address to the 
Right Rev. Bishop Griswold, reported the following address. 
which was unanimously adopted : 

The Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
State of Vermont, — 

To the Right Eeverend Alexander V. Griswold 
Bishop of the Eastern Diocese:. 
Reverend Father in God, — In assuming the station of a dis- 
tinct and independent Diocese, we are reminded at every step of 
our measures, of the relation which our Church during the period 



402 JOURJ^AL-1832. 

of twenty years, has sustained towards you. Amidst the interest 
attending this great and affecting crisis in our ecclesiastical con- 
cerns, our " hearts are bowed as the heart of one man" at the 
thouo-ht of taking leave of him, whose hands, after the manner 
of the Holy Apostles, have been laid on us and our children, bless- 
ing, confirming, and ordaining in God's name. 

When we look back to the period of your first visitations, and 
consider that we were then " the fewest of all people," we feel 
thankfully sensible of that providence which set you over us in 
the Lord, and which enabled you by example, and counsel, and 
doctrine, to contribute so much towards the revival of his work 
among us. And now, in the very fact of our separation, we 
make it manifest, that the good hand of our God has hitherto 
rested on us, multiplying and strengthening us under your minis- 
try ; and at length, granting us such possessions and prospects, 
both spiritual and temporal, as seem to make it plain that we 
ought to ask of the Great Head of the Church, the entire services 
of a Bishop. 

This crisis has indeed been delayed through an extreme imwil- 
lingness to deprive ourselves of the ministrations of a Bishop 
whom we so truly revere and love. And we come to our present 
measures only under the conviction, that our Churches need a 
degree of attention which no man can possibly render, whose field 
of duty and weight of burdens are as great as yours. 

It may be truly said that the Lord has so multiplied the seed 
sown under your ministry, that the fruits have become more than 
you can gather. In compliance therefore with a suggestion often 
repeated by yourself, we are at length constrained to invite 
' another to enter into your labors ' — in the full belief ' that 
both he that hath sowed, and he that shall reap, will rejoice to- 
gether. ' " 

And now. Right Reverend Father, while with grateful and affec- 
tionate hearts we take leave of you, " sorrowing most of all that 
we shall see your face no more," suffer us as the children of your 
prayers and labors of love, to beg an interest in your remembrance 
and in your daily supplications before the Throne of Grace. And 
be assured that towards you we shall never cease to cherish a 
filial regard ; nor will it cease to be our hearts' desire that the 



J0URJ^AL-~1832. 4Q3 

Lord will have you in His holy and special keeping-sealing your 
Office and Ministry with abundant effusions of His Holy Spirit 

Tord rsi^'' '^'^'"^ ^'"' ^^"'"™ "^ ''^'°^'"^ ^" '^'' ^'^ °^ ^'^« 

On motion, Kesolved, that the members of this Conven- 
tion be and they hereby are requested severally to sign the 
aforesaid address; and that the Secretary be directed to 
forward it to Bishop Griswold. 

The Address was then signed by all the Clerical and Lay 
members of the Convention who were present. 

The Canonical Testimonial in favor of the Consecration of 
the Bishop elect was then read and signed by all the Clergy 
and all the Laity of the Convention who were present (See 
Appendix.) * ^ 

On motion by Eev. Mr. Chase, Resolved, That the Dele- 
gation to the General Convention be authorized to take such 
measures as may be necessary to obtain the Consecration of 
the Bishop elect. 

On motion. Resolved, That the next annual meeting of 
this Convention be held at Rutland. 

The Rev. George T. Chapman was appointed to preach 
before the next Convention, and the Rev. Anson B. Hard 
was appointed his substitute. 

The following Report of the Standing Committee was 
presented and read : 

At a regular meeting of the Standing Committee, holden at 
Arhngton on the 31st day of August, 1831, at which were pres- 

z h::; ^r^r^ ""''• '-'- ^^--^ ^- ^-^ ^'^p> 
jo^cif;, w'::; "^^^^^^^ ^-^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^-^^^-^' -^ ^-• 

The requisite Testimonials in favour of the Consecration of the 
Rev. Levi Sdhman Ives, Bishop elect of the Diocese of North 
Carolina and Rev Benjamin Bosworth Smith, Bishop elect of the 
Diocese of Kentucky, were duly executed. 



404 JOVBJfJ.L-1832. 

The Canonical Testimonial in favour of Lucius M. Purdy, 
recommending him to be received as a candidate for Holy Orders, 
was executed. 

At a meeting of the Committee duly called, holden at Wood- 
stock on the 2d day of November, 1831, present, Rev. Abraham 
Bronson, Rev. Joel Clap, Rev. Carlton Chase, Rev. Sylvester 
Nash, 

The Secretary of the Convention was directed to give notice 
to the Clergy and the several parishes in the State, that an elec- 
tion of a Bishop for the Diocese of Vermont will take place at the 
next annual meeting of the Convention in said State. And also 
to request the Standing Committees of the several States composing 
the Eastern Diocese, to call special Conventions in order to lay 
before them the application of this State to withdraw from the 
Eastern Diocese. 

The requisite Testimonial recommending John T. Sabine to be 
received as a candidate for Holy Orders was duly executed. 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 

May 29, 1832. 

The Treasurer of the Contingent Fund presented the 

following rejiort, which was read and accepted. 

Joel Clap, Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, 

In account with the Convention, Dr. 

To balance on hand, as per last Report, $79.38 

To contribution taken up in Convention, ...... 8.69 

To contribution from Union Church, St. Albans, .... 7.48 

" Zion Church, Manchester, .... 3.00 

" Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, . . 5.00 
•' St. Paul's Church, Windsor, . . . 5.00 

" Christ Church, Bethel, 3.83 

" St. Paul's Church, Wells, .... 1.00 

$113^ 
Per Contra, Cr. 

By cash paid for printing Journals of 1831, . . $12.00 
By Trunk for Records, &c 3.50 

$15.50 



Balance on hand this day, $ 97.83 

May 31, 1832. JOEL CLAP, Treasurer. 



JOURJ^J.L-1832. 405 

On motion by Kev. Mr. Nash, Resolved, That those 
parishes which have not taken up a collection for the Con- 
tingent Fund, be requested to take up a collection for that 
Fund, on or before the last Sunday in June next, and for- 
ward the same to the Treasurer. 

On motion, ordered. That the Secretary publish six 
hundred copies of the Journal of this Convention, at the 
expense of the Contingent Fund. 

On motion by Rev. Mr. Nash, Voted, That the Treasurer 
of the Contingent Fund be directed to pay to each of the 
Delegates from this Convention, who may attend the next 
General Convention, Ten Dollars. 

On motion. Ordered, That the following proposed altera- 
tion of the Constitution be entered upon the Journal. 

Resolved, That the Constitution of this Diocese be so 
altered, that the annual Convention shall meet on the third 
Wednesday in September, annually. 

The Prudential Committee for the year ensuing, was 
appointed as follows : — Andrew Thompson, John Atkinson, 
John A. Pratt, and Hon. Joel Doolittle. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer of the Contingent Fund be 
directed to forward to the Secretary of the General Conven- 
tion the assessment for this Diocese. 

On motion, Resolved, That a Committee of six be appoint- 
ed to make arrangements for the location and salary of the 

Bishop elect. 

The following gentlemen were appointed on said Com- 
mittee : Rev. George T. Chapman, Andrew Thompson, Esq., 
Rev. Carlton Chase, Hon. Joel Doolittle, Mr. Simeon Ide, 
and Rev. John A. Hicks. 

Rev. Silas A. Crane was appointed Assistant Secretary. 
Convention adjourned until 5 o'clock, to-morrow morning. 

Friday, June 1, 5 o'clock, a. m. 

Convention met according to adjournment ; and after a 

selection of collects read by the Rev. President, adjourned 

without day. A true Record. 

JOEL CLAP, Secretary. 



406 JO URJfAL-1 832. 



APPENDIX, 

We, whoise names are under written, fully sensible how impor- 
tant it is that the sacred office of a Bishop should not be un- 
worthily conferred, and firmly persuaded that it is our duty to 
bear testimony, on this solemn occasion, without partiality or 
affection, do, in the presence of Almighty God testify, that the 
Rev. John H. Hopkins is not, so far as we are informed, justly 
liable to evil report, either for error in religion, or for viciousness 
in life ; and that we do not know or believe there is any impedi- 
ment, on account of which, he ought not to be consecrated to 
that Holy office. We do moreover jointly and severally declare, 
that we do in our consciences believe him to be of such sufficien- 
cy in good learning, such soundness in faith, and of such virtuous 
and pure manners, and godly conversation, that he is apt and 
meet to exercise the office of a Bishop, to the honor of God and 
the edifying of His Church ; and to be an wholesome example 
to the flock of Christ. 

Done in Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the 
State of Vermont, at Middlebury, this thirty-first day in May, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two. 

CLERGY. 

Abraham Bronson, Rector of Zion Church, Manchester. 
Joel Clap, Rector of St. James' Church, Woodstock. 
Carlton Chase, Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls. 
G. T, Chapman, Rector of St. Paul's Church, Burlington. 
Sylvester Nash, Rector of Union Church, St. Albans. 
Richard Peck, Rector of Calvary Church, Berkshire. 
John A. Hicks, Rector of Trinity Church, Rutland. 
Louis McDonald, Rector of Trinity Church, Shelhurn. 
James Sabine, Rector of Christ Church, Bethel. 
William Horton, Rector of St. Paul's Church, Windsor. 
Anson B. Hard, Rector of Grace Church, Sheldon. 
William S. Perkins, Rector of St. James' Church, Arlington. 
S. A. Crane, Rector of St. Stephen's Church, Middkhury. 



JOURJfAL-1832. 407 

LAY DELEGATES. 
Truman Purdv, Ziou Church, Manchester. 
Jesse Hard, " " 

Hiram Fkenc«, " " 

Artemas Robbins, Immanucl Church, Bellows^ Falls. 
John Atkinson, " " 

M. S. BlTCKLAND, " <' 

A. Thompson, St. Paul's Church, Burlington. 

TlMO. FOLLETT, " " 

Justus Burdick, " " 

Calif Monroe, St. Paul's Church, Wells. 
John Richardson, Union Church, St. Albans. 
Benjamin Richardson, " " 

Alfred Wheeler, Trinity Church, Fairfield. 
Lyman Hawley, " " 

Jeptha Bradley, " " 

Isaac J. Potter, Grace Church, Sheldon. 
Fra. Bradbury, St. Paul's Church, Vergennes. 
Porter Howe, Trinity Church, Ratland. 
Lucius M. Purdy, " " 

John T. Sabine, Christ Church, Bethel. 
Jesse Lull, St. Paul's Church, Windsor. 
Simeon Ide, " " 

Noble Hard, St. James' Church, Arlington. 
Joel Doolittle, St. Stephen's Church, Middlebury. 
George Cleaveland, " " 

Calvin C. Waller, " " 

Timothy Marshall, St. John's Church, Poultney. 
Aaron Lewis, " " 

Daniel Fitch, Trinity Church, Pawlct. 
James Cook, " " 

AsHBEL Dickinson, Christ Church, Guilford. 
Thomas Prentiss, St. John's Church, Perkinsville. 

fifth article of the constitution of the PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL 
church in the STATE OF VERMONT. 

" If at any time a Bishop is to be elected by this Convention, 
the Secretary, by order of the President or Standing Committee, 
shall write to the Minister or one of the Wardens of each Church, 



408 JO UBKAL-1 832. 

at least six weeks before the election is to take place, and give 
notice of the time and place appointed for such election, and 
request that Delegates may attend the Convention for the purpose; 
and in every such election the Convention shall vote in distinct 
orders — the Clerical order shall make a nomination by ballot, and 
a majority of the Lay Delegates shall approve the appointment, 
before the person shall be considered elected." 



In the Address of Bishop Griswold to the Convention of the 
Eastern Diocese held in Trinity Church, Boston, September 26th, 
1832, there is not much which has particular reference to the 
Church in Vermont. What of that character it contains is here 
inserted : 

" In my late visit in those parts, I preached at Bellows Falls and 
Windsor in Vermont, but I judged it most suitable to decline ad- 
ministering confirmation, for which some in the latter place were 
prepared." 

" The Rev. Dr. Hopkins has been elected to the Episcopate of 
Vermont, and we are likely soon to suffer the great loss of his re- 
moval from this State ; but we ought humbly to trust that He who 
governs all things will overrule it to the more general good of His 
Church." 

"As I have resigned the jurisdiction of Vermont, and that State 
is now become a separate Diocese, it will be sufficient to state, that 
I leave it in great prosperity. Eighteen years ago they had but 
one, or at most two officiating clergymen : now they have twelve 
or more. They then had not one church edifice, properly their 
own : now they have twelve new ones which are consecrated, and 
five or six more which are built or in building. Then, if I recollect 
aright, they had three organized parishes : in their late Conven- 
tion, twenty-four were represented. Thousands of dollars they 
have in that time expended in obtaining possession of the lands 
which belong to this Church : now as we hope, the business is 
settled, and those expensive litigations at an end." 

" To the number of candidates for Holy Orders have been added, 
J. Hamilton Parker, Thomas Robinson Hunter, Francis Peck, Hen- 
ry Bulfinch, John T. Sabine, Nathaniel H. Munroe, Henry Water- 



JO URjyj.L-1 832. 409 

man, Joseph H. Dor, Jun., Darius Barker, Stephen C. Millet, 
Edward C. Ball, and Samuel Moody Emery : with two or three 
more, who, I am told, are by the Staudinoj Committee received, 
but their Testimonials not yet given to me." 

"The Rev. Matthias Munroe has been ordained Priest, and John 
Batchelder, Erasmus D' Wolfe, Joseph M. Brown, Mark Anthonv, 
D' Wolfe Howe, Ephraim Munroe, George Munroe, George V. C. 
Eastman, Jacob Pierson, Samuel M'Burney, Samuel B. Babcock, 
and Lucius M. Purdy, have been admitted to the order of Deacons. 
The Rev. Isaac Peck, Alonzo Potter, Benjamin C. Cutler, have 
taken letters dismissory to the Diocese of New- York. The Rev. 
Mr. Pierson is officiating at Guilford, in Vermont, and the Rev. 
Mr. Purdy has gone to Connecticut ; but neither of these two is 
dismissed from this Diocese. Through the Lord's goodness, none 
of our clergymen have been removed by death. 

" It is said of the Apostle John that the experience of a long life 
and still more the teaching of the Divine Spirit, had so convinced 
him of the excellence of charity, and the necessity of Christians' 
loving each other, that in his latter years, this was the constant 
theme of his preaching and exhortation. I can truly say that my 
own experience has led to the same conviction ; and that such is 
the teaching of the Holy Ghost, as recorded in the Sacred Scriptures, 
none who read them can doubt. Loving our Christian brethren is 
the best evidence ' that we have passed from death unto life ;' this 
indeed is the perfection of all morality and religion; even the ful- 
filling of the whole law. Without this charity, our faith and works 
of zeal are nothing. The worst enemies of the Church are they who 
disturb its peace, and the greatest obstacles to Christian love are 
bigotry and party spirit. The Church to which we belong is by 
nothing more distinguished than by its spirit of liberality, truly so 
called, and the sentiments of union and love which it so uniformly 
inculcates. None can be truly her children, nor deserve the name 
of Christian, who do not follow after that charity which is the bond 
of perfectness." 

"We of the Clergy, who profess to be ministers of Christ, 
and to act in the name and behalf of Him, who was so distinguished 
by meekness and love, are especially, and above all, under the most 
sacred and solemn obligations, 'to maintain and set forward, as 



410 JO UBKAL-1 832. 

much as lieth in us, quietness, peace and love, among all Christian 
people and especially among them' with whom we are particularly 
connected." 

"If we are deficient in this, we are faithful in nothing. And in this, 
my brethren beloved in the Lord, there are none, who preach the 
gospel of the blessed Redeemer, that have an easier or more pleas- 
ing task than us, the Clergy of this Diocese. The Laity — the 
people of our parishes, are generally and remarkably disposed to 
union and peace. One of the most encouraging circumstances 
in the state of this Diocese, and for which we ought daily to bless 
God, is the evident, and, I think increasing disposition to harmony 
and love. There is also, in my judgment, evidently among our 
population increasing desire to hear the pure Gospel of Christ 
preached in sincere love : to hear the doctrines of the Cross — ^the 
momentous words of eternal life. And certainly it would be doing 
injustice to our clergy to suppose that such a change is gradually 
taking place without their agency and co-operation. Union and 
good feeling have generally and very much prevailed now for more 
than twenty years among all our churches ; and there is, I am fully 
persuaded, not only an increasing willingness in hearing, but also 
an increasing fidelity in preaching the Gospel of salvation. Unhap- 
pily, there is before the public an appearance of discord among the 
Clergy of this State, much greater, as I believe, than actually 
exists ; and if any are so wicked as to rejoice in the expectation of 
seeing us a divided Church, they will,I trust in God.be disappointed. 
We stand on a foundation too firm to be shaken by momentary 
gusts of passion. We have too much regard for the religion 
which we profess ; for the Master whom we serve, and for the 
Church which we all love, to jeopard our souls for the vanities of 
life, or dishonor Christ by selfishness and pride. We will not for- 
sake the ark of our safety ; we will not like the raven fly to and 
fro while the floods continue ; but like the dove, return with the 
olive branch to its bosom." 



INDEX. 



Adams, Jasper, ordained Deacon, p. 173 ; ordained Priest, p. 174. 

AdXms, Parker, ordained Priest, p. 124. 

Allen, Ira, and Enoch Woodbridoe, petition the General Assem- 
bly to sequester the Church Rights for the benefit of Vermont 
University, p. 47 ; moves for a Committee to consider the propri- 
ety of disposing of these lands, pp. 47. 48; motion granted, pp, 
48, 49. 

Application to the S. P. G. in F. P. to convey prior to 1790, p. 7 ; 
in 1793, pp. 17, 18; in 1800, p. 70. 

Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, letter of J. A. Graham to, pp. 32, 
33, 36; his objection to the consecration of Dr. Peters, pp. 33 
—36 ; letter to Col. Graham, pp. 38, 39. 

Arlington, p. 154; p. 186; p. 192; p. 288; p. 320; p. 357; 
pp. 378, 379; consecration of Church, 365. 

Articles of Religion proposed by the General Convention read 
and considered by the Convention, p. 70. 

Assembly, General, Memorial of John Wheelock to, asking a 
Grant of land, p. 8; Grant made, p. 8; second application made 
but refused, pp. 8 — 10 ; directs the Selectmen to take charge of 
the Glebe and Society Lands and lease the same for seven years, 
p. 11 ; petition of the Episcopal Convention, in regard to Glebe 
and Society Lands in 1792, p. 13; Bill referred to the next 
Legislature, pp. 14, 17 ; Bills introduced respecting Church 
Lands, p. 17; action in regard to Church Lands in 1794, pp. 
47 — 54; the law respecting Glebes repealed in 1799, p. 66; 
action in regard to Glebe Lands in 1802, pp. 85 — 88; in 1803, 
pp. 89 — 92; in 1804, pp. 93 — 95; sequestration of the Glebe 
Lands in 1805, pp. 98 — 103; appropriation to the town of 
Pawlet, p. 140 ; appropriation in the matter of New-Haven and 
William Wheeler, p. 162; further appropriation, p. 177 ; course 
respecting the decision of the court, p. 235; act in regard to 
forfeitures, p. 256 ; appoint an Agent, p. 256 ; appropriation 
to close the aifair of New-Haven, p. 272; action in regard to 
the suit against Berlin, pp. 336 — 341 ; action in regard to 
Pawlet and Danby, p. 360. 

Attohney, Power of, to Col. John A. Graham, p. 22. 



412 IJ^DEX COJ^TIJ^UED. 

Baldwin, Eleazer, president of Con., in 1790, p. 6; in 1792, p. 
13 ; in 1793, p. 15 ; in 1794, p. 21 ; letter to the Arch-Bishop 
of Canterbury, pp. 30, 31 ; president of Con. in 1795, p. 55; in 
1796, p. 60; in 1797, p. 63. 

Barber, Rev. Daniel, Sec. Con. in 1790, p. 6; in 1792, p. 13; 
in 1793, p. 15 ; appointed a Deputy to the General Convention 
in 1793, p, 16; in 1794 appointed Sec. of Con., p. 21 ; informs 
Dr. Peters of his election, p. 26; letter to the Arch-Bishop of 
Canterbury, pp. 30, 31 ; action of ejectment against him by 
the Selectmen of Manchester, p. 65 ; decision against the town, 
pp. 65, 66 ; letter to Dr. Parker, pp. 75, 76 ; left the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, p. 175. 

Bass, Rev. Edward, elected Bishop of the Diocese of Vt. in 1793, 
p. 16; his letter of acceptance, p. 18 ; sketch of his life, pp. 19,20. 

Batciielder, John, ordained Dea. p. 379 ; ordained Priest, p. 409. 

Badry, Alfred L., ordained Dea., p. 202 ; ordained Priest, p. 228. 

Beach, Stephen, ordained Deacon, p. 143; Priest in 1817; In- 
stituted into the parish in Fairfield, Sept. 20, 1818, p. 157. 

Bellows Falls, pp. 157, 158, 175, 191. 

Bennington, p. 186, 379. 

Berkshire, 187, 188, 228, 247, 287, 319, 356, 378. 

Berlin, action to vacate the title of the Society Lands, pp. 336 
—341. 

Bethel, p. 190 ; p. 228 ; p. 235 ; p. 242 ; pp. 246, 247 ; pp. 248, 
249; p. 319; p. 357; p. 378. . 

Bingham, More, ordained Deacon, p. 288; ordained Priest, pp. 
319, 320. 

Bishop of New York requested to have charge of the Church 
in Vermont, p. 97 ; his assent, p. 104. 

Blackaller, Henry, ordained Deacon, p. 356 ; ordained Priest, 
p. 356. 

Board of Land Agents nominated in 1800, pp. 70, 71 ; in 1805, 
pp. 98, 104. 

Brainard, Elijah, ordained Deacon, p. 227. 

Bristed, John, ordained Deacon, p. 288 ; ordained Priest, p. 802. 

Bronson, Abraham, pp, 83 — 85; chosen Sec. of Con. in 1803, p. 
88; in 1804, p. 93; in 1805, p. 96; in 1806, p. 103; in 1807, 
p. 106; in 1808, p. 108; in 1809, p. 109; in 1810, p. Ill; in 
1811, p. 119; in 1814, p. 126; chosen President in 1816, p. 
140; in 1817, p. 146; in 1818, p. 151; in 1819, p. 159; in 
1820. p. 164; in 1822, p. 194; appointed a Trustee of the Gen. 
Theol. Sem., p. 198; chosen President in 1823, p. 204; in 



IKBEX COKTIKUED. 413 

1825, p. 258; in 1827, p. 292; in 1828, p. 305; in 1829, p. 
323; in 1830, p. 342 ; in 1832, p. 385. 

Burlington, p. 186; p. 378, 

Cambridge, p. 247. 

Canons of the Episcopal Church in Vermont, pp. 119, 120, 121, 
136, 170, 206, 211, 212, 34.3, 353, 354, 367, 308, 

Chapman, George T. ordained Deacon, p. 143. 

Chase, Carlton, ordained Deacon, p. 172 ; ordained Priest, p. 174. 

Chase, Philander, application for Deacon's orders, p. 61 ; sketch 
of his life, pp. 61 — 62. 

Chipman, Daniel, attorney for the Church, p. 150 ; report in he- 
half of the Agents, pp. 211—227. 

Chipman, Nathaniel, Petition of, to the Gen. Assembly in regard 
to the Lands of the Prop. Soc. in 1787, pp. 10 — -ll. 

Chittenden Thomas, certificate of, in regard to the Standing 
Committee, pp. 31, 32. 

Chittenden, Bethuel, President of Con. 1798, p. 63; in 1799, 
p. 67; in 1800, p. 69; in 1801; p. 72; in 1802, p. 84; in 
1803, p, 88; in 1804, p, 93: 1805, p, 96; in 1806, p. 103; 
in 1807, p. 106; in 1808, p. 107; in 1809, pp. 109, 110. 
Sketch of his life. p. 110. 

Clap, Joel, ordained Deacon, p. 171; ordained Priest, p. 173, 
instituted into the parish of Shelburn, p. 174. 

Clark, Daniel, action against, p. 115; decision, pp. 137 — 140. 

CoiT, Joseph, H. ordained Deacon, p. 288 ; ordained Priest, pp. 
319—320. 

Committee, Prudential, appointed in 1820, p. 170; in 1821, p. 
181; 1822, p. 197; 1823, p. 209; 1824, p. 241; 1825, p. 267 ; 
p. 1826, 280; 1828, p. 316 ; 1829, p. 325; 1831, p. 305; 1832, 
p. 405 ; Reports of, p. 281, p. 292, 294 ; pp. 305—309 ; p. 326 ; 
pp. 345, 346; pp. 363—365; 391, 392; instructed, p, 318; p. 
375. 

Committee, Standing, appointed in 1793, p. 15 ; letter to the 
Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, pp. 30, 31; to make report to the 
Convention, pp. 342 ; Reports of, 343, 366, 403, 404. 

Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in Vermont ; 
committee appointed to form one in 1799, p. 68 ; adopted in 
1810, p. Ill; committee to revise, pp. 146, 161, 165, 166, 
adoption of the revised constitution, pp. 166 — 168; proposed 
amendments, p. 210; amended, pp. 241, 244; proposed amend- 
ment, p. 280; adopted, pp. 292, 302, 303, 351—353 ; time of 
meeting changed, p. 405. 

Convention, Diocesan, 1790, pp. 5, 6; 1791, p. 12; 1792, pp. 
12, 13; 1793, pp. 14—17; 1794, pp. 20, 21, 46: 1795, pp. 



414 IJ{DEX COJfTIJfUED. 

55—60: 1796, pp. 60—62; 1797, p. 63; 1798 pp. 63— 65 ; 
1799, pp. 67, 68; 1800, pp. 69—71; 1801, pp. 72—83; 1802, 
pp. 83—88; 1803, pp. 88—92; 1804, pp. 92—95; 1805, pp. 
95—103 ; 1806, pp. 103—105 ; 1807, pp. 105—107 ; 1808, pp. 
107,108; 1809, 109, 110; 1810, pp. 110—118; 1811, pp. 118 
—122; 1812, pp. 122— 125 ; 1813, pp. 125, 126; 1814, pp. 
126—134; 1815, pp. 134—140; 1816, pp. 140—145; 1817, pp. 
145_151; 1818, pp. 151—158; 1819, pp.158— 163 ; 1820, pp. 
163—177, 1821, pp. 178—192; 1822, pp. 193—204; 1823, 
pp. 204—235; 1824, pp. 235—257; 1825, pp. 257—272; 
1826, pp.272— 290; 1827, pp. 290—303; 1828, pp. 304— 
322 ; 1829, pp. 322—341 ; 1830, pp. 341—360 ; 1831, pp. 360 
—380; 1832, pp. 380—410. 

Convention, General ; Deputies appointed in 1793, p. 16 ; in 
1796, p. 61; in 1798, p. 64; in 1799, p. 68; in 1801, p. 72; 
in 1810, p. 113; in 1813, p. 125; in 1816, p. 141 ; in 1819, p. 
161; in 1821, p. 181; in 1822, p. 197; in 1823, p. 209; in 
1824, p. 243 ; in 1825, pp. 267, 268 ; in 1826, p. 280; in 1827, 
p. 301 ; in 1828, p. 316; in 1829, p. 325; in 1830, p. 346; in 
1831, p. 375; in 1832, p. 401. 

CossiT, Rev. Mr. appointed Agent for the S. P. G. F. P., p. 7. 

CovELL, Joseph S. ordained Deacon, p. 250. * 

Crane, Silas A. ordained Deacon, p. 356; ordained Priest, p. 378. 

Dartmouth College, grant to, of township, p. 8 ; second applica- 
cation refused, pp. 9, 10, 11. 

Deputies to General Convention, appointed in 1793, p. 16; 
in 1796, p. 61 ; in 1798, p. 64; in 1799, p. 68; in 1801, p. 72 ; 
in 1810, p. 113; in 1813, p. 125; in 1816, p. 141; in 1819, p. 
161; in 1821, p. 181; in 1822, p. 197; in 1823, p. 209; in 
1824, p. 243; in 1825, pp. 267, 268; in 1826, p. 280; in 1827, 
p. 301; in 1828, 316; in 1829, p. 325; in 1830, p. 346; in 
1831, p. 375; in 1832, p. 401. 

Diocese, attempts to form a, in the valley of Connecticut River 
in 1801, pp. 73, 81 ; action of the General Convention in re- 
gard to it, pp. 74, 81 ; course of the Diocese of New Hamp- 
shire, pp. 74, 77, 78; number of parishes concerned, pp. 81 — 88. 

Diocese, Eastern, Constitution adopted 1810, pp. 112, 113; 
election of a Bishop, p. 115: his acceptance, p. 115, 116; his 
consecration, p. 117; Vermont wishes to withdraw, p. 301; 
subject postponed, p. 311; Massachusetts moves for a dissolu- 
tion, pp. 362, 363 ; action of the Vermont Convention, pp. 366, 
368 ; Convention proceeds to act, pp. 385. 

Eastman, G. V. C, ordained Deacon, p. 409. 

Edmond, David, appointed Agent of the State in the matter of 
the Propagation Society, and New-Haven, p. 162, 



IJVDEX COJ^-TIMUED. 415 

Enosburgii formation of parish, p. 201. 

Facts and Documents, 1794, pp. 20 — 54. 

Fairfield, p. 143 ; pp. 156, 157 ; pp. 186, 187; pp. 247, 248, 287. 

Fund, Contingent, to be provided by the Churches, pp. 264 — 266 ; 
p. 280 ; p. 293 ; p. 316 ; p. 325 ; p. 344 ; p, 375 ; p. 404. 

Gallup, Oliver, action of, in regard to Cliurch lands, p. 17. 

GiDDiNGS, Job, and Tinio, Todd to secure an Act, p. 6. 

Glebe Lands, granted by Gov. Wentworth, p. 6; taken posses- 
sion of by the Selectmen in 1787, p. 11 ; greater power given in 
1789, p. 11; sequestered in 1794, pp. 47 — 54; law repealed in 
1799, p. 66; committee appointed to lease in 1800, p. 70; sub- 
ject before the General Assembly in 1802, pp. 85 — 88; in 1803, 
pp. 89 — 92; in 1804, pp. 93 — 95; Convention votes to raise 
money to get possession, p. 97 ; sequestered by the General 
Assembly in 1805, pp. 98—103. 

Grauam, John A. sent to England to secure the consecration of 
Dr. Peters, and as Agent and Attorney of the Church, pp. 21, 
22; letter to Rev. Dr. Morice, pp. 23, 24. letters to the Arch 
Bishop of Canterbury, pp. 32, 44; interview with the Arch 
Bishop, pp. 33 — 35; letter to the Arch-Bishop, pp. 36 — 38; 
thanks for his services in England, pp. 56. 

Griswold, Rev. Alexander Viets, his election as Bishop, pp. 
114, 115; acceptance, pp. 115, 116; his consecration, pp. 117, 
118; Address in 1812, pp. 124,125; 1814 charge, pp, 127 
—131 ; Address, p. 131—133 ; Address, 1816, pp. 143—145 ; 
Address 1818, pp. 154—158; Address 1820 pp. 171—177; 
Addi-ess 1822, pp. 185—192; Address 1822 pp. 199—204; 
1823, pp. 227—231 ; 1824, pp. 245—250 ; 1825 pp. 268—270; 
1826, pp. 286—290 ; 1827 pp. 301, 302 ; 1828 pp. 318—322; 
1829, pp. 331—335 ; 1830, pp. 354—3.57 ; 1831, pp. 376—380 ; 
Address to, by the Convention, pp. 392, 401 — 403 ; Address, 
1832, p. 408—410. 

Gray, Jordan, ordained Deacon, p. 192 ; his death, p. 328. 

Guilford, pp. 171, 172; pp. 249, 250; p. 332; p. 378. 

Hopkins, Rev. John H., elected Bishop of the Diocese of Ver-' 
mont, pp. 400, 401 ; Testimonials pp. 406—408. 

Horton, William, ordained Deacon, p. 319; ordained Priest, 
p. 377. 

Henshaw, J. P. K., ordained Deacon, 132. 

Higiigate, p. 378. 

Humphrey, Rev. Aaron ordination of, p. 124. 

Hutchinson, Titus, appointed Agent of the State in the matter of 
Church Lands, p. 256 ; his action and report, pp. 336 — 337. 



416 IKBEX COKTIMUEB. 

Jericho, visit of Bishop Giiswold 1820; visit of Bishop Grisvrold 
1824, p. 247. 

Journal of Diocesan Convention 1790, pp. 5, 6; 1791, p, 12; 
1792, pp. 12, 13; 1793, pp. 14—16; 1794, pp. 20—54; 
1795, pp. 55— 60; 1796, pp. 60— 62; 1797, p. 63; 1798, pp. 
63—66; 1799, pp. 67,68; 1800, pp. 69— 71; 1801, pp. 72— 83; 
1802, pp. 83— 88; 1803, pp. 88— 92 ; 1804, pp. 92— 95 ; 1805, 
pp. 95—103; 1806, np, 103—105; 1807, pp. 105—107 ; 1808, 
pp. 107, 108; 1809, pp. 109, 110; 1810, pp. 111—118; 1811, 
118-122; 1812, pp. 122— 125; 1813, pp. 125—126; 1814, 
pp. 126— 134; 1815, pp. 134— 140; 1816, 140-145; 1817, 
pp. 14,5—151 ; 1818, pp. 151- 158 ; 1819, pp. 158—162 ; 1820, 
pp. 163— 177; 1821,pp. 178— 192; 1822, pp. 193—204; first 
published in 1822, p. 199; 1823, pp. 204—235; 1824, pp. 235 
—2.57; 1825, pp. 257—272; 1826, pp. 272—290; 1827, pp. 
290—303; 1828, pp. 304— 322 ; 1829, pp. 322—341; 1830, 
pp. 341—360 ; 1831, pp. 360—380 ; 1832, pp. 380—410. 

Leonard, Rev. George instituted into St. Paul's Church,Windsor, 
p. 228. 

Liturgy, proposed alterations by the General Convention, not 
adopted by this Church, p. 317. 

Lyon, Matthew, petition of, for grant in 1789, p. 11; dismissed 
in 1790, p. 11 ; appointed a Deputy to the Gen. Convention 
in 1793 p. 16. 

McDonald, Louis, ordained Deacon, p. 288; ordained Priest, pp. 
319, 320; instituted into the parish of Shelburne, p. 320. 

Manchester, Selectmen of, bring an action of ejectment against 
Rev. Daniel Barber, p. 65 ; decided agains* them, pp. 65, 66. 
State of Church, p. 154; p. 175; p. 192; p. 288. 

Memorial of certain Churches in New-Hampshire and Vermont 
to the General Convention, p. 73 ; Committee appointed there- 
on, p. 73 ; report of said committee and the action of the Con- 
vention, pp. 73, 74. 

Middlebury, condition of the Church, p. 144 ; p. 155 ; p. 157 ; 

* p. 186; p. 228; p. 248; p. 287; p. 320; p. 357; p. 378. 

Missionary Society, report of Committee, pp. 182, 183 ; Consti- 
tution, pp. 183, 184 ; meeting and report, pp. 244, 245 ; offi- 
cers, p. 303. 

Montgomery, visit of Bp. Griswold, 1821, p. 188; p. 356; p. 378. 

MoRicE, Rev. William, letters to J. A. Graham, pp. 24, 25. 

Munroe, Matthias, ordained Deacon, p. 379. 

New-Haven and William Wheeler, suit to recover lauds, pp. 
232— 235; pp. 271, 272. 



IMDEX COKTIMIJEB. /^Yj 

Nichols, Rev. James, action of Conveution in regard to in 1799 

p. G8 ; suspended, p. 174. 
Ogden, John C, in Convention, 1793, p. 15. 
Pakociiial Libraries, p. 285. 

Pardee, Rev. Amos, elected Secretary of Convention, 1801, p. 72. 
Parker, B. C. C, ordained Deacon, p. 288; ordained Priest" 

p. 302. 

Parker, Rev. Dr., his course in regard to the formation of a 
Diocese in the Valley of Connecticut River, pp. 73, 74. 

Parochial Reports, p. 120; p. 123; p. 135; p. 142; pp 152 
153; pp. 159, 160; pp. 164, 165; pp. 179, 180; pp. 194 — 
196; pp. 206-209; pp. 237-241; pp. 259-263; pp. 272— 
279; pp. 294-300; pp. 311-316; pp. 327-330; pp. 346 
—350 ; pp. 368—374 ; pp. 393—400. 

Pawlet, Town of, against Daniel Clark and others, to recover the 
Glebe ^Rights, p. 137 ; decision of Supreme Court, pp. 137— 
140 ; Society against Pawlet ; decision for the Society, pn. 357 
—360. ^ 

Peck, Richard, ordained Deacon, p. 287; ordained Priest, p. 319. 

Perkins, William S., ordained Priest, p. 379. 

Peters, Rev. Samuel, LL. D., elected Bishop, 1794, pp. 21, 25, 
26 ; letter to Rev. D. Barber, pp. 26, 27, 28 ; letter to the 
Churches, pp. 28, 29 ; letter to Truman Squier, pp. 40—46 ; 
resolution of respect, p. 56 ; consecration sought in this country, 
pp. 56, 57, 58 ; consecration refused, pp. 57, 58; sketch of the 
life of Dr. Peters, pp. 58, 59, 60. 

POULTNEY, p. 378. 

Randolph, visited by Bp. Griswold in 1821, pp. 189, 190; p. 247. 
Rutland, condition of the Church, p. 155; p, 186; 248; p. 287. 
Sabine, J-ames, ordained Deacon p. 332 ; ordained Priest p. 356 ; 

instituted, p. 378. 
Safford, Silas S., ordained Deacon, p. 132. 
Sandgate, organization of Church, p. 186. 

Shaw, Samuel B., ordained Deacon p. 202 ; ordained Priest p. 250. 
Shblburne, visit of Bp. Griswold 1818, p. 156 ; p. 165; p, 186; 

p. 248; p; 378. 

Sheldon, state of Church, p. 156; pp. 186, 187 ; p. 287. 

Society for Propagating the (tospel in Foreign Parts, grants 
to pp. 6 — 7 ; notice taken of them in 1762 and 1764, p. 7; in 
1773 Rev, Mr. Cossitt empowered to see Justice done in the 
allotment of Glebes and Society Lands, p. 7 ; in 1785 the Secre- 



418 IKBEX COMTLKUED. 

tary directed to write to parties in America p. 7 ; application 
for conveyance prior to 1*790, p, 7 ; Grants taken possession of 
by the Selectmen in 1787, p. 11; application for conveyance 
through the Bishop of New-York pp. 17 — 18; refused, p. 1 8 ; 
application to give a power of Attorney to Trustees, p. 70 ; re- 
newed application, pp. 96 — 98; subject before the Convention in 
1806, pp. 104, 105; in 1807, pp. 106, 107; in 1808, p. 108; 
in 1809, pp. 109, 110; in 1811, 1815, agents and attorneys, 
recommended, pp. 135, 136; Power of Attorney given 1816, 
pp. 147 — 150 ; suit against New-Haven p. 150 ; decision of the 
same, pp. 232 — 235 ; agents requested to report to Convention, 
p. 243 ; report of Committee in regard to its lands, pp.263 — 
266 ; statement of Mr. Bronson, p. 267 ; Committee appointed 
to aid the Board of Agents, p. 309 ; New Agents nominated, pp. 
324, 325 — 330, 331 ; decision of the Circuit Court in favor of the 
Society, pp. 338 — 341 ; suit against the Town of Pawlet, pp. 
357 — 360 ; decision for the Society, pp. 357 — 360. 

Squier, Truman, Sec. of Convention 1795, p. 55; 1796, p. 60; 
1797, 1798, p. 63; p. 63 ; 1799, p. 67; 1800, p. 69; 1801, pp. 
72, 73; 1802, p. 84. 

Stewart, Rt. Rev. Charles, kindly ofBces in regard to the Church 
in Vermont, p. 108; visit to Vermont, takes charge of petition 
to the S. P. G. p. 137 ; vote of thanks to, pp. 153 — 154 ; pay- 
ment for his trouble, pp. 165, 166 ; assessment on the parishes, 
pp. 169, 170. 

St. Albans, p. 156; p. 186; p. 248; p. 287; p. 320; pp. 356, 
357. 

Todd, Timothy, and Job Giddings to secure an Act, pp. 11, 12. 

Trustees of Donations, Board incorporated, 1810, p. 119. 

Van Ness, Gov., message of, in regard to Church Lands, p. 251 ; 
correspondence with the Hon. D. Webster, pp. 252 — 254 ; the 
end of the affair of New-Haven, and W. Wheeler, p. 271. 

Vergennes, state of church, pp. 155, 156 ; p. 186. 

Webster, Daniel, correspondence with Gov. Van, Ness pp. 252 
—255. 

Wheelock, John, proceedings of with the Legislature of Vermont, 
pp. 8, 9, 10. 

Windsor, p. 157; p. 173; p. 175; p. 190; p. 228; p. 332 ; p. 357; 
p. 377. 

WooDBRiDGE Enoch, and Ira Allen petition of to Gen. Assembly 
to sequester the Church Lands for benefit of Vermont University 
p. 47. 

Woodstock, p. 288 ; p. 319 ; p. 332, 333, 335, 357. 



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